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[[folder:Role-Playing Games]]
* In the big picture of ''Roleplay/DinoAttackRPG'', villains such as Anti-Kotua and Dino Aliens play little part in the overall story and just served as momentary threats.

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[[folder:Role-Playing Games]]
[[folder:Multimedia]]
* Many examples of Franchise/{{LEGO}}'s ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'' franchise, since the basics of its story were usually prepared in advance, but the book and comic quota demanded the addition of {{filler}} chapters.
** The original ''Mata Nui Online Game'' that focused on the side characters was planned as one, to the point that LEGO didn't even acknowledge its events as canon for years. But the cancellation of a high profile PC game (for which ''MNOG'' was meant as a mere addition) forced its developers to tie up both the side and main plots at once, and due to ''MNOG'''s massive popularity with fans, it has become one of the franchise's main pillars of storytelling. The first novel nevertheless ignored it altogether, as it was written back when the game's canon status was still dubious.
** Since the comics couldn't cover story material from the movies, filler stories were published instead when the movies came out, featuring characters battling random monsters like the Rahkahi Kaita, the Tahtorak and even infected villagers.
** The book ''Voyage of Fear'', where the Toa Metru come across the self-banished scientist Mavrah and his menagerie of beasts and obsolete enforcer robots. Mavrah wasn't referred to again until the story's cancellation 7 years later.
** The book ''Web of the Visorak'', featuring scene after scene of one-shot monsters and the Toa fleeing from a squad of malfunctioning Vahki robots while the Visorak stalk them in secret.
In the big picture of ''Roleplay/DinoAttackRPG'', villains such as Anti-Kotua AnimatedAdaptation, the whole book apart from the very beginning and Dino Aliens play little part in the overall story very end, and just served as momentary threats.all foes other than the Visorak, were glossed over.
** The couple page long Zyglak encounter from the 2007 comics, who are dealt with off-screen. There would have been an entire cancelled book about them too.


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[[folder:Role-Playing Games]]
* In the big picture of ''Roleplay/DinoAttackRPG'', villains such as Anti-Kotua and Dino Aliens play little part in the overall story and just served as momentary threats.
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* Near the end of ''Film/TheGumballRally'', a biker gang notices Angie (the [[WetBlanketWife Wet Blanket Girlfriend]] of Jose, one of the racers) walking around on a gas station across the street [[WalkingSwimsuitScene in her flag bikini top]] and decide to ask if she wants a sweet time. The harassment and subsequent escalation when she says "no" makes the film switch to [[AllBikersAreHellsAngels biker exploitation]] for five minutes.


** "The Great Divide" features a literal Wacky Wayside Tribe - or rather, two of them locked in a never-ending SpaceColdWar. Out of all the show's Wacky Wayside Tribe episodes, this one provides the least insight as to the characters and the world - the only characterization it establishes is Aang's ability to resolve conflicts. Unlike a great deal of the seemingly unrelated events in the first season, it never gets brought up again... except in "The Ember Island Players", during a ShowWithinAShow [[WhoWouldWantToWatchUs recapping the series to that point]]. The actors point out the Great Divide... and then decide to [[DiscontinuityNod keep flying over it]].
** "The Fortuneteller" has a Wacky Wayside Village where everyone unquestioningly accepts the fortuneteller's verdicts on what's going to happen. This becomes problematic when the fortuneteller predicts that the nearby volcano isn't going to destroy the village. The heroes notice that the volcano is about to erupt, but the villagers refuse to accept it because they believe their fortuneteller can't ever be wrong. After a lot of convincing, the villagers work together with the heroes to save the village from the eruption... ironically making the fortuneteller's prediction ("The village will not be destroyed by the volcano this year") technically correct.
** "The Cave of Two Lovers" has a Wacky Wayside Tribe of {{New Age Retro Hippie}}s (including one named Chong after famous RealLife hippie [[Creator/CheechAndChong Tommy Chong]]). The heroes travel with them through a cave, get lost, and use ThePowerOfLove (in the case of Aang and Katara) and guidance from giant [[MixAndMatchCritters badgermoles]] (in the case of Sokka and the hippies) to find their way out.

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** "The Great Divide" features a literal Wacky Wayside Tribe - or rather, two of them locked in a never-ending SpaceColdWar. Out of all the show's Wacky Wayside Tribe episodes, this one provides the least insight as to the characters and the world - the only characterization it establishes is Aang's ability to resolve conflicts. Unlike a great deal of the seemingly unrelated events in the first season, it never gets brought up again... except in "The Ember Island Players", during a ShowWithinAShow [[WhoWouldWantToWatchUs recapping the series to that point]]. The actors point out the Great Divide...Divide ... and then decide to [[DiscontinuityNod keep flying over it]].
** "The Fortuneteller" has a Wacky Wayside Village where everyone unquestioningly accepts the fortuneteller's verdicts on what's going to happen. This becomes problematic when the fortuneteller predicts that the nearby volcano isn't going to destroy the village. The heroes notice that the volcano is about to erupt, but the villagers refuse to accept it because they believe their fortuneteller can't ever be wrong. After a lot of convincing, the villagers work together with the heroes to save the village from the eruption...eruption ... ironically making the fortuneteller's prediction ("The village will not be destroyed by the volcano this year") technically correct.
** "The Cave of Two Lovers" has a Wacky Wayside Tribe of singing {{New Age Retro Hippie}}s (including one named Chong after famous RealLife hippie [[Creator/CheechAndChong Tommy Chong]]). The heroes travel with them through a cave, get lost, and use ThePowerOfLove (in the case of Aang and Katara) and guidance from giant [[MixAndMatchCritters badgermoles]] (in the case of Sokka and the hippies) to find their way out.


