Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture

Go To


Added DiffLines:

** "{{Literature/Runaround}}": Published in 1942, this story takes place in 2015, with ubiquitous robots and interplanetary space travel.

Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/AllTheTroublesOfTheWorld'': Earth looks very different from present-day, with the [[MasterComputer superintelligent Multivac]] guiding humanity on both a personal level and on a society-level scale. Instead of internet cafes, there are booths for connecting to Multivac and getting answers to any question you would like, from the trivial to the personal.


[[folder:Anime & Manga]]

to:

[[folder:Anime & and Manga]]


* ''Film/RoboCop'' is frequently set in the "near future", [[http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/25/business/robocop-neumeier-detroit-bankruptcy/index.html?iid=article_sidebar which managed to accurately predict the state of]] UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} several years later, as well as crappy gas mileage for cars, CDs being the norm, and sensationalistic news.

to:

* ''Film/RoboCop'' is frequently set in the "near future", [[http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/25/business/robocop-neumeier-detroit-bankruptcy/index.html?iid=article_sidebar which managed to accurately predict the state of]] UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} several years later, as well as crappy gas mileage for cars, CDs [=CDs=] being the norm, and sensationalistic news.


* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' averts this by using contemporary technology (such as interactive whiteboards and digital picture frames), although fans who aren't familiar with the technology have mistaken it for this trope (WordOfGod is that it takes place in 2011, the same year it was released). The only exception may or may not be Sayaka's {{MP3}} player which can also snap open and play conventional UsefulNotes/{{Compact Disc}}s.

to:

* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' averts this by using contemporary technology (such as interactive whiteboards and digital picture frames), although fans who aren't familiar with the technology have mistaken it for this trope (WordOfGod is that it takes place in 2011, the same year it was released). The only exception may or may not be Sayaka's {{MP3}} UsefulNotes/{{MP3}} player which can also snap open and play conventional UsefulNotes/{{Compact Disc}}s.


* ''Anime/{{Patlabor}}'', made in 1988 and set in 1998. "This story is a work of fiction -- but in ten years, who knows?"

to:

* ''Anime/{{Patlabor}}'', made in 1988 and set in 1998. Not much has changed besides mechas being commonly used for mundane tasks. "This story is a work of fiction -- but in ten years, who knows?"


Added DiffLines:

* The short ''[[Anime/{{Memories}} Magnetic Rose]]'' takes place in 2092. It's a plot point that Eva was alive decades ago during the early-to-mid 2000s (with the characters noting they've never met anyone alive during the 2000s). It takes place in space, however not much seems to have changed on Earth. Fashion is similar to the 1990s and much of the technology seems similar, however holograms exist, technology has advanced a fair sum, and space travel has improved.





[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

to:

[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



* ''Manga/{{Akira}}'' begins with a nuclear explosion in 1988 that sets off World War III. (In fact, the date of the explosion given in the movie -- 1988.07.16 -- was the date the movie premièred.)

to:

* ''Manga/{{Akira}}'' begins with a nuclear explosion ''Manhua/SchoolShock'' is set in 1988 that sets off World War III. (In fact, the date 2017. The science fiction focuses on nanomachines, single person aviation, cyborgs and a little bit of the explosion given in the movie -- 1988.07.16 -- was the date the movie premièred.)BrainInAJar tech.



[[folder:Film]]

to:

[[folder:Film]][[folder:Films -- Animation]]
* ''Manga/{{Akira}}'' begins with a nuclear explosion in 1988 that sets off World War III. (In fact, the date of the explosion given in the movie -- 1988.07.16 -- was the date the movie premièred.)
* ''Disney/BigHero6'' provides the page image, and according to a sign detailing the 95th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge takes place sometime around 2032. San Fransokyo is shown being rife with massive turbine kites, highly advanced robotics (of which even Baymax stands out in comparison) to the point where illegal botfighting tournaments are commonplace and even [[spoiler:partially functioning wormhole technology]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* ''Film/{{Predator 2}}'' predicts the grim voodoo gangs of 1997 Los Angeles.
** For the most part, the movie's future setting ages well, with the exception of the voodoo gangs and the heavily modified guns the police carry. No flying cars or bizarre mainstream fashions, though fedoras seem to have come back.

to:

* ''Film/{{Predator 2}}'' ''Film/Predator2'' predicts the grim voodoo gangs of 1997 Los Angeles.
**
Angeles.For the most part, the movie's future setting ages well, with the exception of the voodoo gangs and the heavily modified guns the police carry. No flying cars or bizarre mainstream fashions, though fedoras seem to have come back.



* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', the only futuristic technology seems to be the technology to enter another person's dreamscape, but that is only used by a small number of people, and used ''constructively'' by a ''very'' small number of people. We get a brief glimpse of an "opium cave" where people go to have shared dreams in Mombasa - this pretty strongly implies that it's illegal, and if it is, it probably has a fair deal of recreational use in the Western world, as well.

to:

* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', the only futuristic technology seems to be the technology to enter another person's dreamscape, but that is only used by a small number of people, and used ''constructively'' by a ''very'' small number of people. We get a brief glimpse of an "opium cave" where people go to have shared dreams in Mombasa - -- this pretty strongly implies that it's illegal, and if it is, it probably has a fair deal of recreational use in the Western world, as well.



* ''Disney/BigHero6'' provides the page image, and according to a sign detailing the 95th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge takes place sometime around 2032. San Fransokyo is shown being rife with massive turbine kites, highly advanced robotics (of which even Baymax stands out in comparison) to the point where illegal botfighting tournaments are commonplace and even [[spoiler:partially functioning wormhole technology]].



* ''Film/SoylentGreen'' is set in 2022. However, the causes of that particular dystopia--overpopulation, pollution and intense climate change--are issues that are still relevant today.

to:

* ''Film/SoylentGreen'' is set in 2022. However, the causes of that particular dystopia--overpopulation, dystopia -- overpopulation, pollution and intense climate change--are change -- are issues that are still relevant today.



** ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen: Black Dossier'' put the book's events ''in'' 1948, allowing them to [[spoiler:show a fallen Oceania government ten years later]].

to:

** ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen: ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen: Black Dossier'' put the book's events ''in'' 1948, allowing them to [[spoiler:show a fallen Oceania government ten years later]].



** ''{{Literature/Franchise}}'': The introduction of Multivac is really the only bit of technology added to 1950s culture/technology. The story is about Multivac being used to "streamline" elections by asking one citizen their opinions on current economics and extrapolating how the population would vote from that.

to:

** ''{{Literature/Franchise}}'': ''Literature/{{Franchise}}'': The introduction of Multivac is really the only bit of technology added to 1950s culture/technology. The story is about Multivac being used to "streamline" elections by asking one citizen their opinions on current economics and extrapolating how the population would vote from that.



** Note that many of the stories explicitly set in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into the Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion "The Invasion"]] and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead "Mawdryn Undead"]], but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in [[REcap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield "Battlefield"]], the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a notorious ContinuitySnarl, leading to much debate among fans (although this is generational to a degree, it's very rare to meet a fan nowadays who argues that the 1970s UNIT stories were set later than broadcast date who isn't old enough to have watched them when they were first broadcast), has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The Sontaran Stratagem"]] by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").

to:

** Note that many of the stories explicitly set in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into into the Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion "The Invasion"]] "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion The Invasion]]" and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead "Mawdryn Undead"]], "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead Mawdryn Undead]]", but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in [[REcap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield "Battlefield"]], "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield Battlefield]]", the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a notorious ContinuitySnarl, leading to much debate among fans (although this is generational to a degree, it's very rare to meet a fan nowadays who argues that the 1970s UNIT stories were set later than broadcast date who isn't old enough to have watched them when they were first broadcast), has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem The Sontaran Stratagem"]] Stratagem]]" by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").



