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* ''Film/StealingHeaven'': Though not formally sworn, Abelard is effectively under this as he teaches at the University of Paris, and teachers there are expected to remain celibate. It's one reason why his relationship with Héloïse is kept secret. Later, they both take them formally as part of becoming a monk and nun respectively (despite then being married), that they keep.

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* ''Film/StealingHeaven'': Though not formally sworn, Abelard is effectively under this as he teaches at the University of Paris, and teachers there are expected to remain celibate. It's one reason why his relationship with Héloïse is kept secret. Later, they both take them formally as part of becoming a monk and nun respectively (despite then being married), that they keep.



** This wasn't ''always'' a requirement of Catholic priests, and technically is not a dogma of the Church (that is, something held to be an infallible truth, belief in which is a fundamental requirement of Catholicism and denial of which would be innately heretical). Thus, it's technically possible that any future Pope could abolish the requirement. But celibacy of the priesthood has become such a deep-rooted tradition of the Church that's it's highly unlikely this would happen.[[note]]Originally, it was a policy put in place to curb {{Nepotism}}, as Popes/priests/bishops/etc. of the time were passing their position on to their sons, whether or not those sons were qualified. Saying that priests could not be married, and could not have sexual relationships, was a way of solving that problem, that became part of a larger part of tradition, by depicting it as a worthy sacrifice. However, many still just had children by mistresses, then claimed these were "nephews" (this is where the term "nepotism" actually came from.[[/note]] However, men who married before being ordained are allowed to become priests.

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** This wasn't ''always'' a requirement of Catholic priests, and technically is not a dogma of the Church (that is, something held to be an infallible truth, belief in which is a fundamental requirement of Catholicism and denial of which would be innately heretical). Thus, it's technically possible that any future Pope could abolish the requirement. But celibacy of the priesthood has become such a deep-rooted tradition of the Church that's it's highly unlikely this would happen.[[note]]Originally, it was a policy put in place to curb {{Nepotism}}, as Popes/priests/bishops/etc. of the time were passing their position on to their sons, whether or not those sons were qualified. Saying that priests could not be married, and could not have sexual relationships, was a way of solving that problem, that became part of a larger part of tradition, by depicting it as a worthy sacrifice. However, many still just had children by mistresses, then claimed these were "nephews" (this is where the term "nepotism" actually came from.from).[[/note]] However, men who married before being ordained are allowed to become priests.

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* ''Film/RobinAndMarian'': Though a nun, Marian doesn't even hesitate about breaking her vow by having sex with Robin when they rekindle their relationship.
* ''Film/StealingHeaven'': Though not formally sworn, Abelard is effectively under this as he teaches at the University of Paris, and teachers there are expected to remain celibate. It's one reason why his relationship with Héloïse is kept secret. Later, they both take them formally as part of becoming a monk and nun respectively (despite then being married), that they keep.

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* ''Literature/TheMentalState'' features a character called Charlie Walter. He is a celibate paedophile who is determined not to let his condition harm anyone. He is arrested for having lolicon imagery on his computer, which he uses to sublimate his urges. His vow is fairly meaningless under current circumstances.


A note on terminology: people can mean different things by the word "celibacy" -- sometimes it means not having sex, but it can also mean not being married. The fuzziness of definition may be due to the fact that traditionally, a ban on marriage equated to a ban on sex automatically, since extramarital sex was forbidden. In fictional examples, however, this may not be so. "Chastity" usually means refraining from engaging in ''illicit'' sex. So a "chaste husband" would be one who doesn't cheat on his wife, for instance.

to:

A note on terminology: people can mean different things by the word "celibacy" -- sometimes it means not having sex, but it can also mean not being married. The fuzziness of definition may be due to the fact that traditionally, a ban on marriage equated to a ban on sex automatically, automatically since extramarital sex was forbidden. In fictional examples, however, this may not be so. "Chastity" usually means refraining from engaging in ''illicit'' sex. So a "chaste husband" would be one who doesn't cheat on his wife, for instance.



* ''Film/TheLoveGuru '' , the main character Maurice Pitka at 12 years old is forced to wear a chastity belt with an Elephant head codpiece. It does not protect it's contents from ''{{groin attack}}s''.

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* ''Film/TheLoveGuru '' , ''Film/TheLoveGuru'', the main character Maurice Pitka at 12 years old is forced to wear a chastity belt with an Elephant head codpiece. It does not protect it's its contents from ''{{groin attack}}s''.