* [[ThoseTwoGuys Those Two Birds]] Dinky and Boomer and Squeeks the caterpillar in ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound''. Aside from helping to get Widow Tweed to save Tod, they contribute nothing to the main story line, and their antics, entertaining though they are, simply stop the film cold.

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* [[ThoseTwoGuys Those Two Birds]] Dinky and Boomer and Squeeks the caterpillar in ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound''.''WesternAnimation/TheFoxAndTheHound''. Aside from helping to get Widow Tweed to save Tod, they contribute nothing to the main story line, and their antics, entertaining though they are, simply stop the film cold.

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[[folder:Theatre]]
* ''Theatre/WesterosAnAmericanMusical'': The play's last song ends with Danaerys pointing out that the current status quo would be a good time for her to try claiming the Westerosi throne, but that before doing that, she needs to conquer three major cities on her continent of exile, as she did in the original story.
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* In ''VideoGame/Fallout3'', almost every non-main quest is this, often featuring a bizarre situation or antagonist but having little lasting relevance to the surrounding.
** Within the main story, the simulation where[[spoiler:your father]] is trapped makes barely enough sense to not be a BigLippedAlligatorMoment, but its length and [[ShootTheShaggyDog lack of lasting impact]] definitely qualify as this trope.

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* In ''VideoGame/Fallout3'', almost every non-main quest is this, often featuring a bizarre situation or antagonist but having little lasting relevance to the surrounding.
relevance.
** Within the main story, the simulation where[[spoiler:your where [[spoiler:your father]] is trapped makes barely enough sense to not be a BigLippedAlligatorMoment, but its length and [[ShootTheShaggyDog lack of lasting impact]] definitely qualify as this trope.


* ''Franchise/StarWars'': The various creature encounters in the movies are generally well-done uses of this trope. We didn't really ''need'' to see Luke pulled under garbage by a dianoga in ''Film/ANewHope'', or the Millennium Falcon almost get swallowed by a space slug in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', or the sea monster sequence in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', and most of these encounters didn’t really advance the plot and were never mentioned again afterwards, but adventures like these helped establish that there’s a big galaxy out there beyond what happens in the main story.

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* ''Franchise/StarWars'': The various creature encounters in the movies are generally well-done uses of this trope. We didn't really ''need'' to see Luke pulled under garbage by a dianoga in ''Film/ANewHope'', or the Millennium Falcon almost get swallowed by a space slug in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', or the sea monster sequence in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', and most of these encounters didn’t really advance the plot and were never mentioned again afterwards, but adventures like these helped establish that there’s a big galaxy out there beyond what happens in the main story. The casino subplot from ''Film/TheLastJedi'' is often seen as a poor example of this as it goes on for quite some time, features some jarringly bad CGI animals, and could have easily been written out of the script completely.


* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales2017'': In the middle of two larger story arcs (about Glomgold's wager with Scrooge and [[spoiler: Della's escape from the moon]]), the episode "Treasure of the Found Lamp" is slapstick comic relief introducing the new badass version of Dijon from ''WesternAnimation/DuckTalesTheMovieTreasureOfTheLostLamp''. Dijon's only later appearance so far is a brief cameo, but the episode serves to reintroduce characters who'll be important later in the season or have changed significantly from their 1987 counterparts.

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* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales2017'': In the middle of two larger story arcs (about Glomgold's wager with Scrooge and [[spoiler: Della's escape from the moon]]), the episode "Treasure of the Found Lamp" is slapstick comic relief introducing the new badass version of Dijon (now Djinn) from ''WesternAnimation/DuckTalesTheMovieTreasureOfTheLostLamp''. Dijon's Djinn's only later appearance so far is a brief cameo, but the episode serves to reintroduce characters who'll be important later in the season or have changed significantly from their 1987 counterparts.


-->''"...and I know not what could have led [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis the author to have recourse to]] [[ShowWithinAShow novels]] and [[RomanticPlotTumor irrelevant stories]], [[ItsAllAboutMe when he had so much to write about in mine; no doubt he must have gone by]] [[{{Filler}} the proverb 'with straw or with hay, &c.,' for by merely setting forth my thoughts, my sighs, my tears, my lofty purposes, my enterprises]], [[DoorStopper he might have made a volume as large, or larger than all the works of El Tostado]] [[note]]Alfonso de Madrigal, philosopher whose works "have more than twenty volumes.".[[/note]] would make up"''.