** The Second Doctor's companion Zoe comes from the 21st century, but few dates are given for her era... until in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber "The Mind Robber"]] (aired in 1968), she is familiar with a cartoon character from the year 2000, implying that she's from a few years past that time at most. Or that she's a comics geek, which wouldn't be out of character for her.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet "The Tenth Planet"]] (1966) was set in the futuristic age of 1986, and features the discovery of Earth's twin planet of Mondas, which begins to siphon off Earth's energy. Come 1985, and the show's still running the story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E1AttackOfTheCybermen "Attack of the Cybermen"]] sees the Sixth Doctor heading off the titular attack before it affects the Mondas attack...
** All episodes set in the present day from 2005's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon "Aliens of London"]] to 2008's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]], inclusive, take place a year after the airing date. [[note]]2007's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] is a tiny exception to the rule, because the Doctor's only present-day appearance in that episode was after a one-year TimeSkip from a linear, subjective viewpoint. This means that "Blink" ''started'' in the year it aired but ''finished'' at the normal one-year-ahead point.[[/note]] This was due to "Aliens of London" being explicitly set a year after the first episode of the 2005 season. Thanks to the series taking a "gap year" in which only a handful of specials were aired, the series was able to align with present-day by the time the Tenth Doctor handed off to the Eleventh Doctor.

to:

** The Second Doctor's companion Zoe comes from the 21st century, but few dates are given for her era... until in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber The Mind Robber"]] Robber]]" (aired in 1968), she is familiar with a cartoon character from the year 2000, implying that she's from a few years past that time at most. Or that she's a comics geek, which wouldn't be out of character for her.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet The Tenth Planet"]] Planet]]" (1966) was set in the futuristic age of 1986, and features the discovery of Earth's twin planet of Mondas, which begins to siphon off Earth's energy. Come 1985, and the show's still running -- the story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E1AttackOfTheCybermen "Attack "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E1AttackOfTheCybermen Attack of the Cybermen"]] Cybermen]]" sees the Sixth Doctor heading off the titular attack before it affects the Mondas attack...
** All episodes set in the present day from 2005's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon "Aliens "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon Aliens of London"]] London]]" to 2008's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]], "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd Journey's End]]", inclusive, take place a year after the airing date. [[note]]2007's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink Blink]]" is a tiny exception to the rule, because the Doctor's only present-day appearance in that episode was after a one-year TimeSkip from a linear, subjective viewpoint. This means that "Blink" ''started'' in the year it aired but ''finished'' at the normal one-year-ahead point.[[/note]] This was due to "Aliens of London" being explicitly set a year after the first episode of the 2005 season. Thanks to the series taking a "gap year" in which only a handful of specials were aired, the series was able to align with present-day by the time the Tenth Doctor handed off to the Eleventh Doctor.



[[folder:Manhua]]
* ''Manhua/SchoolShock'' is set in 2017. The science fiction focuses on nanomachines, single person aviation, cyborgs and a little bit of BrainInAJar tech.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Roleplay]]
* The ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse'', while officially set in whatever the current year happened to be, was actually this. The technology, social mores, and general feel of the setting were never really matched with RealLife.
[[/folder]]



* ''VisualNovel/NewDanganRonpaV3'' seems to be this way. There's a RidiculouslyHumanRobot and the Class Trial room, instead of a circle, is now composed of hovering glowing platforms that move around, not to mention the Gifted Inmates Academy seem to have been abandoned for a long time.



* In ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'', the [[AfterTheEnd Catastrophe]] (an event which results in [[DepopulationBomb the deaths of 80% of the Eurasian population]]) occurs on June 6, 1991 in the Japanese versions (the first versions of the game were released for Japanese computers in 1988). Changed to 1996 (convenient due to the presence of a [[FauxSymbolism third 6 in its date]]) in the English Sega CD version released in 1994.
* ''VisualNovel/{{Policenauts}},'' the SpiritualSuccessor to ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'' originally released in 1994, states that mankind's first fully functional space colony would be launched in 2010.



* ''VisualNovel/{{Remember 11}}'' takes place in January 2011 and mentions the existence of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) VI, used in the field of psychology to classify and describe the symptoms of disorders; as of fall 2010, they're still saying the DSM-V won't be published until 2013.
** Similarly, ''VisualNovel/{{Ever17}}'' is set in 2017 [[spoiler:and 2034]].
* Both ''VideoGame/TheConduit'' and ''VideoGame/{{Conduit 2}}'' take place in the near future; the backstory of ''The Conduit'' even includes a second terrorist attack in the United States on [[TheWarOnTerror September 11]].

to:

* ''VisualNovel/{{Remember 11}}'' takes place in January 2011 and mentions the existence of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) VI, used in the field of psychology to classify and describe the symptoms of disorders; as of fall 2010, they're still saying the DSM-V won't be published until 2013.
** Similarly, ''VisualNovel/{{Ever17}}'' is set in 2017 [[spoiler:and 2034]].
* Both ''VideoGame/TheConduit'' and ''VideoGame/{{Conduit 2}}'' ''VideoGame/Conduit2'' take place in the near future; the backstory of ''The Conduit'' even includes a second terrorist attack in the United States on [[TheWarOnTerror September 11]].



* The ''VisualNovel/ZeroEscape'' series is set in 2027, through to 2074. A lot of the technology is considered a standard affair by the characters (such as a freezing fire extinguisher and holograms), while others surprise even them, like the extraordinarily life robots and the ADAM machine. [[spoiler:In the case of the ''VirtuesLastReward'' cast, this is due to most of them not realizing it's currently 2074.]]



* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' with the main series. The first game which was released first in 2001 in Japan and 2005 everywhere else takes place in 2016. With the [[VisuaNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney fourth game]] there was a seven year leap from 2019 to 2026, and now the latest game, [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice Spirit of Justice]] takes place in 2028. Generally the technology in the early games fitted that of the time of the game's release, however the last few games have begun implementing bits and pieces of casual futuristic technology. This includes holograms, robots with pretty advanced A.I, and computer programs that can replicate investigations. Certain out of game material also seems to suggest that household robots are commercially available.



[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''VisualNovel/NewDanganRonpaV3'' seems to be this way. There's a RidiculouslyHumanRobot and the Class Trial room, instead of a circle, is now composed of hovering glowing platforms that move around, not to mention the Gifted Inmates Academy seem to have been abandoned for a long time.
* In ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'', the [[AfterTheEnd Catastrophe]] (an event which results in [[DepopulationBomb the deaths of 80% of the Eurasian population]]) occurs on June 6, 1991 in the Japanese versions (the first versions of the game were released for Japanese computers in 1988). Changed to 1996 (convenient due to the presence of a [[FauxSymbolism third 6 in its date]]) in the English Sega CD version released in 1994.
* ''VisualNovel/{{Policenauts}},'' the SpiritualSuccessor to ''VisualNovel/{{Snatcher}}'' originally released in 1994, states that mankind's first fully functional space colony would be launched in 2010.
* ''VisualNovel/Remember11'' takes place in January 2011 and mentions the existence of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) VI, used in the field of psychology to classify and describe the symptoms of disorders; as of fall 2010, they're still saying the DSM-V won't be published until 2013.
* Similarly, ''VisualNovel/Ever17'' is set in 2017 [[spoiler:and 2034]].
* The ''VisualNovel/ZeroEscape'' series is set in 2027, through to 2074. A lot of the technology is considered a standard affair by the characters (such as a freezing fire extinguisher and holograms), while others surprise even them, like the extraordinarily life robots and the ADAM machine. [[spoiler:In the case of the ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'' cast, this is due to most of them not realizing it's currently 2074.]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' with the main series. The first game which was released first in 2001 in Japan and 2005 everywhere else takes place in 2016. With the [[VisuaNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney fourth game]] there was a seven year leap from 2019 to 2026, and now the latest game, [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice Spirit of Justice]] takes place in 2028. Generally the technology in the early games fitted that of the time of the game's release, however the last few games have begun implementing bits and pieces of casual futuristic technology. This includes holograms, robots with pretty advanced A.I, and computer programs that can replicate investigations. Certain out of game material also seems to suggest that household robots are commercially available.
[[/folder]]



* The ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse'', while officially set in whatever the current year happened to be, was actually this. The technology, social mores, and general feel of the setting were never really matched with RealLife.
* ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfTaras The Chronicles of Taras: Red Dementia]]'' is dated as being in the year 2009. But you wouldn't know it from the Volcanic Deserts, PostApocalyptic Ruined Buildings and hyper-advanced BioPunk and DieselPunk technologies drifting around..........

to:

* The ''Roleplay/GlobalGuardiansPBEMUniverse'', while officially set in whatever the current year happened to be, was actually this. The technology, social mores, and general feel of the setting were never really matched with RealLife.
* ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfTaras The Chronicles of Taras: Red Dementia]]'' is dated as being in the year 2009. But you wouldn't know it from the Volcanic Deserts, PostApocalyptic Ruined Buildings and hyper-advanced BioPunk and DieselPunk technologies drifting around..........around....