* ''Film/LoveSoDivine'' is romantic comedy about a young Korean seminarian who finds himself questioning the celibacy that lies ahead for him as he and the female lead (a {{Tsundere}} HardDrinkingPartyGirl) gradually warm up to each other.

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* ''Film/LoveSoDivine'' is a romantic comedy about a young Korean seminarian who finds himself questioning the celibacy that lies ahead for him as he and the female lead (a {{Tsundere}} HardDrinkingPartyGirl) gradually warm up to each other.



* In a another film called ''Film/{{Priest 2011}}'', the titular priests (who are more like warriors than priests as commonly understood, but are still associated with the Church) are required to be celibate. The main character left his lover and newborn daughter behind when he joined.

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* In a [[NamesTheSame another (but completely different) film called called]] ''Film/{{Priest 2011}}'', the titular priests (who are more like warriors than priests as commonly understood, but are still associated with the Church) are required to be celibate. The main character left his lover and newborn daughter behind when he joined.



** Esmerelda Weatherwax never had any (non-witchcraft) relations with men after Mustrum Ridcully left for Unseen University, which becomes a plot point when a unicorn shows up. In her case it wasn't really a vow, since she found it easier being the scary witch.

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** Esmerelda Weatherwax never had any (non-witchcraft) relations with men after Mustrum Ridcully left for Unseen University, which becomes a plot point when a unicorn shows up. In her case case, it wasn't really a vow, vow since she found it easier being the scary witch.



* In ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin]]'', it turns out that the title character's grandmother was under vows but broke them. This has an actual negative effect due to VirginPower, and causes something of a BrokenPedestal.

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* In ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin]]'', it turns out that the title character's grandmother was under vows but broke them. This has an actual negative effect due to VirginPower, VirginPower and causes something of a BrokenPedestal.



* In ''Literature/TheDiamondThrone'' it notes that the Pandion Knights had originally taken an oath to never marry (and by implication never have sex). However, due to a shortage of Pandions and applicants for knighthood they were allowed by the church to take back their vows so they could marry and have children. That it was originally enforced probably has to do with that Elene priests take an oath of celibacy, and Church Knights (including the Pandions) are ''technically'' part of the priesthood.

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* In ''Literature/TheDiamondThrone'' it notes that the Pandion Knights had originally taken an oath to never marry (and by implication never have sex). However, due to a shortage of Pandions and applicants for knighthood knighthood, they were allowed by the church to take back their vows so they could marry and have children. That it was originally enforced probably has to do with that Elene priests take an oath of celibacy, and Church Knights (including the Pandions) are ''technically'' part of the priesthood.



** The ''Literature/RepublicCommandoSeries'' has a cameo by Callista Ming from ''Literature/TheCallistaTrilogy'', who is a member of a Jedi sect led by Master Djinn Altis that encourages romantic relations. The mainstream order considers them semi-heretical. Meanwhile Etain Tur-Mukan takes the SecretRelationship approach and has a son with Darman, one of the eponymous clone commandos.

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** The ''Literature/RepublicCommandoSeries'' has a cameo by Callista Ming from ''Literature/TheCallistaTrilogy'', who is a member of a Jedi sect led by Master Djinn Altis that encourages romantic relations. The mainstream order considers them semi-heretical. Meanwhile Meanwhile, Etain Tur-Mukan takes the SecretRelationship approach and has a son with Darman, one of the eponymous clone commandos.



* In the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series, medicine cats (the healers/spiritual leaders of their Clan) -- are not allowed to take a mate. It is also often said that female deputies and leaders cannot have kits, but for them it's more of a guideline, as compared to the medicine cats, where it's a very strict rule.

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* In the ''Literature/WarriorCats'' series, medicine cats (the healers/spiritual leaders of their Clan) -- are not allowed to take a mate. It is also often said that female deputies and leaders cannot have kits, but for them them, it's more of a guideline, as compared to the medicine cats, where it's a very strict rule.



* In ''Series/FatherTed'', Bishop Brennan apparently has a mistress and a son, as shown in a holiday video tape found in his bag. The main characters use this tape as blackmail when Brennan threatens to [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassign them somewhere even worse]].

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* In ''Series/FatherTed'', Bishop Brennan apparently has a mistress and a son, as shown in a holiday video tape videotape found in his bag. The main characters use this tape as blackmail when Brennan threatens to [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassign them somewhere even worse]].



