Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / VikingFuneral

Go To


Added DiffLines:

In real life, vikings (or Norsemen in general) practiced a variety of ship-themed funerals which included burying an entire ship (which is great because that has allowed for exact reconstructions in modern times) to cremation aboard a boat and in the case the wealth elite, a ship. The idea of the ship being put to sea only occurs in a single mythic event: Baldr's funeral. Then again, it goes without saying that such a funeral would leave no traces.


* On ''Manga/OnePiece'', the Straw Hat Pirates do this for the ''Going Merry'', their first ship, after it has become too damaged to repair and keep seaworthy.

to:

* On ''Manga/OnePiece'', the Straw Hat Pirates do this not for a person, but for the ''Going Merry'', their first ship, after it has become too damaged to repair and keep seaworthy.




Added DiffLines:

* A skit in ''Machinima/Supermarioglitchy4sSuperMario64Bloopers'' has Mario and [=SMG4=] taking the first batch of their online merchandise onto a boat and pushing it out to sea before burning it with a flame arrow to make room for their new merchandise.


* The vikings themselves (duh) as reported by Ahmad ibn Fadlan, though, it was generally reserved only for really remarkable chieftains and warlords. Usually the Norsemen simply either interred their dead or cremated them and interred the ashes. If a boat was used, it usually was a simple rowing boat, and it was often used simply as a casket. The reason is [[CaptainObvious obvious]]: boats, and more so ships, are expensive investments and of more use in mundane and martial tasks than as funerary implements. To be more practical, the vikings would sometimes instead build fake [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_ship Stone ships]] and bury their dead in them, instead of burning real ones. Sometimes, the ship was burned on land and a mound was raised above it. The religious idea behind it was simply that the deceased would travel in the ship to the other side. And sometimes they where buried with a horse so they could ride there.

to:

* The vikings themselves (duh) as reported by Ahmad ibn Fadlan, though, it was generally reserved only for really remarkable chieftains and warlords. Usually the Norsemen simply either interred their dead or cremated them and interred the ashes. If a boat was used, it usually was a simple rowing boat, and it was often used simply as a casket. The reason is [[CaptainObvious obvious]]: obvious: boats, and more so ships, are expensive investments and of more use in mundane and martial tasks than as funerary implements. To be more practical, the vikings would sometimes instead build fake [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_ship Stone ships]] and bury their dead in them, instead of burning real ones. Sometimes, the ship was burned on land and a mound was raised above it. The religious idea behind it was simply that the deceased would travel in the ship to the other side. And sometimes they where buried with a horse so they could ride there.

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Fan Works]]
* Attempted in ''Fanfic/{{Nutricula}}'', for [[Manga/MyHeroAcademia Midoriya's]] severed body parts, [[spoiler:but it turns out that he's NotQuiteDead]].
[[/folder]]


In some cases (as in real history), the fire-arrow step isn't performed. This can be due to a lack of flammable sails and fire arrows, a need for haste, or simply different funerary practices. A third (also more accurate) variant exists in which the boat is not [[BurialAtSea set out to sea]], but instead used to lay the corpse in for a [[BurnBabyBurn funeral pyre]]. And finally, Viking funerals need not be literal. Many examples feature metaphorical stand-ins for any of the aspects of the ritual.

to:

In some cases (as in real history), the fire-arrow step isn't performed. This can be due to a lack of flammable sails and fire arrows, a need for haste, or simply different funerary practices. A third (also more accurate) variant exists in which the boat is not [[BurialAtSea set out to sea]], but instead used to lay the corpse in for a [[BurnBabyBurn funeral pyre]].pyre. And finally, Viking funerals need not be literal. Many examples feature metaphorical stand-ins for any of the aspects of the ritual.



* [[BurnBabyBurn Cremation on a pyre]] is the traditional funerary rite for Jedi in the ''Film/StarWars'' films, the most iconic being Darth Vader's at the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi''.

to:

* [[BurnBabyBurn Cremation on a pyre]] pyre is the traditional funerary rite for Jedi in the ''Film/StarWars'' films, the most iconic being Darth Vader's at the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi''.


