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* ''Theatre/SomethingRotten'' contains rapid-fire streams of references to other musicals in songs like "A Musical" as well as the titular song. Theatre-goers unfamilliar with the last fifty years of musical theatre may find little more than dick jokes left for them after so many references fall flat.


-->'''Yakko and siblings:''' Time Is relative, dependent you can save it, you can spend it doing things you like to do or learning how. You can't see it, you can't taste it but you certainly can waste it which is really what were doing here right now.

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-->'''Yakko --->'''Yakko and siblings:''' Time Is relative, dependent you dependent\\
You
can save it, you can spend it doing it\\
Doing
things you like to do or learning how. how.\\
You can't see it, you can't taste it but it\\
But
you certainly can waste it which it\\
Which
is really what were we're doing here right now. now!



-->'''Yakko and siblings:''' So remember, when you're traveling from Nantucket to St. Paul, in that airport as you're staring at those clocks upon the wall, You should think about this song, my friend, And then you will recall...that it was mildly amusing, but then totally confusing and we bet you wish we never sung at all!

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-->'''Yakko --->'''Yakko and siblings:''' So remember, when you're traveling from traveling\\
From
Nantucket to St. Paul, in Paul\\
In
that airport as you're staring at staring\\
At
those clocks upon the wall, wall\\
You should think about this song, my friend, friend\\
And then you will recall...that \\
That
it was mildly amusing, but amusing\\
But
then totally confusing and confusin\\
And
we bet you wish we never sung at all!


* Creator/EddieIzzard mixes obscure history and references to science and philosophy into his stand-up, and goes so far as to conduct an entire 5 minute sketch in French, in front of American and British audiences.

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* Creator/EddieIzzard mixes obscure history and references to science and philosophy into his stand-up, and goes so far as to conduct an entire 5 minute sketch in French, in front of American and British audiences. He even lampshades this last bit, telling the audience that they don't understand anything he's saying, and are only laughing because French sounds funny


* Seminal Scottish post-punk band (the) Scars released a single in 1979 called "Horrorshow", that relies on one having previously either watched the film of or read the book of Anthony Burgess's ''Clockwork Orange'', as the song title indicates. The band, as short-lived as they may have been, were very literary-minded and supremely precocious (being a band of ''teenagers'') and assumed their fans/listeners would be as well.

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* Seminal Scottish post-punk band (the) Scars released a single in 1979 called "Horrorshow", that relies on one having previously either watched the film of or read the book of Anthony Burgess's ''Clockwork Orange'', as the song title indicates. The band, as short-lived as they may have been, were very literary-minded and supremely precocious (being a band of ''teenagers'') and assumed their fans/listeners would be as well.

Added DiffLines:

* Seminal Scottish post-punk band (the) Scars released a single in 1979 called "Horrorshow", that relies on one having previously either watched the film of or read the book of Anthony Burgess's ''Clockwork Orange'', as the song title indicates. The band, as short-lived as they may have been, were very literary-minded and supremely precocious (being a band of ''teenagers'') and assumed their fans/listeners would be as well.


* Music/DavidBowie's music references everything from art-house movies, underground musicians, Creator/BertoltBrecht, French chanson, and yet he was incredibly commercially successful.

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* Music/DavidBowie's music references everything from art-house movies, movies and underground musicians, Creator/BertoltBrecht, musicians to Creator/BertoltBrecht and French chanson, chansons, and yet he was incredibly commercially successful.


** Plenty of books use this effect, such as Heinlein's ''Time for the Stars'' and Joe Haldeman's ''The Forever War''.


** It gets worse. Russo wrote for Wrestling/{{TNA}}, when Wrestling/HulkHogan, Wrestling/RicFlair, Wrestling/JeffJarrett, Wrestling/{{Sting}}, and Wrestling/EricBischoff were all prominent talent. So, naturally, the focus of the main event TNA storyline is the "shadow politics" that were going on in WCW. Meaning, not only did you have to be a smark to know what's going on, you had to have been a smark FOR OVER 10 YEARS. And even then, there were bound to be references you didn't get, considering they're talking about everything up to and including private drunken phone calls from years ago. And no, none of this makes for halfway compelling, or even coherent, television.