* One ''Series/BlueBloods'' episode has the Reagans' now-deceased minister be investigated as a candidate for canonization. Frank discovers that Father Bill had a secret romantic relationship with a woman for a number of years, but in deference to his Catholic vow of celibacy it was apparently never consummated. Frank compares this (and Father Bill protecting conscientious objectors during the UsefulNotes/VietnamWar) favorably to a saint who was a party to what would nowadays be considered genocide, and concludes that "the church could do a lot worse than Saint Bill from Brooklyn."

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* One ''Series/BlueBloods'' episode has the Reagans' now-deceased minister be investigated as a candidate for canonization. Frank discovers that Father Bill had a secret romantic relationship with a woman for a number of years, but in deference to his Catholic vow of celibacy celibacy, it was apparently never consummated. Frank compares this (and Father Bill protecting conscientious objectors during the UsefulNotes/VietnamWar) favorably to a saint who was a party to what would nowadays be considered genocide, and concludes that "the church could do a lot worse than Saint Bill from Brooklyn."



* In ''Series/EmeraldCity'', the women of Glinda's order make a vow to remain chaste and unattached in order to devote all their energies to serving the Wizard. One of them breaks this by having an affair, and gets pregnant.

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* In ''Series/EmeraldCity'', the women of Glinda's order make a vow to remain chaste and unattached in order to devote all their energies to serving the Wizard. One of them breaks this by having an affair, affair and gets pregnant.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has an optional SideQuest in which a woman wants you to find a certain powerful aphrodisiac--she intends to "convince" her crush to abandon his plans to enter the priesthood, since that would prevent them from ever hooking up.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' has an optional SideQuest in which a woman wants you to find a certain powerful aphrodisiac--she intends to "convince" her crush to abandon his plans to enter the priesthood, priesthood since that would prevent them from ever hooking up.



'''Angela''': Wouldn't you rather be with a real girl? Maybe you should try it, before you decide.\\

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'''Angela''': Wouldn't you rather be with a real girl? Maybe you should try it, it before you decide.\\



** One of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'''s companions, Sebastian Vael, is a brother of the Chantry, and is therefore bound by vows of celibacy. It is possible for players to develop a non-sexual relationship with him, but he won't break his vows. Players can tease him, though.

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** One of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'''s companions, Sebastian Vael, is a brother of the Chantry, Chantry and is therefore bound by vows of celibacy. It is possible for players to develop a non-sexual relationship with him, but he won't break his vows. Players can tease him, though.



** A random event that may trigger if you were in love with a deceased spouse allows you to [[TheMourningAfter forever swear off sex in their memory]], granting the trait "Celibate". Alternatively you can go out partying and try to forget her, giving the trait "Lustful".

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** A random event that may trigger if you were in love with a deceased spouse allows you to [[TheMourningAfter forever swear off sex in their memory]], granting the trait "Celibate". Alternatively Alternatively, you can go out partying and try to forget her, giving the trait "Lustful".



* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', Jolee Bindo reveals that he was once secretly married in defiance of his Jedi vow of celibacy, but his wife fell to the Dark Side, left him, and was killed fighting for the Sith Lord Exar Kun. Despite this, he argues to the PlayerCharacter that love itself is a good thing. In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'', the Exile remarks that by the time she was in the Order (a couple decades after Bindo), [[PersonAsVerb "pulling a Bindo"]] had become a slang term for leaving the Order for love.

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* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', Jolee Bindo reveals that he was once secretly married in defiance of his Jedi vow of celibacy, but his wife fell to the Dark Side, left him, and was killed fighting for the Sith Lord Exar Kun. Despite this, he argues to the PlayerCharacter that love itself is a good thing. In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'', the Exile remarks that by the time she was in the Order (a couple of decades after Bindo), [[PersonAsVerb "pulling a Bindo"]] had become a slang term for leaving the Order for love.



* On an episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'', all evidence points to Bobby being the reincarnation of a Buddhist Lama. He's pretty excited about it, until he hears that celibacy is a requirement, which means he'd have to break up with Connie. He purposely fails the second test so that he can continue to date her. [[spoiler:Except he still technically passed it, but the head monk was nice enough to let him go.]]