* [[https://warhammerfantasy.fandom.com/wiki/Norsca The Norscans]] of [[TabletopGame/Warhammer Warhammer Fantasy Battle fame]], being the most over-the-top of over-the-top HornyVikings naturally have this form of burial. In the ''Legend of Sigmar'' novels for instance, they cremate a fallen Chaos Lord in his longship just before the titular Sigmar arrives to crash the funeral.

to:

* [[https://warhammerfantasy.fandom.com/wiki/Norsca The Norscans]] of [[TabletopGame/Warhammer [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Warhammer Fantasy Battle fame]], being the most over-the-top of over-the-top HornyVikings naturally have this form of burial. In the ''Legend of Sigmar'' novels for instance, they cremate a fallen Chaos Lord in his longship just before the titular Sigmar arrives to crash the funeral. While in the ''Slaves to Darkness'' trilogy, they merely put their fallen warriors on pyres and start roaring to the heavens, in an act that you'd be forgiven for thinking was cribbed straight from the Klingons on Star Trek.

Added DiffLines:

* [[https://warhammerfantasy.fandom.com/wiki/Norsca The Norscans]] of [[TabletopGame/Warhammer Warhammer Fantasy Battle fame]], being the most over-the-top of over-the-top HornyVikings naturally have this form of burial. In the ''Legend of Sigmar'' novels for instance, they cremate a fallen Chaos Lord in his longship just before the titular Sigmar arrives to crash the funeral.

Added DiffLines:

* Violently destroying an object (especially electronics and appliances) rather than just throwing it away is often referred to as giving it a viking funeral. Fire and boat are optional, but encouraged. Usually this is also reserved of a higher (initial) value that have "served dutifully" before dying (breaking or being replaced).

Added DiffLines:

* The concept is discussed by a mortician [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQJOs8rm6xM here]], including why it's illegal: a fire on a boat is not actually hot enough to cremate a body, so the result would be a lot of charred corpse chunks washing up on shore. She suggests an alternative: cremate the body in a conventional way, then put the ashes in a small boat and burn that (if the waterway allows it, of course).


* ''Film/ItRunsInTheFamily'' (2003) features a Viking funeral that is both a TearJerker and one of the [[FunnyMoments funniest scenes]] in the film, particularly because it is set in modern day New York City.

to:

* ''Film/ItRunsInTheFamily'' (2003) features a Viking funeral that is both a TearJerker and one of the [[FunnyMoments [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments funniest scenes]] in the film, particularly because it is set in modern day New York City.

Added DiffLines:

* In an episode of ''WebAnimation/CampCamp'', when Nikki thinks that she's going to die (long story, and [[spoiler:she's actually on her period]]), she requests that her friends do this to her...[[MurderByCremation when she's still alive]]. Fortunately, Nurf is a terrible shot.

Added DiffLines:

* Although not actually a ''funeral'', the Shetland festival of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Up_Helly_Aa Up Helly Aa]] certainly owes some inspiration to the idea, involving locals dressing up as Vikings and culminating in the burning of a replica longship.


* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': In "Frybo", after Steven's attempt to animate the costume of the fry stand's eponymous mascot goes horribly wrong, what's left of Frybo get pushed out to sea in a burning boat. With [[ItMakesSenseInContext Steven's animated clothing]] acting as the pallbearers.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': In "Frybo", after Steven's attempt to animate the costume of the fry stand's eponymous mascot goes horribly wrong, Mr. Fryman has what's left of Frybo get pushed out to sea in a burning boat. raft. With [[ItMakesSenseInContext Steven's animated clothing]] acting as the pallbearers.pallbearers.
-->'''Mr. Fryman:''' As greasy in death as he was in life...


* The Silver Horde in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'' plan to give [[spoiler:Teach]] such a funeral. In fact they plan to give him every barbarian funeral they can think of.

to:

* The Silver Horde in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'' plan to give [[spoiler:Teach]] such a funeral. In fact fact, they plan to give him every barbarian funeral they can think of.



* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' sees what's left of Frybo get this treatment after [[spoiler: Peedee and Steven finish him off]] in his namesake episode.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' sees ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': In "Frybo", after Steven's attempt to animate the costume of the fry stand's eponymous mascot goes horribly wrong, what's left of Frybo get this treatment after [[spoiler: Peedee and Steven finish him off]] pushed out to sea in his namesake episode.a burning boat. With [[ItMakesSenseInContext Steven's animated clothing]] acting as the pallbearers.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 188

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report