* ''WebOriginal/LegendyPolskie'' are just that - fairy tales retold Twenty Minutes into the Future.



[[folder:Web Videos]]
* ''WebVideo/LegendyPolskie'' are just that -- fairy tales retold Twenty Minutes into the Future.
[[/folder]]



* The setting of ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}''. The show it parodies, ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2020}}'', arguably suffered worse from the trope because it took itself seriously.

to:

* The setting of ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}''.''WesternAnimation/Sealab2021''. The show it parodies, ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2020}}'', arguably suffered worse from the trope because it took itself seriously.


* Creator/IsaacAsimov's "Literature/TheDeadPast": The largest change between current day and the "future" of this story is that scientific research has calcified into highly specialized fields, and only the [[OneWorldOrder world government]] approves research grants.

to:

* Creator/IsaacAsimov's Creator/IsaacAsimov:
**
"Literature/TheDeadPast": The largest change between current day and the "future" of this story is that scientific research has calcified into highly specialized fields, and only the [[OneWorldOrder world government]] approves research grants. grants.
** ''{{Literature/Franchise}}'': The introduction of Multivac is really the only bit of technology added to 1950s culture/technology. The story is about Multivac being used to "streamline" elections by asking one citizen their opinions on current economics and extrapolating how the population would vote from that.

Added DiffLines:

* The Irish short film ''Film/HighAndTight'' is set a couple of years in the future where a hypothetical war has broken out in Eastern Europe, and Ireland has entered the war.


* Joe Haldeman admits that setting his novel ''Literature/TheForeverWar'', about a deep space war to start in the far-off future of 1996, was silly in retrospect, and was done mainly so that the non-coms could be Vietnam veterans. He told any objectors to just "think of it as a parallel universe."

to:

* Joe Haldeman Creator/JoeHaldeman admits that setting his novel ''Literature/TheForeverWar'', about a deep space war to start in the far-off future of 1996, was silly in retrospect, and was done mainly so that the non-coms could be Vietnam veterans. He told any objectors to just "think of it as a parallel universe."



* Creator/SpiderRobinson has a habit of setting stories five to ten years in the future and including elements such as zero-gravity vehicles, over-population to the extent that murder is no longer a crime even in ''Canada'', futuristic swear words ("You taken slot!") that have completely replaced our current Saxon words, dilating doors, and a character glancing at his "watch finger". Robinson has in fact had to redate some of his own stories in reprint: the original (1982) edition of ''Mindkiller'' was set in 1995 and 1999, the reprint in 2005 and 2009.

to:

* Creator/SpiderRobinson has a habit of setting stories five to ten years in the future and including elements such as zero-gravity vehicles, over-population to the extent that murder is no longer a crime even in ''Canada'', futuristic swear words ("You taken slot!") that have completely replaced our current Saxon words, dilating doors, and a character glancing at his "watch finger". Robinson has in fact had to redate [[OrwellianRetcon redate]] some of his own stories in reprint: the original (1982) edition of ''Mindkiller'' was set in 1995 and 1999, the reprint in 2005 and 2009.



** In ''Cocktail Time'' (if I'm remembering the correct title), a gentleman disgruntled by an encounter with Drones writes a novel also called ''Cocktail Time'', exposing the depravity of today's youth. The cover of this 'inner' novel is described as featuring a young man in spats dancing the rock-and-roll.
* Shepherd Mead's ''The Big Ball Of Wax'' (published in 1954) predicted that in 1999, {{Video Phone}}s would be common (though he failed to predict personal computers or the internet, the things which made this very nearly right), TV sets would be wall-size and stereoscopic (we're still waiting...), videotapes would be widespread (he got that right too, though he thought they would be open-reel and didn't foresee [=DVDs=]), power transmission would be a reality and cars would thus be electric, contraceptive pills would be easily available (yes) and nearly all diseases eradicated (sadly, no), the Soviet Union would have fallen and Leningrad reverted to its old name of St. Petersburg (both yes)... and that XP would take over (he got that [[http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-xp/ right -- sort of, anyway]], though ''his'' XP was E'''XP'''eriential Broadcasting, a way of recording and transmitting full-sensory material). Let's hope that the last one never comes true, or at least not the way Mead depicted it...

to:

** In ''Cocktail Time'' (if I'm remembering the correct title), ''Literature/CocktailTime'', a gentleman disgruntled by an encounter with Drones writes a novel also called ''Cocktail Time'', exposing the depravity of today's youth. The cover of this 'inner' novel is described as featuring a young man in spats dancing the rock-and-roll.
* Shepherd Mead's ''The Big Ball Of Wax'' Creator/ShepherdMead's ''Literature/TheBigBallOfWax'' (published in 1954) predicted that in 1999, {{Video Phone}}s would be common (though he failed to predict personal computers or the internet, the things which made this very nearly right), TV sets would be wall-size and stereoscopic (we're still waiting...), videotapes would be widespread (he got that right too, though he thought they would be open-reel and didn't foresee [=DVDs=]), power transmission would be a reality and cars would thus be electric, contraceptive pills would be easily available (yes) and nearly all diseases eradicated (sadly, no), the Soviet Union would have fallen and Leningrad reverted to its old name of St. Petersburg (both yes)... and that XP would take over (he got that [[http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-xp/ right -- sort of, anyway]], though ''his'' XP was E'''XP'''eriential Broadcasting, a way of recording and transmitting full-sensory material). Let's hope that the last one never comes true, or at least not the way Mead depicted it...



* John Birmingham's ''Literature/AxisOfTime'' trilogy is an interesting case as it's very difficult to tell if it is meant seriously or is a very deadpan parody of {{techno thriller}}s. The first volume was published in 2004 and it's (initially) set in a 2021 where everything that can go wrong with the "war on terror" has gone wrong, turning it into a full scale war of the west against Islam, with the allies acting with as much brutality as the enemy (a sanctioned form of field punishment for the US forces is to put a Muslim enemy into a pig carcass and bury him or her alive). Probably the most ridiculous element is the predictions about technology, which include fusion reactors, artificial intelligence, military medical implants (which, amongst other things, reduce the soldiers' sex drive and dispense painkillers) and the routine use of vat-grown replacement organs. This is all at least 20 years early.

to:

* John Birmingham's Creator/JohnBirmingham's ''Literature/AxisOfTime'' trilogy is an interesting case as it's very difficult to tell if it is meant seriously or is a very deadpan parody of {{techno thriller}}s. The first volume was published in 2004 and it's (initially) set in a 2021 where everything that can go wrong with the "war on terror" has gone wrong, turning it into a full scale war of the west against Islam, with the allies acting with as much brutality as the enemy (a sanctioned form of field punishment for the US forces is to put a Muslim enemy into a pig carcass and bury him or her alive). Probably the most ridiculous element is the predictions about technology, which include fusion reactors, artificial intelligence, military medical implants (which, amongst other things, reduce the soldiers' sex drive and dispense painkillers) and the routine use of vat-grown replacement organs. This is all at least 20 years early.



* ''The War In The Air'' by Creator/HGWells is a mixed bag. The details of the technology are largely wide of the mark, but he nails the strategic importance of air superiority ''and'' the political factors that would lead to a World War with uncanny accuracy (though the Chinese-Japanese alliance is something of a FunnyAneurysmMoment), and the final chapters are set in an AfterTheEnd scenario that would not look at all out of place in a post-nuclear scenario. Wells himself acknowledged this in his preface to the 1917 edition, with some bitterness over the CassandraTruth nature of his work. His amendment to said preface for the ''1939'' edition read, simply: "I warned you. You ''damned'' fools."

to:

* ''The War In The Air'' ''Literature/TheWarInTheAir'' by Creator/HGWells is a mixed bag. The details of the technology are largely wide of the mark, but he nails the strategic importance of air superiority ''and'' the political factors that would lead to a World War with uncanny accuracy (though the Chinese-Japanese alliance is something of a FunnyAneurysmMoment), and the final chapters are set in an AfterTheEnd scenario that would not look at all out of place in a post-nuclear scenario. Wells himself acknowledged this in his preface to the 1917 edition, with some bitterness over the CassandraTruth nature of his work. His amendment to said preface for the ''1939'' edition read, simply: "I warned you. You ''damned'' fools."