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* On an episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'', all evidence points to Bobby being the reincarnation of a Buddhist Lama. He's pretty excited about it, it until he hears that celibacy is a requirement, which means he'd have to break up with Connie. He purposely fails the second test so that he can continue to date her. [[spoiler:Except he still technically passed it, but the head monk was nice enough to let him go.]]



--> "They forbid people to marry and order them to abstain from certain foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and who know the truth."

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--> "They --->"They forbid people to marry and order them to abstain from certain foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and who know the truth."



* There are also some Catholics who practice spiritual or Josephite marriage (the latter name is from the dogma that Mary and Joseph had a marriage like this) where the couple agree to be abstinent. It has to be a freely-made mutual decision however.

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* There are also some Catholics who practice spiritual or Josephite marriage (the latter name is from the dogma that Mary and Joseph had a marriage like this) where the couple agree agrees to be abstinent. It has to be a freely-made mutual decision decision, however.



* Until the 1880s, [[{{UsefulNotes/Oxbridge}} Oxford and Cambridge Universities]] had a vow of celibacy for dons. This was originally because it was assumed that all scholars would have training as priests. However by the 18th century the definition of "celibacy" in this context had shifted; a Fellow of the College could have relations with women, but couldn't get married.

to:

* Until the 1880s, [[{{UsefulNotes/Oxbridge}} Oxford and Cambridge Universities]] had a vow of celibacy for dons. This was originally because it was assumed that all scholars would have training as priests. However by the 18th century century, the definition of "celibacy" in this context had shifted; a Fellow of the College could have relations with women, but couldn't get married.

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* ''Literature/TheHanSoloTrilogy'': Bria took such a vow as a Pilgrim on Ylesia, which means she's upset when Han kisses her and feels attracted to him. She also later tries to use this when Ganar Tos is having Teroenza marry them but the latter simply waves this aside by releasing her from it. After she's escaped with Han, having already learned that their religion was fake, Bria naturally no longer feels bound by this, and the pair have sex.


** This wasn't ''always'' a requirement of Catholic priests, and technically is not a dogma of the Church (that is, something held to be an infallible truth, belief in which is a fundamental requirement of Catholicism and denial of which would be innately heretical). Thus, it's technically possible that any future Pope could abolish the requirement. But celibacy of the priesthood has become such a deep-rooted tradition of the Church that's it's highly unlikely this would happen.[[note]]Originally, it was a policy put in place to curb {{Nepotism}}, as Popes/priests/bishops/etc. of the time were passing their position on to their sons, whether or not those sons were qualified. Saying that priests could not be married, and could not have sexual relationships, was a way of solving that problem, that became part of a larger part of tradition, by depicting it as a worthy sacrifice. [[/note]]

to:

** This wasn't ''always'' a requirement of Catholic priests, and technically is not a dogma of the Church (that is, something held to be an infallible truth, belief in which is a fundamental requirement of Catholicism and denial of which would be innately heretical). Thus, it's technically possible that any future Pope could abolish the requirement. But celibacy of the priesthood has become such a deep-rooted tradition of the Church that's it's highly unlikely this would happen.[[note]]Originally, it was a policy put in place to curb {{Nepotism}}, as Popes/priests/bishops/etc. of the time were passing their position on to their sons, whether or not those sons were qualified. Saying that priests could not be married, and could not have sexual relationships, was a way of solving that problem, that became part of a larger part of tradition, by depicting it as a worthy sacrifice. [[/note]]However, many still just had children by mistresses, then claimed these were "nephews" (this is where the term "nepotism" actually came from.[[/note]] However, men who married before being ordained are allowed to become priests.



* Islam and Judaism have tended to frown on celibacy, although there are exceptions. Some of the Sufi Muslims, for instance, have practiced it.

to:

* Islam and Judaism have tended to frown on celibacy, although though there are exceptions. Some of the Sufi Muslims, for instance, have practiced it.


(A note on terminology: People can mean different things by the word "celibacy" -- sometimes it means not having sex, but it can also mean not being married. The fuzziness of definition may be due to the fact that traditionally, a ban on marriage equated to a ban on sex automatically, since extramarital sex was forbidden. In fictional examples, however, this may not be so. "Chastity" usually means refraining from engaging in ''illicit'' sex. So a "chaste husband" would be one's who doesn't cheat on his wife, for instance.)

to:

(A A note on terminology: People people can mean different things by the word "celibacy" -- sometimes it means not having sex, but it can also mean not being married. The fuzziness of definition may be due to the fact that traditionally, a ban on marriage equated to a ban on sex automatically, since extramarital sex was forbidden. In fictional examples, however, this may not be so. "Chastity" usually means refraining from engaging in ''illicit'' sex. So a "chaste husband" would be one's one who doesn't cheat on his wife, for instance.)
instance.


