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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'': While the game itself is set during 1909, it fits many of the tropes associated with the Wild West. The game even has three distinct acts, with the first being the Standard Western (good guys, bad guys, etc), the second taking the form of the SpaghettiWestern (moral ambiguity), and the third and final act set in the [[TwilightOfTheOldWest Dying West]].

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'': While the game itself is set during 1909, 1911, it fits many of the tropes associated with the Wild West. The game even has three distinct acts, with the first being the Standard Western (good guys, bad guys, etc), the second taking the form of the SpaghettiWestern (moral ambiguity), and the third and final act set in the [[TwilightOfTheOldWest Dying West]].


* ''Roleply/SurvivalOfTheFittest'': Virtua-SOTF, a Mini site game, has been confirmed to be a [[InsideAComputerSystem Virtual Reality]] game that takes place in a "Old West" setting.

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* ''Roleply/SurvivalOfTheFittest'': ''Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest'': Virtua-SOTF, a Mini site game, has been confirmed to be a [[InsideAComputerSystem Virtual Reality]] game that takes place in a "Old West" setting.


!!Popular tropes from this time period are:
[[index]]
* AdventureTowns: Many towns were depicted as havens of debauchery.
* AntiHero: ...would draw before the villain.
* BadassBandolier: Especially during the Mexican Revolution.
* BadassBeard
* BadassLongcoat: One could argue this fashion arose from the long duster coats which were commonly worn in this period, and which mythical cowboys -- and cool guys in general -- have been wearing ever since.
* BadassMustache
* BanditClan: The Dalton gang and UsefulNotes/JesseJames had family members in them.
* BarBrawl
* BlackAndGrayMorality: The villains are usually ruthless, greedy and despicable characters. On the other hand the "heroes" are not exactly noble guys either. See AntiHero above.
* BlastingItOutOfTheirHands: Usually only when an unrealistically pure good guy is shooting.
* BoomTown: The gold rush created many towns raised in places where people presumably could find gold.
* BountyHunter: With so many outlaws being around some people made it a profession to track them down in order to get the reward for their capture.
* CardSharp: Some people were very good with cards, almost too good at times. If you were lucky you were just tarred and feathered for cheating.
* CaliforniaDoubling: The geography of the American West is varied, but most movies tend to take place in Monument Valley. {{Spaghetti Western}}s often used the Tabernas Desert in Andalusia, Spain to double for America.
* CoolGuns: The Colt M1873 and Winchester lever action rifle have acquired legendary status to present day.
* CoolTrain: So cool that if you find railroad clipart or caricatures, chances are, it's designed around the kind of trains used in the American West.
* CountryMusic: The genre originated here.
* CowboyEpisode: When TheWildWest seeps into a series that isn't TheWestern.
* CrapsackWorld: Rampant lawlessness. Constant war with Indians. Everyone carries guns. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Very little opportunities]] [[TheDungAges for a bath]]. Why did anyone ever romanticize this period?
* TheDrifter
* FeudingFamilies: The Hatfield–[=McCoy=] feud is the most famous example of two families fighting one another to the death. Interestingly enough, their descendants have reconciled and strongly distanced themselves from their violent predecessors. Still, all stories set in the Wild West that depict a rivalry between two families will be based on them.
* FriendlyLocalChinatown: This time period was when Chinese people were starting to immigrate to the US, forming the first ever Chinatowns. Expect to see a ChineseLaunderer.
* GamblingBrawl: Cowboys like to bring guns to a poker game.
* GatlingGood: For superior firepower in any gunfight.
* GhostTown: Whenever a place was no longer economically profitable it would soon die out.
* GunsAkimbo: A JustifiedTrope--with the single-action revolvers of the period, it was quicker to fire one gun, then fire the second while you were cocking the first. It was just as inaccurate as it is today, though.
* TheGunslinger
* TheGunfighterWannabe: Characters will frequently try to be a tough and quick sharp shooter, but be the laughing stock of the actual gun experts.