* James P Hogan's ''Literature/GiantsSeries'' is based in 2030s (it has a character born in 1984 who is 40-something at the time of the events of the novel). The series has mankind going from weaponized to no weapons somewhere around 2020 and having manned missions as far out as Jupiter. [[spoiler:The remains of aliens (or our ancestors anyway)]] are discovered on the Moon, [[spoiler:real aliens]] are found on one of the moons of Jupiter, and [[spoiler:more aliens show up and later suffer from FishOutOfTemporalWater with their own race due to their mode of transportation]].

to:

* James P Hogan's Creator/JamesPHogan's ''Literature/GiantsSeries'' is based in 2030s (it has a character born in 1984 who is 40-something at the time of the events of the novel). The series has mankind going from weaponized to no weapons somewhere around 2020 and having manned missions as far out as Jupiter. [[spoiler:The remains of aliens (or our ancestors anyway)]] are discovered on the Moon, [[spoiler:real aliens]] are found on one of the moons of Jupiter, and [[spoiler:more aliens show up and later suffer from FishOutOfTemporalWater with their own race due to their mode of transportation]].



* Carl Sagan's ''Literature/{{Contact}}'' was written in 1983 and set in the late 1990s. Sagan did not foresee the fall of the Soviet Union at the time of writing and the Soviets had a large role to play in the novel's events. He also did not foresee the cell phone, as characters used pagers still. He did ambitiously have a character who solved the grand superunification theory (something that eludes us even today and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future)... And other human technologies that turned out to be beyond what had occurred by the late '90s, such as orbital space stations serving as retirement homes for those who wished to extend their lifespans and could afford it, and shuttle services to go between earth and station.
* Justin Cronin's ''Literature/ThePassage'' starts in a 2018 where a terrorist massacre in the Mall of America has resulted in an America where state borders have checkpoints, a second Class 5 hurricane has resulted in New Orleans becoming directly controlled by the Federal government and Jenna Bush is Governor of Texas. Also India and Pakistan nuked each other.

to:

* Carl Sagan's Creator/CarlSagan's ''Literature/{{Contact}}'' was written in 1983 and set in the late 1990s. Sagan did not foresee the fall of the Soviet Union at the time of writing and the Soviets had a large role to play in the novel's events. He also did not foresee the cell phone, as characters used pagers still. He did ambitiously have a character who solved the grand superunification theory (something that eludes us even today and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future)... And other human technologies that turned out to be beyond what had occurred by the late '90s, such as orbital space stations serving as retirement homes for those who wished to extend their lifespans and could afford it, and shuttle services to go between earth and station.
* Justin Cronin's Creator/JustinCronin's ''Literature/ThePassage'' starts in a 2018 where a terrorist massacre in the Mall of America has resulted in an America where state borders have checkpoints, a second Class 5 hurricane has resulted in New Orleans becoming directly controlled by the Federal government and Jenna Bush is Governor of Texas. Also India and Pakistan nuked each other.



* John Stith's ''Literature/ManhattanTransfer'' is far enough into the future from the publication date of 1993 that they have tiny memory disks and something mentioned in passing called a "[=VirtReal=] Simulation", but the [[HarsherInHindsight World Trade Center is still standing]] and there's no mention of TheInternet.

to:

* John Stith's Creator/JohnStith's ''Literature/ManhattanTransfer'' is far enough into the future from the publication date of 1993 that they have tiny memory disks and something mentioned in passing called a "[=VirtReal=] Simulation", but the [[HarsherInHindsight World Trade Center is still standing]] and there's no mention of TheInternet.



* Keith Nartman's ''Drew Parke'' books, both written in 2009, are set in the mid 2030s.

to:

* Keith Nartman's ''Drew Parke'' Creator/KeithNartman's ''Literature/DrewParke'' books, both written in 2009, are set in the mid 2030s.



* "The Devil's Footprints" from ''[[Literature/PointHorror 13 More Tales of Horror]]'' takes place in 2004 (the short story collection was published in 1994). Apparently, by that point, everyone should have had house-controlling supercomputers.

to:

* "The "[[Literature/TheDevilsFootprints The Devil's Footprints" Footprints]]" from ''[[Literature/PointHorror 13 More Tales of Horror]]'' takes place in 2004 (the short story collection was published in 1994). Apparently, by that point, everyone should have had house-controlling supercomputers.



* ''Creator/JamesBlish'''s "Year 2018" (later incorporated in his ''Literature/CitiesInFlight'') : The Soviet Union still exists; [[UsefulNotes/JosephMcCarthy McCarthyism]] has become permanent and has turned the US into an Orwellian police state. There is a political dynasty that always wins. The US has colonies on Jupiter's moons but one of the characters complains how SLOWLY space exploration is progressing. The only remaining religious group is Evangelicals (not accurate in 2016 but it does fit the way the media tends to cover religion). The fact that a powerful senator is from Alaska is considered a novelty.

to:

* ''Creator/JamesBlish'''s Creator/JamesBlish's "Year 2018" (later incorporated in his ''Literature/CitiesInFlight'') : The Soviet Union still exists; [[UsefulNotes/JosephMcCarthy McCarthyism]] has become permanent and has turned the US into an Orwellian police state. There is a political dynasty that always wins. The US has colonies on Jupiter's moons but one of the characters complains how SLOWLY space exploration is progressing. The only remaining religious group is Evangelicals (not accurate in 2016 but it does fit the way the media tends to cover religion). The fact that a powerful senator is from Alaska is considered a novelty.



* The largest change between current day and the "future" of this story is that scientific research has calcified into highly specialized fields, and only the [[OneWorldOrder world government]] approves research grants.

to:

* Creator/IsaacAsimov's "Literature/TheDeadPast": The largest change between current day and the "future" of this story is that scientific research has calcified into highly specialized fields, and only the [[OneWorldOrder world government]] approves research grants.


* Robert Harris's novel ''Conclave'' takes place at an undisclosed time in the iminant future. The book was published in 2016, and contains to references to 2017 and 2018 as though both years are in the very recent past. Technology and society are completely indistinguishable from that of the year the book was written, and there are many references to years as far back as the 1930s as being in living memory.

to:

* Robert Harris's Creator/RobertHarris's novel ''Conclave'' ''{{Literature/Conclave}}'' takes place at an undisclosed time in the iminant future. The book was published in 2016, and contains to references to 2017 and 2018 as though both years are in the very recent past. Technology and society are completely indistinguishable from that of the year the book was written, and there are many references to years as far back as the 1930s as being in living memory.memory.
* The largest change between current day and the "future" of this story is that scientific research has calcified into highly specialized fields, and only the [[OneWorldOrder world government]] approves research grants.


** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2:'' Parts of the game are set in the year 2025. The major differences from the present day seen in-game include mass proliferation of [[AttackDrone combat drone technology]], weapons that are [[RareGuns prototypes]] today shown in common use, [[ChinaTakesOverTheWorld China having formed a multinational Strategic Defence Coalition that threatens world peace,]] commercially available VTOL aircraft, and a super-expensive resort city on a mobile, floating island. On the other hand, nightclubs on said island still play Music/{{Skrillex}}.

to:

** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2:'' ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsII'': Parts of the game are set in the year 2025. The major differences from the present day seen in-game include mass proliferation of [[AttackDrone combat drone technology]], weapons that are [[RareGuns prototypes]] today shown in common use, [[ChinaTakesOverTheWorld China having formed a multinational Strategic Defence Coalition that threatens world peace,]] commercially available VTOL aircraft, and a super-expensive resort city on a mobile, floating island. On the other hand, nightclubs on said island still play Music/{{Skrillex}}.



** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3'' jumps forward to roughly the time of ''Advanced Warfare'' (2065) and we find soldiers with robotic augmentations and LeParkour enabling "Cyber Rigs", among other things. In this reality, autonomous defense systems have become so sophisticated that they cause a stalemate so national defense has returned to reliance on traditional foot soldier forces, hence the growth in robotic augmentation.

to:

** ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3'' ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOpsIII'' jumps forward to roughly the time of ''Advanced Warfare'' (2065) and we find soldiers with robotic augmentations and LeParkour enabling "Cyber Rigs", among other things. In this reality, autonomous defense systems have become so sophisticated that they cause a stalemate so national defense has returned to reliance on traditional foot soldier forces, hence the growth in robotic augmentation.

Added DiffLines:

* Technology in the world of ''Anime/MyHeroAcademia'' is a bit more advanced than our own; hologram projectors are small and cheap enough to be handed out with magazines à la CD-ROM demos. In an omake, Mount Lady mentions 8K television.[[note]]The most powerful [=TVs=] today only have a 4K resolution.[[/note]]


** Note that many of the stories explicitly set in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into the Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion "The Invasion"]] and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead "Mawdryn Undead"]], but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in [[REcap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield "Battlefield"]], the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a major topic of debate among fans, has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The Sontaran Stratagem"]] by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").

to:

** Note that many of the stories explicitly set in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into the Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion "The Invasion"]] and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead "Mawdryn Undead"]], but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in [[REcap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield "Battlefield"]], the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a major topic of notorious ContinuitySnarl, leading to much debate among fans, fans (although this is generational to a degree, it's very rare to meet a fan nowadays who argues that the 1970s UNIT stories were set later than broadcast date who isn't old enough to have watched them when they were first broadcast), has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The Sontaran Stratagem"]] by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").


* The MTV sketch comedy show ''Series/TheState'' lampooned this idea with a sketch where a man wakes up in a hospital after only a short time knocked out in an accident only to find that he missed the "most exciting 15 minutes in the history of the world", and now aliens have landed and all sorts of things have changed.

to:

* The MTV sketch comedy show ''Series/TheState'' lampooned this idea first season of ''Series/TwentyFour'', aired in 2001, was set in March 2004 (as retroactively indicated by a shot of a character's driver license shown in season 4), and each following season has been set a few years after the previous one. (The most recent season, the show's sixth, aired in 2007 and was set in 2013; the seventh season, which began in January 2009 is set in November 2017.) Could be [[NextSundayAD Twenty Seconds into the Future]] if not for the AppliedPhlebotinum (real-time satellite surveillance, handheld remote heartbeat sensors, &c.) that pops up from time to time.
* The TV series (and [[Film/AlienNation the film]]) ''Series/AlienNation'' was set in the near-future of the late eighties/early nineties. The TV movies took place in the late 1990s and early 2000s: Emily was 13 in "Dark Horizon" and presumably between 16 and 18 in "The Udara Legacy", as she was still attending high school. The transition from TV series to TV movies involved some unfortunate timeline-tweaking with rather inconsistent aging.
** For the record, you could smoke in the police station, there were a few gags about non-existent sequels to famous movies (''Franchise/BackToTheFuture [[RidiculousFutureSequelization VI]]'', etc.), and by the TV movies they had video-phones... but the cars still looked distinctively Eighties.
*** At the time, they were using the most aerodynamic and "futuristic" looking cars they could get.
** Also, the computer user interfaces are also distinctively Eighties or "Graphic-DOS" styled, with no notion of CUA-like interfaces anywhere... but Internet has been replaced by something called "Optinet". One of the movies has a computer
with a sketch where a man wakes up in a hospital after only a short time knocked out in an accident only to find then-futuristic touch screen (running what looks basically like Windows 95).
* An interestingly related setting is
that he missed of ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''. The viewer is initially given no reference frame for when it occurs relative to Earth history, but it fits the "most exciting 15 minutes in pattern of Twenty Minutes into the history Future in that it combines highly advanced, futuristic technology with a culture that is almost indistinguishable from the USA of 2005, down to the clothing. As the series progresses, more specific elements of American culture start appearing, and the fleet discovers [[spoiler: the post-apocalyptic remains of a planet they believe to be Earth, whose inhabitants also had a culture resembling 2000s America.]] Eventually, the series is revealed to be occurring somewhere around the year ''[[spoiler: 148,000 B.C.]]''. [[ArcWords All this has happened before and will happen again.]]
** The prequel series ''Caprica'', set about 50-60 years prior to the main series, follows the pattern to a degree by dressing the characters in fashions reminiscent
of the world", '40s and now aliens have landed '50s.
** In addition to similarities in clothing, the series features other modern-day elements, such as British rifles
and all sorts of things have changed.American HMMW-Vs.



* ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' is the trope namer. The original TV movie was entitled ''Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future'' and the phrase was reused in the opening sequence of the resultant TV series (which takes place in a different universe and begins with a shortened remake of the movie). The date the series takes place is never explicitly pinned down, but the teenage character Bryce Lynch's birthdate was given in the movie and series pilot as October 7, 1988.
** You can still smoke in public buildings. It's a federal offense to turn your TV off. This being cyberpunk, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-zyRlcMi4&fmt=13#t=320 there is an Internet,]] though it gets called "The System", and the way it's shown to work is [[ItsASmallNetAfterAll pretty thoroughly gonzo]]. There are no reality shows. [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan rules the business world]]. Network news is filmed on camcorders. There is still a Soviet Union, which has colonized part of the Third World.
** Also transplantation "body banks" which will pay for fresh corpses, no questions asked.
* The setting (and almost-subtitle; they went with "Almost Tomorrow") of the second season of ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds''. Martial law. Bad air. Food shortages. Genetic engineering. "Totally real" VR simulations. [[TechMarchesOn Eight-bit computers]].
* ''Series/DarkAngel'' made in 2000, takes place in 2019, with a backstory where in 2009 terrorists set off an {{EMP}}, turning the United States into a third world hellhole. Which keeps it from looking too dated; ''Dark Angel'' 2019 looks like regular 2019 except shittier. The only significant technological differences are the {{Transhuman}} people running around, and they were a secret project anyway, and the PoliceState flying drones that look very similar to real world drones.

to:

* ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' is In the trope namer. The original TV 1979 movie was entitled ''Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future'' and the phrase was reused in the opening sequence of the resultant subsequent TV series (which takes ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'', the titular character, Buck begins his journey in 1987 in a deep space probe that was supposed to last a few months. Something goes wrong and he's frozen for 500 years. When he's awakened from his frozen state, he learns that a nuclear war has made most of Earth uninhabitable. The war took place in a different universe and begins with a shortened remake of the movie). The date the series takes place is never explicitly pinned down, but the teenage character Bryce Lynch's birthdate was given in the movie and series pilot as October 7, 1988.
** You can still smoke in public buildings. It's a federal offense to turn your TV off. This being cyberpunk, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-zyRlcMi4&fmt=13#t=320 there is an Internet,]] though it gets called "The System", and the way it's shown to work is [[ItsASmallNetAfterAll pretty thoroughly gonzo]]. There are no reality shows. [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan rules the business world]]. Network news is filmed on camcorders. There is still a Soviet Union, which has colonized part of the Third World.
** Also transplantation "body banks" which will pay for fresh corpses, no questions asked.
* The setting (and almost-subtitle; they went with "Almost Tomorrow") of the second season of ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds''. Martial law. Bad air. Food shortages. Genetic engineering. "Totally real" VR simulations. [[TechMarchesOn Eight-bit computers]].
* ''Series/DarkAngel'' made in 2000, takes place in 2019, with a backstory where in 2009 terrorists set off an {{EMP}}, turning the United States into a third world hellhole. Which keeps it from looking too dated; ''Dark Angel'' 2019 looks like regular 2019 except shittier. The only significant technological differences are the {{Transhuman}} people running around, and they were a secret project anyway, and the PoliceState flying drones that look very similar to real world drones.
early 1990s.