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* ''Film/VirginTerritory'': Multiple nuns happily break theirs to have sex with Lorenzo.


* In ''Film/{{Bedazzled 1967}}'' a trickster devil gives Stanley Moon seven wishes in return for his soul. Stanley is in love with Margaret so he wishes for them to be together. The Devil makes Margaret and Stanley nuns in love with each other; they're together in a nunnery but since they're nuns they're celibate.

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* In ''Film/{{Bedazzled 1967}}'' a trickster devil gives Stanley Moon seven wishes in return for his soul. Stanley is in love with Margaret so he wishes for them to be together. The Devil makes Margaret and Stanley nuns in love with each other; they're together in a nunnery nunnery, but since they're nuns they're celibate.



* From ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'':
-->'''Galahad''': I am sworn to chastity!\\
'''Woman''': Back to your bed at once!
* In ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'', we learn Lieutanant. Ilia has an "Oath of Celibacy", as she randomly informs Admiral Kirk of when she arrives on the Enterprise's bridge. Given Kirk's reputation as a ladies man it sounds like [[NotWhatItLooksLike she's warning him to back off]] but the [[AllThereInTheManual reason is explained]] in the {{novelization}}: Deltans (Ilia's race) are highly sexual and view humans as immature when it comes to sex, and more to the point having sex with a non-Deltan can potentially kill their partner (because it involves a blending of minds as well as bodies). Deltans are compelled to take a vow of celibacy in order to join Starfleet.

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* From ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'':
-->'''Galahad''':
''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'': Sir Galahad is known as "Sir Galahad the Pure", but the many women at Castle Anthrax eventually convince him to forget it.
-->'''Galahad:'''
I am sworn to chastity!\\
'''Woman''': '''Woman:''' Back to your bed at once!
** He's rescued ([[UnwantedRescue very unhappily]]) by Lancelot before actually violating it though.
* In ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'', we learn Lieutanant. Lieutenant Ilia has an "Oath of Celibacy", as she randomly informs Admiral Kirk of when she arrives on the Enterprise's bridge. Given Kirk's reputation as a ladies man it sounds like [[NotWhatItLooksLike she's warning him to back off]] off]], but the [[AllThereInTheManual reason is explained]] in the {{novelization}}: Deltans (Ilia's race) are highly sexual and view humans as immature when it comes to sex, and more to the point having sex with a non-Deltan can potentially kill their partner (because it involves a blending of minds as well as bodies). Deltans are compelled to take a vow of celibacy in order to join Starfleet.

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* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', Jolee Bindo reveals that he was once secretly married in defiance of his Jedi vow of celibacy, but his wife fell to the Dark Side, left him, and was killed fighting for the Sith Lord Exar Kun. Despite this, he argues to the PlayerCharacter that love itself is a good thing. In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'', the Exile remarks that by the time she was in the Order (a couple decades after Bindo), [[PersonAsVerb "pulling a Bindo"]] had become a slang term for leaving the Order for love.


** Wizards of Unseen University are generally expected to stay celibate. The common/official explanation is that it [[VirginPower interferes with their magic]], but as per the book ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'', it's more likely to be a measure to prevent wizards from having descendants, because the [[Main/MagicalSeventhSon eighth son of the eighth son of a wizard (himself an eighth son)]] is a dangerous super-wizard, and it's considered better to prevent wizards from having kids at all than to risk it. In later ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels the UU vow of celibacy seems to have shifted in the same way as [[{{Oxbridge}} Oxford and Cambridge Universities]] (see Real Life), in that wizards can have relations with women, but can't get married.

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** Wizards of Unseen University are generally expected to stay celibate. The common/official explanation is that it [[VirginPower interferes with their magic]], but as per the book ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'', it's more likely to be a measure to prevent wizards from having descendants, because the [[Main/MagicalSeventhSon eighth son of the eighth son of a wizard (himself an eighth son)]] is a dangerous super-wizard, and it's considered better to prevent wizards from having kids at all than to risk it. In later ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels the UU vow of celibacy seems to have shifted in the same way as [[{{Oxbridge}} [[{{UsefulNotes/Oxbridge}} Oxford and Cambridge Universities]] (see Real Life), in that wizards can have relations with women, but can't get married.



