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** [[spoiler:Ayanami Rei]] in actually appears as three different clones over the course of the show. This isn't known until TheReveal.

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** [[spoiler:Ayanami Rei]] in actually appears as three different clones over the course of the show. This isn't known until TheReveal.


* Shadow from ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' was revealed to be possibly a clone of the one from ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' at the end of ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes''. The other two members of Team Dark discovers a lab full clones in tubes, and destroy them all without telling him. Rouge reveals she knew he was a copy the entire time. This being the first game after Sega went third-party, the writing hadn't ''completely'' started to suck yet.
** Of course, this was all retconned in ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'' with the explanation that Eggman had sent a robot to recover his body after he [[NoOneCouldSurviveThat visibly burned to death falling to earth from an orbiting space station]]. Yeah.
*** Although, it would make sense that he's the original, as he was kept in a completely separate location from the other copies, and later on Sonic survives a similar situation , so surely the UltimateLifeform could do the same.

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* Shadow from ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' was revealed to be possibly a clone of the one from ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' In ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'', at the end of ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes''. The other two members of Team Dark discovers Dark’s story, Rouge and Omega stumble upon a lab room full of Shadow clones sealed in tubes, and destroy them all without telling him. Rouge reveals she knew he the same kind of sleep as Shadow was a copy at the entire time. This being beginning of the first game after Sega went third-party, the writing hadn't ''completely'' started to suck yet.
** Of course, this was all retconned in ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'' with the explanation
game, implying that Shadow may also have been a clone, especially given that he seemingly died at the end of ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2''. In ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'', however, Eggman had sent a robot to recover his body after he [[NoOneCouldSurviveThat visibly burned to death falling to earth from an orbiting space station]]. Yeah.
*** Although, it would make sense
confirms that he's the original, as he Shadow going through the events of those games was kept in a completely separate location from the other copies, and later on Sonic survives a similar situation , so surely the UltimateLifeform could do the same.original all along.

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* A mysterious alien artifact in the space arc of ''Webcomic/ArthurKingOfTimeAndSpace'' appears to have this as its only function. In-universe, the reason for this is unknown, out-of-universe it's to set up the space arc version of the False Guenevere story.


* While actual teleportation is possible in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the wormgate network used for it prior to the invention of the teraport also created clones of those who used it without the traveler's knowledge.[[note]]It's (strongly) implied that the gates only do this due to an added logic function: send the original to their destination, and produce the copy at a preset location, using energy from a local star to make the needed mass.[[/note]] This became a major plot point when it turned out the Gatekeepers were interrogating and executing the clones, and using the information gained to control the galaxy's wealth and suppress rival teleporter technology. The current Kevyn Andreyasn is a clone created in this manner shortly before the original made a HeroicSacrifice, who simply took over his original's life without a single care about the existential issues. He ''did'' put it on his resume, though. Similarly, later on Schlock is killed off, and a new Schlock is created to replace him. The new Schlock thinks it's kind of cool, "but not cool enough to do twice." Eventually [[spoiler:the technology to do this comes into common use throughout the galaxy. Suddenly ''everyone'' starts cheating death through cloning, prompting a few identity crises. Captain Tagon's clone is quite emphatic that he's not the same person who carried a ship-to-ship missile into a enemy beachhead, because he was produced from a backup taken over fifty hours earlier.]]

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* While actual teleportation is possible in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the wormgate network used for it prior to the invention of the teraport also created clones of those who used it without the traveler's knowledge.[[note]]It's (strongly) implied that the gates only do this due to an added logic function: send the original to their destination, and produce the copy at a preset location, using energy from a local star to make the needed mass.[[/note]] This became a major plot point when it turned out the Gatekeepers were interrogating and executing the clones, and using the information gained to control the galaxy's wealth and suppress rival teleporter technology. The current Kevyn Andreyasn is a clone created in this manner shortly before the original made a HeroicSacrifice, who simply took over his original's life without a single care about the existential issues. He ''did'' put it on his resume, though. Similarly, later on Schlock is killed off, and a new Schlock is created to replace him. The new Schlock thinks it's kind of cool, "but not cool enough to do twice." Eventually [[spoiler:the technology to do this comes into common use throughout the galaxy. Suddenly ''everyone'' starts cheating death through cloning, prompting a few identity crises. Captain Tagon's clone is quite emphatic that he's not the same person who carried a ship-to-ship missile into a enemy beachhead, because he was produced from a mind backup taken over fifty hours around 45 minutes earlier.]]


