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Naturally, this also happens when translating works into other languages. However, languages left untranslated in the original may still be left untranslated in the translation. (Of course, in literature, this can cause problems if the language left untranslated in the original is the language being translated into, though [[KeepItForeign translating that into the original language]] often works. On TV, you can [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign just use gibberish]].) Because of this, English-speaking viewers are actually the least likely to be the most shocked by this trope. For example, in the French version of Pearl Harbor, the Americans speak French while the Japanese speak Japanese.

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Naturally, this also happens when translating works into other languages. However, languages left untranslated in the original may still be left untranslated in the translation. (Of course, in literature, this can cause problems if the language left untranslated in the original is the language being translated into, though [[KeepItForeign translating that into the original language]] often works. On TV, you can [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign just use gibberish]].) Because of this, English-speaking viewers are actually the least likely to be the most shocked by this trope. For example, in the French version of Pearl Harbor, ''Pearl Harbor'', the Americans speak French while the Japanese speak Japanese.

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**Some have mocked that Sean Connery's Soviet submarine captain speaks with a ''Scottish'' accent during these translation-convention scenes, but this might be a case of FridgeBrilliance: it's stated that Ramius isn't Russian, he's Lithuanian...so maybe that's just a Scottish accent [[AccentAdaptation standing in for]] Lithuanian-accented Russian.


* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' is the TropeNamer for TranslatorMicrobes, but the only main characters who speak English are Crichton (TokenHuman) and Shanu ({{Omniglot}} who can't use the microbes), so nearly every scene without either of them uses the convention.

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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' is the TropeNamer for TranslatorMicrobes, but the only main characters who speak English are Crichton (TokenHuman) and Shanu Sikozu ({{Omniglot}} who can't use the microbes), so nearly every scene without either of them uses the convention.


* ''Film/NightTrainToLisbon'': It's unclear, though most of the time the characters are apparently ''not'' speaking English, but rather Portuguese and perhaps German in Bern.



* [[https://charges.uol.com.br/piadadodia.php?idpiada=1004 This joke features two Argentines in Brazil]]. Their dialogue is in Brazilian Portuguese instead of Latin-American Spanish and there's a note stating the translation was made for two reasons: to make the joke easier to understand and because whoever wrote the joke didn't know Spanish.

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* [[https://charges.uol.com.br/piadadodia.php?idpiada=1004 This joke features two Argentines in Brazil]]. Their dialogue is in Brazilian Portuguese instead of Latin-American Latin American Spanish and there's a note stating the translation was made for two reasons: to make the joke easier to understand and because whoever wrote the joke didn't know Spanish.

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* Several subtly different variants on this trope are employed in ''FanFic/TheDragonKingsTemple''. When we're in the perspective of the SG-1 characters, [[ShapedLikeItself English is rendered as English]] while Asyuntian is rendered as phonetically transliterated Japanese (not because Asyuntian actually ''is'' Japanese, or even related to it in any meaningful way, but simply because the author spoke Japanese well enough to play games with it and had neither the time nor the talent to create an entirely new language a la Tolkien). When we're in the perspective of the Asyuntian characters, however, Asyuntian is rendered as English while English is phonetically transliterated according to "Asyuntian" rules of pronunciation (since the Asyuntians don't speak English).

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* ''ComicBook/StarTrekEarlyVoyages'': In the two-part story "Cloak and Dagger", the Vulcans of Darien 224 speak an ancient version of the Vulcan language. It is rendered in English with "<< >>" brackets when they are speaking among themselves. However, when they are speaking to the ''Enterprise'' crew, the brackets are absent as their language is being translated by the [[TranslatorMicrobes universal translator]].

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* In Episode 19 of the anime adaptation of ''Literature/RunWithTheWind'', the inner monologue of the Tanzanian exchange student Musa is said in Japanese presumably for the audience's benefit.

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* ''Film/PathsOfGlory'' is set in [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne WW1]]-era France, and all the characters are members of the French military. Nevertheless, everyone speaks perfect English throughout the film.


* Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-earth works: All of our real-world languages do not exist in Middle-earth, and so the common TranslationConvention applies. When not convention-translated, names and speech make use of Tolkien's constructed languages, or also of one of the real-world languages used as stand-ins for a fictional one (done do convey the relation of the respective 'proper' languages). Concerning the latter use: The lingua franca of the Third Age (''Literature/TheHobbit'', ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''), "Westron" (aka the "Common Speech"), is ''always'' rendered as English in the texts, as it is the POV-character's language. Others are regularly replaced by stand-in languages based on their relationship to Westron: Rohirric language by Anglo-Saxon/Old English (as it is an archaic version of Westron), and the language used by the Dwarves and the Men of Dale by Old Norse. Information on what these languages 'really' look like [[AllThereInTheManual can only be found in additional texts]]. E.g.: Bilbo and Frodo Baggin's actual, 'non-translated' names are ''Bilba'' and ''Maura Labingi'' (yes, the 'real' hobbit names have masculine endings in -a, feminine in -e and -o).

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* Creator/JRRTolkien's [[Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium Middle-earth works: works]]: All of our real-world languages do not exist in Middle-earth, and so the common TranslationConvention applies. When not convention-translated, names and speech make use of Tolkien's constructed languages, or also of one of the real-world languages used as stand-ins for a fictional one (done do convey the relation of the respective 'proper' languages). Concerning the latter use: The lingua franca of the Third Age (''Literature/TheHobbit'', ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''), "Westron" (aka the "Common Speech"), is ''always'' rendered as English in the texts, as it is the POV-character's language. Others are regularly replaced by stand-in languages based on their relationship to Westron: Rohirric language by Anglo-Saxon/Old English (as it is an archaic version of Westron), and the language used by the Dwarves and the Men of Dale by Old Norse. Information on what these languages 'really' look like [[AllThereInTheManual can only be found in additional texts]]. E.g.: Bilbo and Frodo Baggin's actual, 'non-translated' names are ''Bilba'' and ''Maura Labingi'' (yes, the 'real' hobbit names have masculine endings in -a, feminine in -e and -o).