* Until the 1880s, [[{{Oxbridge}} Oxford and Cambridge Universities]] had a vow of celibacy for dons. This was originally because it was assumed that all scholars would have training as priests. However by the 18th century the definition of "celibacy" in this context had shifted; a Fellow of the College could have relations with women, but couldn't get married.

to:

* Until the 1880s, [[{{Oxbridge}} [[{{UsefulNotes/Oxbridge}} Oxford and Cambridge Universities]] had a vow of celibacy for dons. This was originally because it was assumed that all scholars would have training as priests. However by the 18th century the definition of "celibacy" in this context had shifted; a Fellow of the College could have relations with women, but couldn't get married.


* In ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'', we learn Lieutanant. Ilia has an "Oath of Celibacy", as she randomly informs Admiral Kirk of when she arrives on the Enterprise's bridge. Given Kirk's reputation as a ladies man it sounds like [[MistakenForPervert she's warning him to back off]] but the [[AllThereInTheManual reason is explained]] in the {{novelization}}: Deltans (Ilia's race) are highly sexual and view humans as immature when it comes to sex, and more to the point having sex with a non-Deltan can potentially kill their partner (because it involves a blending of minds as well as bodies). Deltans are compelled to take a vow of celibacy in order to join Starfleet.

to:

* In ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'', we learn Lieutanant. Ilia has an "Oath of Celibacy", as she randomly informs Admiral Kirk of when she arrives on the Enterprise's bridge. Given Kirk's reputation as a ladies man it sounds like [[MistakenForPervert [[NotWhatItLooksLike she's warning him to back off]] but the [[AllThereInTheManual reason is explained]] in the {{novelization}}: Deltans (Ilia's race) are highly sexual and view humans as immature when it comes to sex, and more to the point having sex with a non-Deltan can potentially kill their partner (because it involves a blending of minds as well as bodies). Deltans are compelled to take a vow of celibacy in order to join Starfleet.


* In ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'', we learn Lt. Ilia has an "Oath of Celibacy", as she randomly informs Admiral Kirk of when she arrives on the Enterprise's bridge. The story behind this is expanded upon in the {{novelization}}: Deltans (Ilia's race) are highly sexual and view humans as immature when it comes to sex, and more to the point having sex with a non-Deltan can potentially kill their partner (because it involves a blending of minds as well as bodies). Deltans are compelled to take a vow of celibacy in order to join Starfleet.

to:

* In ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'', we learn Lt.Lieutanant. Ilia has an "Oath of Celibacy", as she randomly informs Admiral Kirk of when she arrives on the Enterprise's bridge. The story behind this Given Kirk's reputation as a ladies man it sounds like [[MistakenForPervert she's warning him to back off]] but the [[AllThereInTheManual reason is expanded upon explained]] in the {{novelization}}: Deltans (Ilia's race) are highly sexual and view humans as immature when it comes to sex, and more to the point having sex with a non-Deltan can potentially kill their partner (because it involves a blending of minds as well as bodies). Deltans are compelled to take a vow of celibacy in order to join Starfleet.

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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'': Some orders of the Sisters of Battle don't actually require vows of celibacy or even chastity, but there's so many heretics to burn that the effect is much the same.


* Some Christian religious denominations require that their priests be celibate. The most well known of these is probably the Roman Catholic Church. However, other denominations, including most Protestant groups, have no such requirement and their pastors are free to marry. Some denominations take an intermediate approach -- Eastern Orthodoxy, for example, generally requires bishops to be celibate, but allows ordinary priests to be married provided the marriage predates their ordination.

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* Some Christian religious denominations require that their priests clergy be celibate. The most well known of these is probably the Roman Catholic Church. However, other denominations, including most Protestant groups, have no such requirement and their pastors are free to marry. Some denominations take an intermediate approach -- Eastern Orthodoxy, for example, generally requires bishops to be celibate, but allows ordinary priests to be married provided the marriage predates their ordination.