* While actual teleportation is possible in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the wormgate network used for it prior to the invention of the teraport also created clones of those who used it without the traveler's knowledge. This became a major plot point when it turned out the Gatekeepers were interrogating and executing the clones, and using the information gained to control the galaxy's wealth and suppress rival teleporter technology. The current Kevyn Andreyasn is a clone created in this manner shortly before the original made a HeroicSacrifice, who simply took over his original's life without a single care about the existential issues. He ''did'' put it on his resume, though. Similarly, later on Schlock is killed off, and a new Schlock is created to replace him. The new Schlock thinks it's kind of cool, "but not cool enough to do twice." Eventually [[spoiler:the technology to do this comes into common use throughout the galaxy. Suddenly ''everyone'' starts cheating death through cloning, prompting a few identity crises. Captain Tagon's clone is quite emphatic that he's not the same person who carried a ship-to-ship missile into a enemy beachhead, because he was produced from a backup taken over fifty hours earlier.]]

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* While actual teleportation is possible in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the wormgate network used for it prior to the invention of the teraport also created clones of those who used it without the traveler's knowledge. [[note]]It's (strongly) implied that the gates only do this due to an added logic function: send the original to their destination, and produce the copy at a preset location, using energy from a local star to make the needed mass.[[/note]] This became a major plot point when it turned out the Gatekeepers were interrogating and executing the clones, and using the information gained to control the galaxy's wealth and suppress rival teleporter technology. The current Kevyn Andreyasn is a clone created in this manner shortly before the original made a HeroicSacrifice, who simply took over his original's life without a single care about the existential issues. He ''did'' put it on his resume, though. Similarly, later on Schlock is killed off, and a new Schlock is created to replace him. The new Schlock thinks it's kind of cool, "but not cool enough to do twice." Eventually [[spoiler:the technology to do this comes into common use throughout the galaxy. Suddenly ''everyone'' starts cheating death through cloning, prompting a few identity crises. Captain Tagon's clone is quite emphatic that he's not the same person who carried a ship-to-ship missile into a enemy beachhead, because he was produced from a backup taken over fifty hours earlier.]]

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* In ''ComicBook/{{Transmetropolitan}}'' the telefactor speed-grows a clone of the subject and forms a telepathic link between them so the clone acts as a RemoteBody while in use. Spider uses it to covertly meet with the President's wife on the other side of the country without the Secret Service noticing him leaving the City.


* While actual teleportation is possible in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the wormgate network used for it prior to the invention of the teraport also created clones of those who used it without the traveler's knowledge. [[spoiler:This became a major plot point when it turned out the Gatekeepers were interrogating and executing the clones, and using the information gained to control the galaxy's wealth and suppress rival teleporter technology. The current Kevyn Andreyasn is a clone created in this manner shortly before the original made a HeroicSacrifice, who simply took over his original's life without a single care about the existential issues. He ''did'' put it on his resume, though.]] Similarly, later on [[spoiler:Schlock is killed off, and a new Schlock is created to replace him. The new Schlock thinks it's kind of cool, "but not cool enough to do twice."]] Eventually [[spoiler:the technology to do this comes into common use throughout the galaxy. Suddenly ''everyone'' starts cheating death through cloning.]]

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* While actual teleportation is possible in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', the wormgate network used for it prior to the invention of the teraport also created clones of those who used it without the traveler's knowledge. [[spoiler:This This became a major plot point when it turned out the Gatekeepers were interrogating and executing the clones, and using the information gained to control the galaxy's wealth and suppress rival teleporter technology. The current Kevyn Andreyasn is a clone created in this manner shortly before the original made a HeroicSacrifice, who simply took over his original's life without a single care about the existential issues. He ''did'' put it on his resume, though.]] Similarly, later on [[spoiler:Schlock Schlock is killed off, and a new Schlock is created to replace him. The new Schlock thinks it's kind of cool, "but not cool enough to do twice."]] " Eventually [[spoiler:the technology to do this comes into common use throughout the galaxy. Suddenly ''everyone'' starts cheating death through cloning.cloning, prompting a few identity crises. Captain Tagon's clone is quite emphatic that he's not the same person who carried a ship-to-ship missile into a enemy beachhead, because he was produced from a backup taken over fifty hours earlier.]]


* Sam Vimes objects to using magic anyway, but in ''Discworld/{{Thud}}!'', even when he gives in and goes to the wizards for help, he absolutely refuses to use teleportation because he's paranoid about the idea that the person at the other end isn't the same person as the one who was teleported. Considering Rincewind once got badly battered by oncoming debris ''mid-transit'' during a teleport, Vimes's fear probably wasn't justified, but the Wizzard wasn't on hand to point this out.

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* Sam Vimes objects to using magic anyway, but in ''Discworld/{{Thud}}!'', ''Literature/{{Thud}}!'', even when he gives in and goes to the wizards for help, he absolutely refuses to use teleportation because he's paranoid about the idea that the person at the other end isn't the same person as the one who was teleported. Considering Rincewind once got badly battered by oncoming debris ''mid-transit'' during a teleport, Vimes's fear probably wasn't justified, but the Wizzard wasn't on hand to point this out.