* Made in 1978, but set in 2050, ''Series/ComeBackMrsNoah'' mostly portrayed its 'futuristic' status via the existence of gadgets such as the instantly boiling atomic kettle.
* Humorously invoked by Creator/ConanOBrien in his recurring "In the Year 2000" sketches: All of the "future" predictions are based on current events and celebrities. He took the joke even further by continuing the theme well past the arrival of the actual year 2000, although when he moved to ''Series/TheTonightShow'' it was finally updated to "In the Year 3000".
* ''Series/DarkAngel'' made in 2000, takes place in 2019, with a backstory where in 2009 terrorists set off an {{EMP}}, turning the United States into a third world hellhole. Which keeps it from looking too dated; ''Dark Angel'' 2019 looks like regular 2019 except shittier. The only significant technological differences are the {{Transhuman}} people running around, and they were a secret project anyway, and the PoliceState flying drones that look very similar to real world drones.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'' has many episodes with this kind of setting.
** Note that many of the stories explicitly set in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into the Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E3TheInvasion "The Invasion"]] and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead "Mawdryn Undead"]], but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in [[REcap/DoctorWhoS26E1Battlefield "Battlefield"]], the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a major topic of debate among fans, has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The Sontaran Stratagem"]] by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").
** In "Mawdryn Undead", producer John Nathan-Turner demanded that one of the story's time periods be 1977. This caused Script Editor Eric Saward incredible trauma, because he knew about the UNIT dating situation and, more importantly, he knew the fans knew and would pillory the creative team for the 1977 decision. This is exactly what happened.
** The Second Doctor's companion Zoe comes from the 21st century, but few dates are given for her era... until in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber "The Mind Robber"]] (aired in 1968), she is familiar with a cartoon character from the year 2000, implying that she's from a few years past that time at most. Or that she's a comics geek, which wouldn't be out of character for her.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet "The Tenth Planet"]] (1966) was set in the futuristic age of 1986, and features the discovery of Earth's twin planet of Mondas, which begins to siphon off Earth's energy. Come 1985, and the show's still running the story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E1AttackOfTheCybermen "Attack of the Cybermen"]] sees the Sixth Doctor heading off the titular attack before it affects the Mondas attack...
** All episodes set in the present day from 2005's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon "Aliens of London"]] to 2008's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]], inclusive, take place a year after the airing date. [[note]]2007's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] is a tiny exception to the rule, because the Doctor's only present-day appearance in that episode was after a one-year TimeSkip from a linear, subjective viewpoint. This means that "Blink" ''started'' in the year it aired but ''finished'' at the normal one-year-ahead point.[[/note]] This was due to "Aliens of London" being explicitly set a year after the first episode of the 2005 season. Thanks to the series taking a "gap year" in which only a handful of specials were aired, the series was able to align with present-day by the time the Tenth Doctor handed off to the Eleventh Doctor.
** The first decade of the 21st century in ''Ahistory: An Unauthorised History of the Doctor Who Universe'' makes interesting reading. The writer takes a deep breath and presents the CyberPunk near future of the 1990s [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse New Adventures novels]] and the PresentDay setting of the current series as happening at the same time, without further explanation. [[TimeyWimeyBall Wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey...]]
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight In the Forest of the Night]]", broadcast in 2014, included dialogue specifically dating it as taking place in 2016. As a result, all modern-day Earth episodes featuring companion Clara Oswald that followed (at least up until her departure in 2015) took place at least two years after their broadcast date. This, however, led to a ContinuitySnarl in the spinoff series ''Series/Class2016'', which is set in the year 2016, after the [[spoiler:death]] of Clara, which based on the dating established by the 2014 episode, did not occur until at least 2017, if not later.
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'' takes place at an unspecified point in the future where {{deceptively human robots}} exist.
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is presumably this... as the very least, it's suggested by the scenes set inside [[MegaCorp Massive Dynamics]] and particularly by Nina Sharp's... [[{{Cyborg}} generous enhancements]].
* ''Series/TheHandmaidsTale'': The series seems to be set not very far off, with the flashbacks in what's apparently present day. Tinder, Uber and Craigslist are mentioned. Luke is explicitly stated to have been born in 1980.
* ''Series/HeadOfTheClass'', where Howard Hessman's character comments at a reunion that his teacher's salary has finally reached six figures, and that even though teachers are now paid what they deserve, he's too old to enjoy it.
* ''Series/LostInSpace2018'': The series is set "30 years in the future", from an unspecified baseline that is most likely the show's release year (2018). The major difference is part of the show's premise: a meteor impact has caused serious environmental damage. Human society looks pretty similar but we have some cool computer tech and, of course, spaceships that can travel to Alpha Centauri.
* ''Series/MaxHeadroom'' is the trope namer. The original TV movie was entitled ''Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future'' and the phrase was reused in the opening sequence of the resultant TV series (which takes place in a different universe and begins with a shortened remake of the movie). The date the series takes place is never explicitly pinned down, but the teenage character Bryce Lynch's birthdate was given in the movie and series pilot as October 7, 1988.
** You can still smoke in public buildings. It's a federal offense to turn your TV off. This being cyberpunk, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86-zyRlcMi4&fmt=13#t=320 there is an Internet,]] though it gets called "The System", and the way it's shown to work is [[ItsASmallNetAfterAll pretty thoroughly gonzo]]. There are no reality shows. [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japan rules the business world]]. Network news is filmed on camcorders. There is still a Soviet Union, which has colonized part of the Third World.
** Also transplantation "body banks" which will pay for fresh corpses, no questions asked.
* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'' episode "The Duplicate Man", filmed in 1964, is set in 2025, when space travel is common, {{cloning|Blues}} has been outlawed and statues of alien lifeforms are exhibited in a museum. The smaller changes from the present are also interesting: future tech includes {{Video Phone}}s (with rotary dials!) and light-activated drinking fountains, and the protagonist wears an early [[Music/TheBeatles Beatles]]-style collarless suit and drives a CoolCar that's actually [[http://wearecontrollingtransmission.blogspot.com/2011/03/hot-wheels-chemospheres-chromoites.html a customized Buick Riviera]] created for the film ''For Those Who Think Young''.
* The seventh and final season of ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' was aired in 2015 and took place in 2017. It played with minor advances in technology, like holographic tablets made by new social media giant Gryzzl, and other celebrity and pop-culture news, e.g. [[HilariousInHindsight the Cubs winning the World Series]], Elton John owning Chic-Fil-A and Shailene Woodley and Morgan Freeman having an epic feud.



* The seventh and final season of ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' was aired in 2015 and took place in 2017. It played with minor advances in technology, like holographic tablets made by new social media giant Gryzzl, and other celebrity and pop-culture news, e.g. The Cubs winning the World Series, Elton John owning Chic-Fil-A and Shailene Woodley and Morgan Freeman having an epic feud.
* The setting of a bunch of episodes of ''Series/DoctorWho''. Note that many of the stories explicitly set in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into The Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, ''The Invasion'' and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in ''Mawdryn Undead'', but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in ''Battlefield'', the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a major topic of debate among fans, has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode "The Poison Sky" by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").
** In ''Mawdryn Undead'', producer John Nathan-Turner demanded that one of the story's time periods be 1977. This caused Script Editor Eric Saward incredible trauma, because he knew about the UNIT dating situation and, more importantly, he knew the fans knew and would pillory the creative team for the 1977 decision. This is exactly what happened.
** The Second Doctor's companion Zoe comes from the 21st century, but few dates are given for her era... until in ''The Mind Robber'' (aired in 1968), she is familiar with a cartoon character from the year 2000, implying that she's from a few years past that time at most. Or that she's a comics geek, which wouldn't be out of character for her.
** ''The Tenth Planet'' (1966) was set in the futuristic age of 1986, and features the discovery of Earth's twin planet of Mondas, which begins to siphon off Earth's energy. Come 1985, and the show's still running -- the story ''Attack of the Cybermen'' sees the Sixth Doctor heading off the titular attack before it affects the Mondas attack...
** All episodes set in the present day from 2005's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon "Aliens of London"]] to 2008's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]], inclusive, take place a year after the airing date. [[note]]2007's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] is a tiny exception to the rule, because the Doctor's only present-day appearance in that episode was after a one-year TimeSkip from a linear, subjective viewpoint. This means that "Blink" ''started'' in the year it aired but ''finished'' at the normal one-year-ahead point.[[/note]] This was due to "Aliens of London" being explicitly set a year after the first episode of the 2005 season. Thanks to the series taking a "gap year" in which only a handful of specials were aired, the series was able to align with present-day by the time the Tenth Doctor handed off to the Eleventh Doctor.
** The first decade of the 21st century in ''Ahistory: An Unauthorised History of the Doctor Who Universe'' makes interesting reading. The writer takes a deep breath and presents the CyberPunk near future of the 1990s [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse New Adventures novels]] and the PresentDay setting of the current series as happening at the same time, without further explanation. [[TimeyWimeyBall Wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey...]]
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight In the Forest of the Night]]", broadcast in 2014, included dialogue specifically dating it as taking place in 2016. As a result, all modern-day Earth episodes featuring companion Clara Oswald that followed (at least up until her departure in 2015) took place at least two years after their broadcast date. This, however, led to a ContinuitySnarl in the spinoff series ''Series/Class2016'', which is set in the year 2016, after the the [[spoiler: death]] of Clara, which based on the dating established by the 2014 episode, did not occur until at least 2017, if not later.