* HangingJudge: Roy Bean is a historical example, though his legend has been exaggerated.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, UsefulNotes/BillyTheKid, UsefulNotes/CalamityJane, Frank & UsefulNotes/JesseJames, Wild Bill Hickok, Geronimo, Roy Bean, Creator/BuffaloBill, among many others.
* HumansAreWhite: Although historically about a third of all cowboys were black or Hispanic (And the word "cowboy" itself originally referred specifically to black farmhands), it wasn't until the 1960s that ''any'' black people started showing up in Westerns, and not until the 1970s that they started being main cast members.
* KirksRock: Frequently used in Westerns due to its convenience to Hollywood.
* KnightErrant: The "wandering gunslinger" variation.
* MobileKiosk: Most of the alleged doctors in the Wild West would travel by wagon from town to town selling a 'miracle elixir' said to cure whatever ailment they could come up with. These show up in Westerns from time to time.
* {{Outlaw}}: Many criminals are wanted "dead or alive".
* PriceOnTheirHead: Someone is willing to pay for this character, dead or alive.
* QuickDraw: A trope that shows up in the ShowdownAtHighNoon.
* RaceLift:
** For every time someone says Crazy Horse's father was white, even though he inherited his name from his father.
** In general, most depictions of classic cowboys in media show them as disproportionately white. While there obviously were white cowboys, there was also a much higher percentage of black, Asian, Latin, and Native American cowboys than is typically portrayed in the media.
* TheRemnant: A number of outlaw bands are made up of ex-Confederate soldiers who just kept fighting [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the war]] even after it ended.
* RidingIntoTheSunset: The best way to end your western, so that the hero can go off to new adventures.
* RunForTheBorder: A typical tactic by many outlaws wanted in one state.
* TheSavageSouth: Typically there is more lawlessness and danger in the southern areas than the northern ones. This is especially common in the unrest of the years following the Civil War.
* SawedOffShotgun: Typical Western guns were always shorter and lighter compared to what a modern rifleman may use, since they were designed to be fired from horseback.
* SettlingTheFrontier: Settlers and new settlements play a major role in many Westerns.
* TheSheriff: Even though sheriffs have existed since the Middle Ages, most people automatically think of a sheriff as depicted in the cowboy era, with a big moustache and a star badge on his chest.
* ShowdownAtHighNoon: Cowboys will settle matters at high noon in a duel.
* SmokingBarrelBlowout: Gunbarrels are more likely to smoke in the first place than in later eras with higher quality gunpowder.
* SnakeOilSalesman: There were a lot of cunning tricksters around in those days.
* TarAndFeathers: A common humiliating punishment for people who didn't obey the laws.
* ThrowawayGuns: Revolvers are slow to reload, so a good gunfighter will have several to draw from as the previous go empty. Rare in RealLife, as modern guns and ammo during the 1870s were too expensive for most poor people on the frontier.
* TorchesAndPitchforks: The lynch mob, ready and willing to dispense the death penalty without trial. Sometimes a desperate enforcement of justice in a land far from the law; sometimes a murder attempt that the Sheriff must protect a prisoner from. The more settled a region is, the worse the mob will be viewed. (Since you could bring in the law.)
* TrainJob: A setting with a lot of trains and a lot of criminals naturally leads to a lot of train robberies.
* WantedPoster: Expect to see them all over town, especially if the bad man featured on it is the BigBad, one of his henchmen, or at least relevant to the plot. In some cases even the good guy might end up on one if he's been wrongly accused and needs to prove his innocence.
* TheWestern: The genre that takes place here.
* WesternCharacters: The full collection of stock characters of Westerns are listed on this page.
[[/index]]
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** A ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode saw Lt Worf and son in a holodeck simulation set in this era.

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** A The ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS6E8AFistfulOfDatas A Fistful of Datas]]" saw Lt Lt. Worf and his son Alexander in a holodeck simulation set in this era.



** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS3E85ShowdownWithRanceMcGrew Showdown with Rance McGrew]]", the title character, a conceited actor who plays UsefulNotes/JesseJames in a [[TheWestern Western TV series]], is transported back in time to the Wild West and meets the real Jesse James.