** Like many devices introduced in the series, this {{Twinmaker}} is never mentioned again, even though it would have been very helpful in many other circumstances.

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** Like many devices introduced in the series, this {{Twinmaker}} is never mentioned again, even though it would have been very helpful in many other circumstances.


Second, the ethics of disposing of the original: If this matter is addressed at all in fiction, the UniquenessValue and CloningBlues tropes may well be invoked or played with as part of the story. A teleportation machine that worked in the manner of the short story ''To Be'' (see quotation above) would probably be regarded as a killing machine, but if there is any doubt about whether the stream-of-consciousness continues or not, the issue may well be sidestepped. If nothing in the device suggests anything sinister, it's generally treated as harmless. It's probably a straightforward {{teleportation}}.

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Second, the ethics of disposing of the original: If this matter is addressed at all in fiction, the UniquenessValue and CloningBlues tropes may well be invoked or played with as part of the story. A teleportation machine that worked in the manner of the short story ''To Be'' (see quotation above) would probably be regarded as a killing machine, but if there is any doubt about whether the stream-of-consciousness continues or not, the issue may well be sidestepped. If nothing in the device suggests anything sinister, it's generally treated as harmless. It's probably a straightforward {{teleportation}}.
harmless.


The concept of clones or copies being made to replace original people, usually either as a means of {{teleportation}} ([[DestructiveTeleportation by creating a copy somewhere else and destroying the original]]) or as a way of obtaining {{immortality}} ([[BodyBackupDrive creating clones to replace a dying or dead original]], for example).

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The concept of clones or copies being made to replace original people, usually either as a means of {{teleportation}} ([[DestructiveTeleportation to [[DestructiveTeleportation teleport by creating a copy somewhere else and destroying the original]]) original]] or as a way of obtaining {{immortality}} ([[BodyBackupDrive [[BodyBackupDrive creating clones to replace a dying or dead original]], for example).
original]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{VVVVVV}}'' has a number of teleporters, and while it doesn't really explore the mechanics or morality of them (they're just a gameplay mechanic), one of the rooms containing a teleporter is named "Murdering Twinmaker" as a direct reference to the trope.


* An interesting variant occurs in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' with [[{{Teleportation}} Oni Lee]]. Whenever Lee teleports, his new body is formed at the target destination and his old body continues on for several seconds before dissolving into carbon ash. But those seconds can be a long time in combat...



* In ''VideoGame/SystemShock'', the main character can perform a DNA upload in a cloning booth. Then, if they die, they are cloned at the booth with the stats they had while they were there last, like a checkpoint.
** Isn't it a 'quantum entanglement booth' - it's explained as being something closer to teleporting, though that isn't what 'quantum entanglement' really means.
** In ''System Shock 2'' it's called a "Quantum Bio-Reconstruction Machine." So more of a clone box, not a teleporter.
** The Voice in the Cupboard does explain it in terms that make you think teleporter though. Reconstruction isn't specific to cloning.
** Shodan/Polito says that it will "rebuild your body ''from scratch''." Which to me sounds like starting over from your DNA sample alone, or in other words, creating a clone.
** Although, technically, most theories today about how Star Trek-style teleportation would work are along these same lines. A person's information is beamed to the destination point, a duplicate (clone) is constructed and then the original is vaporized.

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* In ''VideoGame/SystemShock'', the main character can perform a DNA upload in a cloning booth. quantum entanglement booth (called a "Quantum Bio-Reconstruction Machine" in ''System Shock 2''). Then, if they die, they are cloned at the booth with the stats they had while they were there last, like a checkpoint.
** Isn't it a 'quantum entanglement booth' - it's explained as being something closer to teleporting, though that isn't what 'quantum entanglement' really means.
** In ''System Shock 2'' it's called a "Quantum Bio-Reconstruction Machine." So more of a clone box, not a teleporter.
** The Voice in the Cupboard does explain it in terms that make you think teleporter though. Reconstruction isn't specific to cloning.
** Shodan/Polito says that it will "rebuild your body ''from scratch''." Which to me sounds like starting over from your DNA sample alone, or in other words, creating a clone.
** Although, technically, most theories today about how Star Trek-style teleportation would work are along these same lines. A person's information is beamed to the destination point, a duplicate (clone) is constructed and then the original is vaporized.
checkpoint.



* An interesting variant occurs in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' with [[{{Teleportation}} Oni Lee]]. Whenever Lee teleports, his new body is formed at the target destination and his old body continues on for several seconds before dissolving into carbon ash. But those seconds can be a long time in combat...


-->-- ''To Be''

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-->-- ''To Be''
''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfHbsMa_wao To Be]]''


-->-- ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdxucpPq6Lc To Be]]''

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-->-- ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdxucpPq6Lc To Be]]''
''To Be''

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