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** It gets worse. Russo wrote for Wrestling/{{TNA}}, [[Wrestling/ImpactWrestling TNA]], when Wrestling/HulkHogan, Wrestling/RicFlair, Wrestling/JeffJarrett, Wrestling/{{Sting}}, and Wrestling/EricBischoff were all prominent talent. So, naturally, the focus of the main event TNA storyline is the "shadow politics" that were going on in WCW. Meaning, not only did you have to be a smark to know what's going on, you had to have been a smark FOR OVER 10 YEARS. And even then, there were bound to be references you didn't get, considering they're talking about everything up to and including private drunken phone calls from years ago. And no, none of this makes for halfway compelling, or even coherent, television.


* About the only promotion that does it right is Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}, since, rather than talk down to their audience or attempt to confuse them with hopelessly obscure insider information, the wrestlers and announcers will sprinkle the matches with a dizzyingly fun mix of {{Shout Out}}s and {{Take That}}s covering pro wrestling and pop culture in general (EVERYTHING from ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' to ''[=Yo! MTV Raps=]'' to Music/LadyGaga to ''Theatre/{{RENT}}'' and the list goes on and on from there), not to mention naming shows after Music/TalkingHeads albums, [[Music/BenFolds Ben Folds Five]] songs and Music/JoniMitchell lyrics (''Through Savage Progress Cuts the Jungle Line''), that the combination requires a ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' [[JustForFun/XMeetsY meets]] Creator/QuentinTarantino [[JustForFun/XMeetsY meets]] Wrestling/JoeyStyles-level of cultural and wrestling awareness and attention span.

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* About the only promotion that does it right is Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}, since, rather than talk down to their audience or attempt to confuse them with hopelessly obscure insider information, the wrestlers and announcers will sprinkle the matches with a [[ReferenceOverdosed dizzyingly fun mix mix]] of {{Shout Out}}s and {{Take That}}s covering pro wrestling and pop culture in general (EVERYTHING from ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' to ''[=Yo! MTV Raps=]'' to Music/LadyGaga to ''Theatre/{{RENT}}'' and the list goes on and on from there), not to mention naming shows after Music/TalkingHeads albums, [[Music/BenFolds Ben Folds Five]] songs and Music/JoniMitchell lyrics (''Through Savage Progress Cuts the Jungle Line''), that the combination requires a ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' [[JustForFun/XMeetsY meets]] Creator/QuentinTarantino [[JustForFun/XMeetsY meets]] Wrestling/JoeyStyles-level of cultural and wrestling awareness and attention span.


* The Music/{{Queen}} song "39." It is a very strange surreal sounding story, unless you know the key to its interpretation, not spelled out in the song itself: Relativistic time dilation at velocities near that of light (appropriately, band member Brian May is an astrophysicist). The protagonist of the song is an astronaut who has travelled across the "milky seas" (Milky Way -- the galaxy) looking for habitable planets. In his own time only one year has passed, but simultaneously 100 years have gone by at home at Earth. All his friends and relatives have passed away, and only his daughter, who was an infant when he left, remains. The protagonist laments that he has his full life ahead, but nobody to share it with.

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* The Music/{{Queen}} song "39." It "39" is a very strange surreal sounding story, unless you know the key to its interpretation, not spelled out in the song itself: Relativistic relativistic time dilation at velocities near that of light (appropriately, band member Brian May is an astrophysicist). The protagonist of the song is an astronaut who has travelled across the "milky seas" (Milky Way -- the galaxy) looking for habitable planets. In his own time For the crew only one year has passed, but simultaneously 100 years for Earth they have been gone by at home at Earth. All his friends and relatives have passed away, and only his daughter, who was an infant when he left, remains. so long that nearly everyone they knew is dead. The protagonist laments that he has his full life ahead, but nobody to share it with.with.
** Plenty of books use this effect, such as Heinlein's ''Time for the Stars'' and Joe Haldeman's ''The Forever War''.

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* ''Film/CaptiveState'': Surprisingly little exposition, [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a large cast]], and a lot of unanswered questions.


** One doesn't need an intimate knowledge of Batman's relationship with the Joker to understand the whole story, but it does explain certain moments, and can create a bit of DramaticIrony as you watch [[SmallNameBigEgo Jonny Frost]] (Joker's latest henchman) believe he's on [[UnwittingPawn top of the world with the Joker]] when [[EvilIsNotAToy nothing could be further from the truth.]] There are unexplained moments when Joker is looking around or asking others to look around for him, always commenting that [[Franchise/{{Batman}} ''someone'']] is watching him. The very first time it happens, it appears as if he's staring back at Arkham Asylum as he is released. [[spoiler: In reality, you can spot a hidden Batman among the gargoyles of Arkham, [[http://static.comicvine.com/uploads/original/0/3695/110324-163303-batman.gif like much of his promotional art.]] The second time is harder to spot, in the shadows on a rooftop while Joker and Jonny drive below him.]]