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-->''"...and I know not what could have led [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis [[DirectLineToTheAuthor the author to have recourse to]] [[ShowWithinAShow novels]] and [[RomanticPlotTumor irrelevant stories]], [[ItsAllAboutMe when he had so much to write about in mine; no doubt he must have gone by]] [[{{Filler}} the proverb 'with straw or with hay, &c.,' for by merely setting forth my thoughts, my sighs, my tears, my lofty purposes, my enterprises]], [[DoorStopper he might have made a volume as large, or larger than all the works of El Tostado]] [[note]]Alfonso de Madrigal, philosopher whose works "have more than twenty volumes.".[[/note]] would make up"''.


* The ''[[Literature/LandOfOz Oz]]'' stories are entirely comprised of these sorts of adventures, with a good portion of the stories featuring traveling characters "discovering" new, slightly dangerous parts of Oz and having to navigate around the wild animals / monsters / cannibals / etc, and a lot of the rest having the same on the way to Oz as well.
** This goes back to the first book and the Dainty China Country. A city surrounded by a wall that only exists to lengthen the journey from Point A to Point B. The instant they leave the city it's never spoken of again.

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* The ''[[Literature/LandOfOz Oz]]'' ''Literature/LandOfOz'' stories are entirely comprised of these sorts of adventures, with a good portion of the stories featuring traveling characters "discovering" new, slightly dangerous parts of Oz and having to navigate around the wild animals / monsters / cannibals / etc, and a lot of the rest having the same on the way to Oz as well.
** This goes back to the first book ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' and the Dainty China Country. A city surrounded by a wall that only exists to lengthen the journey from Point A to Point B. The instant they leave the city it's never spoken of again.



%%* Much of ''[[Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn Huckleberry Finn]]''.

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%%* Much of ''[[Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn Huckleberry Finn]]''.''Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn''.


* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales2017'': In the middle of two larger story arcs (about Glomgold's wager with Scrooge and [[spoiler: Della's escape from the moon]]), the episode "Treasure of the Found Lamp" is slapstick comic relief introducing the new {{Badass}} version of Dijon from ''WesternAnimation/DuckTalesTheMovieTreasureOfTheLostLamp''. Dijon's only later appearance so far is a brief cameo, but the episode serves to reintroduce characters who'll be important later in the season or have changed significantly from their 1987 counterparts.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales2017'': In the middle of two larger story arcs (about Glomgold's wager with Scrooge and [[spoiler: Della's escape from the moon]]), the episode "Treasure of the Found Lamp" is slapstick comic relief introducing the new {{Badass}} badass version of Dijon from ''WesternAnimation/DuckTalesTheMovieTreasureOfTheLostLamp''. Dijon's only later appearance so far is a brief cameo, but the episode serves to reintroduce characters who'll be important later in the season or have changed significantly from their 1987 counterparts.


* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'': The second party of the "Time is Money" serial, "The Duck Who Would Be King". On their way back to the future from One Million BC, Scrooge and company accidentally crash-land in the ancient oriental kingdom of Toupee and become involved in its internal politics. While "The Duck Who Would Be King" is considered an entertaining episode in its own right, it has next to no impact on the rest of the five-parter.

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* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'': The second party part of the "Time is Money" serial, "The Duck Who Would Be King". On their way back to the future from One Million BC, Scrooge and company accidentally crash-land in the ancient oriental kingdom of Toupee and become involved in its internal politics. While "The Duck Who Would Be King" is considered an entertaining episode in its own right, it has next to no impact on the rest of the five-parter.five-parter.
* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales2017'': In the middle of two larger story arcs (about Glomgold's wager with Scrooge and [[spoiler: Della's escape from the moon]]), the episode "Treasure of the Found Lamp" is slapstick comic relief introducing the new {{Badass}} version of Dijon from ''WesternAnimation/DuckTalesTheMovieTreasureOfTheLostLamp''. Dijon's only later appearance so far is a brief cameo, but the episode serves to reintroduce characters who'll be important later in the season or have changed significantly from their 1987 counterparts.


* The Sathuli in the ''Literature/{{Drenai}}'' saga.

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* %%* The Sathuli in the ''Literature/{{Drenai}}'' saga.

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* The final ''Franchise/{{Quatermass}}'' serial has the section with the old people living in the scrapyard, which was specifically written so that it could be removed for a condensed feature-film version.

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* In ''VideoGame/BoxxyQuestTheGatheringStorm'', the surreal “Tower of Plot” dungeon in Chapter 6 is practically a gauntlet of these. Each floor has a new one, like a pair of [[ForeverWar Forever Warring]] tribes made up of sentient crabs and turnips, and a village of cultist farmers who turn into skeletons and chase you when night falls. Once you reach the top of the tower, [[spoiler: [[AllJustADream the whole thing turns out to have been a dream]]]].

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