** This wasn't ''always'' a requirement of Catholic priests, and technically is not a dogma of the Church (that is, something held to be an infallible truth, belief in which is a fundamental requirement of Catholicism and denial of which would be innately heretical). Thus, it's technically possible that any future Pope could abolish the requirement. But celibacy of the priesthood has become such a deep-rooted tradition of the Church that's it's highly unlikely this would happen. [[note]] Originally, it was a policy put in place to curb {{Nepotism}}, as Popes/priests/bishops/etc. of the time were passing their position onto their sons, whether or not those sons were qualified. Saying that priests could not be married, and could not have sexual relationships, was a way of solving that problem, that became part of a larger part of tradition, by depicting it as a worthy sacrifice. [[/note]]

to:

** This wasn't ''always'' a requirement of Catholic priests, and technically is not a dogma of the Church (that is, something held to be an infallible truth, belief in which is a fundamental requirement of Catholicism and denial of which would be innately heretical). Thus, it's technically possible that any future Pope could abolish the requirement. But celibacy of the priesthood has become such a deep-rooted tradition of the Church that's it's highly unlikely this would happen. [[note]] Originally, [[note]]Originally, it was a policy put in place to curb {{Nepotism}}, as Popes/priests/bishops/etc. of the time were passing their position onto on to their sons, whether or not those sons were qualified. Saying that priests could not be married, and could not have sexual relationships, was a way of solving that problem, that became part of a larger part of tradition, by depicting it as a worthy sacrifice. [[/note]]



* There has also been Catholics who practice spiritual or Josephite marriage (the latter name is from the dogma that Mary and Joseph had a marriage like this) where the couple agree to be abstinent. It has to be a freely-made mutual decision however.
* Islam and Judaism have tended to frown on celibacy, although there are exceptions.
* Ancient Rome had the Vestal Virgins, for whom the punishment the loss of their main qualification was being put to death by live burial. The Vestals' vow was time-limited; they were inducted at the age of 10 or younger and required to be celibate for 30 years, at which point they were retired from the job not only allowed but expected to marry and have children; the [[HighPriest Pontifex Maximus]] would arrange marriages between newly-retired Vestals and high-ranking nobles.

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* There has are also been some Catholics who practice spiritual or Josephite marriage (the latter name is from the dogma that Mary and Joseph had a marriage like this) where the couple agree to be abstinent. It has to be a freely-made mutual decision however.
* Islam and Judaism have tended to frown on celibacy, although there are exceptions.
exceptions. Some of the Sufi Muslims, for instance, have practiced it.
* Ancient Rome had the Vestal Virgins, for to whom the punishment for the loss of their main qualification was being put to death by live burial. The Vestals' vow was time-limited; they were inducted at the age of 10 or younger and required to be celibate for 30 years, at which point they were retired from the job and not only allowed but expected to marry and have children; the [[HighPriest Pontifex Maximus]] would arrange marriages between newly-retired Vestals and high-ranking nobles.



* The Shakers, a Christian sect that thrived mostly in the 1800s, required all members to remain celibate. As you'd expect, they have all but died out.

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* The Shakers, a Christian sect that thrived mostly in the 1800s, required all members to remain celibate. As you'd expect, they have all but died out. Initially, they got new members through conversion, but once that stopped their days were numbered.


Some organizations require that their members refrain from marriage or sexual relations. It's particularly common in religious groups -- some churches bar their priests from such things, and most monastic traditions forbid them as well. Typically, these restrictions will take the form of a vow of celibacy (although simply making celibacy a rule, without anyone swearing anything, has basically the same effect).

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Some organizations require that their members refrain from marriage or sexual relations. It's particularly common in religious groups -- some churches bar their priests clergy from such things, and most monastic traditions forbid them as well. Typically, these restrictions will take the form of a vow of celibacy (although simply making celibacy a rule, without anyone swearing anything, has basically the same effect).



* ''Film/KeepingTheFaith'' has Brian, a Catholic priest, develop feelings for his childhood friend Anna. He falsely convinces himself that his feelings are reciprocated, and wonders about his future in the church. In fact, Anna is in a secret relationship with their mutual friend (who's a rabbi, but they have aren't sworn to celibacy).

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* ''Film/KeepingTheFaith'' has Brian, a Catholic priest, develop feelings for his childhood friend Anna. He falsely convinces himself that his feelings are reciprocated, and wonders about his future in the church. In fact, Anna is in a secret relationship with their mutual friend (who's a rabbi, but they have aren't sworn to celibacy).celibacy, though extramarital relationships are still frowned upon usually).


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* ''{{Film/Ironclad}}'': Marshall took one as a member of UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar, but he eventually breaks it by sleeping with Isabel, which he feels quite guilty for.

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