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** One doesn't need an intimate knowledge of Batman's Franchise/{{Batman}}'s relationship with the Joker ComicBook/TheJoker to understand the whole story, but it does explain certain moments, and can create a bit of DramaticIrony as you watch [[SmallNameBigEgo Jonny Frost]] (Joker's latest henchman) believe he's on [[UnwittingPawn top of the world with the Joker]] when [[EvilIsNotAToy nothing could be further from the truth.]] There are unexplained moments when Joker is looking around or asking others to look around for him, always commenting that [[Franchise/{{Batman}} ''someone'']] is watching him. The very first time it happens, it appears as if he's staring back at Arkham Asylum as he is released. [[spoiler: In reality, you can spot a hidden Batman among the gargoyles of Arkham, [[http://static.comicvine.com/uploads/original/0/3695/110324-163303-batman.gif like much of his promotional art.]] The second time is harder to spot, in the shadows on a rooftop while Joker and Jonny drive below him.]]


* Kit Williams' ''[[Literature/KitWilliamsMasquerade Masquerade]]'' was ostensibly a children's book in which the illustrations provided clues to the burial location of the jewelled golden hare featured in the story. Williams claimed that a child of ten with a good understanding of language, mathematics, and astronomy would be just as likely to solve the puzzle as an {{Oxbridge}} don. The puzzle remained unsolved for nearly three years, and the two people who finally cracked it were physics teachers.[[note]] Not that this was enough for them to win the contest; the actual contest winner had done so not by solving the puzzle, but by exploiting a chain of personal connections between Williams and himself.[[/note]] Even now that the method behind the solution has been thoroughly documented and published, it still leaves many readers scratching their heads, wondering "How was ''anyone'' supposed to solve this??"

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* Kit Williams' ''[[Literature/KitWilliamsMasquerade Masquerade]]'' was ostensibly a children's book in which the illustrations provided clues to the burial location of the jewelled golden hare featured in the story. Williams claimed that a child of ten with a good understanding of language, mathematics, and astronomy would be just as likely to solve the puzzle as an {{Oxbridge}} {{UsefulNotes/Oxbridge}} don. The puzzle remained unsolved for nearly three years, and the two people who finally cracked it were physics teachers.[[note]] Not that this was enough for them to win the contest; the actual contest winner had done so not by solving the puzzle, but by exploiting a chain of personal connections between Williams and himself.[[/note]] Even now that the method behind the solution has been thoroughly documented and published, it still leaves many readers scratching their heads, wondering "How was ''anyone'' supposed to solve this??"


* Series/SchittsCreek: Like ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' before it, the show's humor often derives from urbane people interacting with working class people and contains many silly jokes that most audience members would understand. However, the show's attention to detail, such as the Rose family wearing authentic designer clothing that was made before the Roses lost their wealth, and the way it often layers references into both plot and dialogue rewards viewers who pay careful attention and/or are keyed into various subcultures.

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* Series/SchittsCreek: ''Series/SchittsCreek'': Like ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' before it, the show's humor often derives from urbane people interacting with working class people and contains many silly jokes that most audience members would understand. However, the show's attention to detail, such as the Rose family wearing authentic designer clothing that was made before the Roses lost their wealth, and the way it often layers references into both plot and dialogue rewards viewers who pay careful attention and/or are keyed into various subcultures.


* ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective'' has got a ''very'' subtle one when it comes to Ratigan's DisneyVillainDeath. His ''foot'' slides on the clock hand of ''Big Ben'' when ''10 p.m.'' strikes, causing him to fall to his death. You don't get it ? We can't blame you. A not very well-known outside of England fact is that at ''11 p.m.'', there is a little tune playing in Big Ben. An even lesser-known fact is that there are actually lyrics written for this tune. What are they ?

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* ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective'' has got a ''very'' subtle one when it comes to Ratigan's DisneyVillainDeath. His ''foot'' slides on the clock hand of ''Big Ben'' when ''10 p.m.'' strikes, causing him to fall to his death. You don't get it ? it? We can't blame you. A not very well-known outside of England fact is that at ''11 p.m.'', there is a little tune playing in Big Ben. An even lesser-known fact is that there are actually lyrics written for this tune. What are they ?they?

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