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* ''Webcomic/ApricotCookies'': All the dialogue is supposed to be translated from Japanese, which is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] when they meet a tourist who asks them if they speak English.


** Another exception is whenever someone makes a [[AltumVidetur classic Latin quote]] ("Alea jacta est", "O tempora o mores", etc) which appears untranslated (Pegleg the pirate does this [[OncePerEpisode Once per Album]]).

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** Another exception is whenever someone makes a [[AltumVidetur [[GratuitousLatin classic Latin quote]] ("Alea jacta est", "O tempora o mores", etc) which appears untranslated (Pegleg the pirate does this [[OncePerEpisode Once per Album]]).


* Near-constant in ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure''. English, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, French, Hindi, Arabic, and others are all presented as Japanese -- hardly surprising when, on the whole, very little of the series is actually set in Japan. However, when Koichi heads to Italy and confronts Giorno, Giorno commends him on his fluency in Italian, which Koichi lets slip that it was the result of Rohan using Heaven's Door on him. Regardless, both are presented as speaking in Japanese to the reader. From the same part, all currencies are expressed in Japanese yen, despite ''Vento Aureo'' taking place in Italy.

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* Near-constant in ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure''. English, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, French, Hindi, Arabic, and others are all presented as Japanese -- hardly Japanese--hardly surprising when, on the whole, very little of the series is actually set in Japan. However, when Koichi heads to Italy and confronts Giorno, Giorno commends him on his fluency in Italian, which Koichi lets slip that it was the result of Rohan using Heaven's Door on him. Regardless, both are presented as speaking in Japanese to the reader. From the same part, all currencies are expressed in Japanese yen, despite ''Vento Aureo'' taking place in Italy.



* Any Creator/WilliamShakespeare play set somewhere other than England uses this trope, sometimes with one or two easily-translated words left in the original language (such as "mi perdonata" [[note]] pardon me[[/note]] in ''Theatre/TheTamingOfTheShrew).'' ''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' pokes fun at the convention, with the Italian Portia complaining about not being able to speak with "the young Baron of England":

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* Any Creator/WilliamShakespeare play set somewhere other than England uses this trope, sometimes with one or two easily-translated words left in the original language (such as "mi perdonata" [[note]] pardon me[[/note]] in ''Theatre/TheTamingOfTheShrew).'' ''
**
''Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice'' pokes fun at the convention, with the Italian Portia complaining about not being able to speak with "the young Baron of England":



* In Theatre/JuliusCaesar, the characters are presumably speaking Latin, which becomes English for our (the audience’s) benefit. But when does what they are speaking become (again for our benefit) Latin? It seems that just as when they seem to speak English it represents them speaking Latin, when they seem to speak Latin, it is to show that they are really speaking Greek. Caesar’s anguished “Et tu, Brute!” on the Elizabethan stage represented his Greek fifteen hundred years before. (from the other Wiki): The phrase evidently follows in the tradition of the Roman historian Suetonius, who reports that others have claimed Caesar's last words were the Greek phrase "καὶ σὺ τέκνον;" (transliterated as "Kai su, teknon", meaning "You too, my child?" in English or "Tu quoque, Brute, fili mi" in Latin). Caesar is known to have spoken excellent Greek and there would be nothing strange in this. Suetonius himself claims Caesar said nothing as he died.

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* ** In Theatre/JuliusCaesar, the characters are presumably speaking Latin, which becomes English for our (the audience’s) our, the audience’s, benefit. But when does what they are speaking become (again for our benefit) Latin? It seems that just as when they seem to speak English it represents them speaking Latin, when they seem to speak Latin, it is to show that they are really speaking Greek. Caesar’s anguished “Et tu, Brute!” on the Elizabethan stage represented his Greek fifteen hundred years before. (from the other Wiki): The phrase evidently follows in the tradition of the Roman historian Suetonius, who reports that others have claimed Caesar's last words were the Greek phrase "καὶ σὺ τέκνον;" (transliterated as "Kai su, teknon", meaning "You too, my child?" in English or "Tu quoque, Brute, fili mi" in Latin). Caesar is known to have spoken excellent Greek and there would be nothing strange in this. Suetonius himself claims Caesar said nothing as he died.died.
** In ''Theatre/{{Pericles}}'' it's explicitly stated that "By you being pardoned, we commit no crime to use one language in each several clime where our scene seems to live."


* ''Literature/Nightfall1990'', by Creator/IssacAsimov and Creator/RobertSilverberg: The foreword explains the reasoning behind applying English words for things that were not in English, such as using "miles" for distance rather than the more alien "vorks".

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* ''Literature/Nightfall1990'', by Creator/IssacAsimov Creator/IsaacAsimov and Creator/RobertSilverberg: The foreword explains the reasoning behind applying English words for things that were not in English, such as using "miles" for distance rather than the more alien "vorks".


* ''WesternAnimation/IsleOfDogs'' has all of the dogs' speech translated into English. The frequnt Japanese dialogue is not.

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* ''WesternAnimation/IsleOfDogs'' has all of the dogs' speech translated into English. The frequnt frequent Japanese dialogue is not.


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* The Brazilian film ''Film/BatalhaDosGuararapes'' features the antagonistic Dutchmen speaking perfect Portuguese just like the locals. They don't even try putting on a distinctive accent.

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