to:

* The seventh and final season ''Series/Space1999''. Still waiting for the Moon to be blasted out of ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' orbit.
* ''Series/SpaceIslandOne''
was aired in 2015 and took place in 2017. It played with minor advances in technology, like holographic tablets made by new social media giant Gryzzl, and other celebrity and pop-culture news, e.g. The Cubs winning the World Series, Elton John owning Chic-Fil-A and Shailene Woodley and Morgan Freeman having an epic feud.
* The setting of a bunch of episodes of ''Series/DoctorWho''. Note that many of the stories explicitly
set on a space station just a hair more advanced than would be possible today.
* Inverted in ''Series/StargateSG1''
in the 1990s and the 21st century aren't really Twenty Minutes Into The Future; they're really distant-future stories dated by a writer who didn't realize that the year 2000 really wasn't all that far off. However, ''The Invasion'' and subsequent UNIT stories were always intended to be set just a few years in the future. This was ignored in ''Mawdryn Undead'', but by UNIT's final classic-series appearance in ''Battlefield'', the setting was clearly re-established as the very-near future. The issue of "UNIT dating" (when exactly the UNIT stories take place, since there's a bucketload of contradictory evidence) is a major topic of debate among fans, has been parodied a number of times in the ExpandedUniverse and gets its own [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNIT_dating_controversy Wikipedia entry]] (it also got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the books and the New Series episode "The Poison Sky" by having Sarah Jane and the Doctor respectively say they "used to work for UNIT in the Seventies, or was it the Eighties?").
** In ''Mawdryn Undead'', producer John Nathan-Turner demanded that one of the story's time periods be 1977. This caused Script Editor Eric Saward incredible trauma, because he knew about the UNIT dating situation and, more importantly, he knew the fans knew and would pillory the creative team for the 1977 decision. This is exactly what happened.
** The Second Doctor's companion Zoe comes from the 21st century, but few dates are given for her era... until in ''The Mind Robber'' (aired in 1968), she is familiar
"2010", where contact with an advanced civilization willing to share technology makes 2010 a cartoon character from the year 2000, implying that she's from a few years past that time at most. Or that she's a comics geek, which wouldn't be out of character for her.
** ''The Tenth Planet'' (1966)
much different world than it was set in the futuristic age of 1986, and features the discovery of Earth's twin planet of Mondas, which begins to siphon off Earth's energy. Come 1985, and the show's still running -- the story ''Attack of the Cybermen'' sees the Sixth Doctor heading off the titular attack before it affects the Mondas attack...
** All episodes set in the present day from 2005's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E4AliensOfLondon "Aliens of London"]] to 2008's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End"]], inclusive, take place a year after the airing date. [[note]]2007's [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]] is a tiny exception to the rule, because the Doctor's only present-day appearance in that episode was after a one-year TimeSkip from a linear, subjective viewpoint. This means that "Blink" ''started'' in the year it aired but ''finished''
at the normal one-year-ahead point.[[/note]] This was due to "Aliens time of London" being explicitly set a year after filming. A very visible bit of {{Zeerust}} is the first episode fashions of the 2005 season. Thanks to the series this 2010: taking a "gap year" in which only a handful of specials were aired, the series was able to align with present-day by the time the Tenth Doctor handed off to the Eleventh Doctor.
** The first decade of the 21st century in ''Ahistory: An Unauthorised History of the Doctor Who Universe'' makes interesting reading. The writer takes a deep breath and presents the CyberPunk near future of the 1990s [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse New Adventures novels]] and the PresentDay setting of the current series as happening at the same time, without further explanation. [[TimeyWimeyBall Wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey...]]
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight In the Forest of the Night]]", broadcast in 2014, included dialogue specifically dating it as taking place in 2016. As a result, all modern-day Earth episodes featuring companion Clara Oswald
cue from ''Series/WildPalms'', President Kinsey wears an outfit that followed (at least up until her departure would look more at home in 2015) took place at least two years after their broadcast date. This, however, led to a ContinuitySnarl in the spinoff series ''Series/Class2016'', which is set in the year 2016, after the the [[spoiler: death]] of Clara, which based on the dating established by the 2014 episode, did not occur until at least 2017, if not later. ''1910''.



* Inverted in ''Series/StargateSG1'' in the episode "2010", where contact with an advanced civilization willing to share technology makes 2010 a much different world than it was at the time of filming. A very visible bit of {{Zeerust}} is the fashions of this 2010: taking a cue from ''Series/WildPalms'', President Kinsey wears an outfit that would look more at home in ''1910''.
* ''SpaceIslandOne'' was set on a space station just a hair more advanced than would be possible today.
* An interestingly related setting is that of ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''. The viewer is initially given no reference frame for when it occurs relative to Earth history, but it fits the pattern of Twenty Minutes into the Future in that it combines highly advanced, futuristic technology with a culture that is almost indistinguishable from the USA of 2005, down to the clothing. As the series progresses, more specific elements of American culture start appearing, and the fleet discovers [[spoiler: the post-apocalyptic remains of a planet they believe to be Earth, whose inhabitants also had a culture resembling 2000s America.]] Eventually, the series is revealed to be occurring somewhere around the year ''[[spoiler: 148,000 B.C.]]''. [[ArcWords All this has happened before and will happen again.]]
** The prequel series ''Caprica'', set about 50-60 years prior to the main series, follows the pattern to a degree by dressing the characters in fashions reminiscent of the '40s and '50s.
** In addition to similarities in clothing, the series features other modern-day elements, such as British rifles and American HMMW-Vs.
* ''Series/HeadOfTheClass'', where Howard Hessman's character comments at a reunion that his teacher's salary has finally reached six figures, and that even though teachers are now paid what they deserve, he's too old to enjoy it.
* The first season of ''Series/TwentyFour'', aired in 2001, was set in March 2004 (as retroactively indicated by a shot of a character's driver license shown in season 4), and each following season has been set a few years after the previous one. (The most recent season, the show's sixth, aired in 2007 and was set in 2013; the seventh season, which began in January 2009 is set in November 2017.) Could be [[NextSundayAD Twenty Seconds into the Future]] if not for the AppliedPhlebotinum (real-time satellite surveillance, handheld remote heartbeat sensors, &c.) that pops up from time to time.

to:

* Inverted The MTV sketch comedy show ''Series/TheState'' lampooned this idea with a sketch where a man wakes up in ''Series/StargateSG1'' a hospital after only a short time knocked out in an accident only to find that he missed the "most exciting 15 minutes in the history of the world", and now aliens have landed and all sorts of things have changed.
* The British 1970s series ''Series/TimeSlip'' showed several potential versions of the year 1990. Cloning. Melted polar icecaps. Longevity serums. Global computer control. Europe being geologically restructured to maximize efficiency. And computers were still room-size monstrosities with reel-to-reel tapes. And as to the sense of taste in décor, let us just say that it is truly fortunate for our corneas that only one
episode "2010", where contact with an advanced civilization willing to share technology makes 2010 a much different world than it has survived in its original color.
* ''Series/TheTribe''
was at the time of filming. A very visible bit of {{Zeerust}} is the fashions of this 2010: taking a cue from ''Series/WildPalms'', President Kinsey wears an outfit that would look more at home in ''1910''.
* ''SpaceIslandOne'' was set on a space station just a hair more advanced than would be possible today.
* An interestingly related setting is that of ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''. The viewer is initially given no reference frame for when it occurs relative to Earth history, but it fits the pattern of Twenty Minutes into the Future in that it combines highly advanced, futuristic technology with a culture that is almost indistinguishable from the USA of 2005, down to the clothing. As the series progresses, more specific elements of American culture start appearing, and the fleet discovers [[spoiler: the
post-apocalyptic remains of a planet they believe to be Earth, whose inhabitants also had a culture resembling 2000s America.]] Eventually, the series is revealed to be occurring somewhere around set in a Type 2 TeenageWasteland after a [[DepopulationBomb mysterious virus]] killed off all the year ''[[spoiler: 148,000 B.C.]]''. [[ArcWords All adults. Based on the technology commonly used and traded by the various Tribes (CD players, egg-shaped original iMacs, no iPods), the Virus struck some time in the late '90s or early '00s.
* Several episodes of the original ''[[Series/TheTwilightZone Twilight Zone]]'' were set in a future that has come and gone. Some episodes refer to the setting as "the day after tomorrow".
* Most entries of the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' are set in
this has happened before period, with things like colonization of the Moon or Mars being mentioned often, spaceflight being done regularly by pilots, and will happen again.]]
**
ray guns being the weapon of choice against the MonsterOfTheWeek, while everything else looks as it was in the years the show was produced in.
* ''{{Series/Viper}}'': In Season 2-4 the intro still mentions that the story takes place in the 21st century. But there are no futuristic concept cars like in Season 1 anymore. Even actor Jeff Kaake mentioned in an interview that the future setting was dropped for Season 3.
*
The prequel 1960s series ''Caprica'', set about 50-60 years prior to the main series, follows the pattern to a degree by dressing the characters in fashions reminiscent of the '40s and '50s.
** In addition to similarities in clothing, the series features other modern-day elements, such as British rifles and American HMMW-Vs.
* ''Series/HeadOfTheClass'', where Howard Hessman's character comments at a reunion that his teacher's salary has finally reached six figures, and that even though teachers are now paid what they deserve, he's too old to enjoy it.
* The first season of ''Series/TwentyFour'', aired in 2001,
''Series/VoyageToTheBottomOfTheSea'' was set in March 2004 (as retroactively indicated by a shot the 1970s-80s.
* The setting (and almost-subtitle; they went with "Almost Tomorrow")
of a character's driver license shown in the second season 4), and each following season has been set a few years after the previous one. (The most recent season, the show's sixth, aired in 2007 and was set in 2013; the seventh season, which began in January 2009 is set in November 2017.) Could be [[NextSundayAD Twenty Seconds into the Future]] if not for the AppliedPhlebotinum (real-time satellite surveillance, handheld remote heartbeat sensors, &c.) that pops up from time to time.of ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds''. Martial law. Bad air. Food shortages. Genetic engineering. "Totally real" VR simulations. [[TechMarchesOn Eight-bit computers]].



* The TV series (and [[Film/AlienNation the film]]) ''Series/AlienNation'' was set in the near-future of the late eighties/early nineties. The TV movies took place in the late 1990s and early 2000s: Emily was 13 in "Dark Horizon" and presumably between 16 and 18 in "The Udara Legacy", as she was still attending high school. The transition from TV series to TV movies involved some unfortunate timeline-tweaking with rather inconsistent aging.
** For the record, you could smoke in the police station, there were a few gags about non-existent sequels to famous movies (''Franchise/BackToTheFuture [[RidiculousFutureSequelization VI]]'', etc.), and by the TV movies they had video-phones... but the cars still looked distinctively Eighties.
*** At the time, they were using the most aerodynamic and "futuristic" looking cars they could get.
** Also, the computer user interfaces are also distinctively Eighties or "Graphic-DOS" styled, with no notion of CUA-like interfaces anywhere... but Internet has been replaced by something called "Optinet". One of the movies has a computer with a then-futuristic touch screen (running what looks basically like Windows 95).
* The British 1970s series ''TimeSlip'' showed several potential versions of the year 1990. Cloning. Melted polar icecaps. Longevity serums. Global computer control. Europe being geologically restructured to maximize efficiency. And computers were still room-size monstrosities with reel-to-reel tapes. And as to the sense of taste in decor, let us just say that it is truly fortunate for our corneas that only one episode has survived in its original color.
* ''Series/Space1999''. Still waiting for the moon to be blasted out of orbit.
* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1963'' episode "The Duplicate Man", filmed in 1964, is set in 2025, when space travel is common, {{cloning|Blues}} has been outlawed and statues of alien lifeforms are exhibited in a museum. The smaller changes from the present are also interesting: future tech includes {{Video Phone}}s (with rotary dials!) and light-activated drinking fountains, and the protagonist wears an early [[Music/TheBeatles Beatles]]-style collarless suit and drives a CoolCar that's actually [[http://wearecontrollingtransmission.blogspot.com/2011/03/hot-wheels-chemospheres-chromoites.html a customized Buick Riviera]] created for the film ''For Those Who Think Young''.
* Most entries of the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' are set in this period, with things like colonization of the Moon or Mars being mentioned often, spaceflight being done regularly by pilots, and ray guns being the weapon of choice against the MonsterOfTheWeek, while everything else looks as it was in the years the show was produced in.
* Humorously invoked by Creator/ConanOBrien in his recurring "In the Year 2000" sketches: All of the "future" predictions are based on current events and celebrities. He took the joke even further by continuing the theme well past the arrival of the actual year 2000, although when he moved to ''Series/TheTonightShow'' it was finally updated to "In the Year 3000".
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' is presumably this... as the very least, it's suggested by the scenes set inside [[MegaCorp Massive Dynamics]] and particularly by Nina Sharp's... [[{{Cyborg}} generous enhancements]].
* The 1960s series ''Series/VoyageToTheBottomOfTheSea'' was set in the 1970s-80s.
* Several episodes of the original ''[[Series/TheTwilightZone Twilight Zone]]'' were set in a future that has come and gone. Some episodes refer to the setting as "the day after tomorrow".
* In the 1979 movie and subsequent TV series ''Series/BuckRogersInTheTwentyFifthCentury'', the titular character, Buck begins his journey in 1987 in a deep space probe that was supposed to last a few months. Something goes wrong and he's frozen for 500 years. When he's awakened from his frozen state, he learns that a nuclear war has made most of Earth uninhabitable. The war took place in the early 1990s.
* ''Series/TheTribe'' was a post-apocalyptic series set in a Type 2 TeenageWasteland after a [[DepopulationBomb mysterious virus]] killed off all the adults. Based on the technology commonly used and traded by the various Tribes (CD players, egg-shaped original iMacs, no iPods), the Virus struck some time in the late '90s or early '00s.
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'' takes place at an unspecified point in the future where {{deceptively human robots}} exist.
* ''{{Series/Viper}}'': In Season 2-4 the intro still mentions that the story takes place in the 21st century. But there are no futuristic concept cars like in Season 1 anymore. Even actor Jeff Kaake mentioned in an interview that the future setting was dropped for Season 3.
* ''Series/TheHandmaidsTale'': The series seems to be set not very far off, with the flashbacks in what's apparently present day. Tinder, Uber and Craigslist are mentioned. Luke is explicitly stated to have been born in 1980.
* ''Series/LostInSpace2018'': The series is set "30 years in the future", from an unspecified baseline that is most likely the show's release year (2018). The major difference is part of the show's premise: a meteor impact has caused serious environmental damage. Human society looks pretty similar but we have some cool computer tech and, of course, spaceships that can travel to Alpha Centauri.
* Made in 1978, but set in 2050, ''Series/ComeBackMrsNoah'' mostly portrayed its 'futuristic' status via the existence of gadgets such as the instantly boiling atomic kettle.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 349

Top