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** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS3E85ShowdownWithRanceMcGrew Showdown with Rance McGrew]]", the title character, a conceited actor who plays UsefulNotes/JesseJames a hero named after himself in a [[TheWestern Western TV series]], series]] featuring UsefulNotes/JesseJames, is transported back in time to the Wild West and meets the real Jesse James.


* Several episodes of ''Series/TheTwilightZone''

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* Several episodes ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'':
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZone1959S1E3MrDentonOnDoomsday Mr. Denton on Doomsday]]", Al Denton was once the fastest gun in the West but he became [[TheAlcoholic a severe alcoholic]] when the latest man to challenge him turned out to be a sixteen-year-old boy. Like all
of ''Series/TheTwilightZone''the others, he killed him. Denton gets a second change from a peddler named Henry J. Fate.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS1E26Execution Execution]]", as he is about to be hanged for murder on November 14, 1880, Joe Caswell is transported forward in time to 1960 by Professor Manion.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS2E48Dust Dust]]", in a Wild West village "built of crumbling clay and rotting wood," a man named Luis Gallegos, who got drunk, went out in his wagon and struck and killed a little girl, is about to be hanged. A peddler named Sykes arrives in town and tells Gallegos' father that he can save his son by spreading special dust, which will cause the crowd to have a change of heart.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS2E59AHundredYardsOverTheRim A Hundred Yards over the Rim]]", while searching for a source of food and water for his wagon train in 1847, Chris Horn is transported forward in time to UsefulNotes/NewMexico in September 1961.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS3E72TheGrave The Grave]]", the hired gunman Conny Miller arrives in a western town to discover that his rival Pinto Sykes, a notorious outlaw, has been killed by the townsfolk. Conny learns that Pinto make a vow to reach up from his grave and grab Conny if he ever came close to it.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS3E85ShowdownWithRanceMcGrew Showdown with Rance McGrew]]", the title character, a conceited actor who plays UsefulNotes/JesseJames in a [[TheWestern Western TV series]], is transported back in time to the Wild West and meets the real Jesse James.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS5E130The7thIsMadeUpOfPhantoms The 7th Is Made Up of Phantoms]]", Sgt. William Connors, Corporal Richard Langsford and Private Michael [=McCluskey=], three US Army soldiers from 1964, are transported back in time to the Battle of Little Bighorn on June 25, 1876.
** In "[[Recap/TheTwilightZoneS5E152MrGarrityAndTheGraves Mr. Garrity and the Graves]]", the peddler Jared Garrity arrives in the small town of Happines, UsefulNotes/{{Arizona}} in 1890. He claims that he can [[BackFromTheDead bring the dead back to life]].

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* ''ComicBook/JusticeRiders'': An {{Elseworlds}} tale following the Justice League equivalent in the wild west on Earth-18. [[ComicBook/WonderWoman Diana Prince]] is a super-powered Sheriff in this world, and her traditional lasso fits in well with the aesthetic.

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* TrainJob: A setting with a lot of trains and a lot of criminals naturally leads to a lot of train robberies.


TheThemeParkVersion of the old west is a land of Indians, grizzled prospectors, scenic bluffs, Conestoga wagons, tough, shotgun-toting pioneers and buxom, be-feathered dance-hall girls. Also home to very lucrative [[SoftGlass sugar glass]] and balsa-wood chair industries, judging by the number of {{bar brawl}}s which occur during a single episode of a typical western series. [[{{Villains}} Bad guys]] and [[AntiHero anti-heroes]] wear black hats, good guys and sheriffs wear white hats, shootouts on Main Street occur with the frequency of at least one an hour--with the sun at high noon each time--and everyone drinks sarsaparilla or whiskey.

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TheThemeParkVersion of the old west Old West is a land of Indians, grizzled prospectors, scenic bluffs, Conestoga wagons, tough, shotgun-toting pioneers and buxom, be-feathered dance-hall girls. Also home to very lucrative [[SoftGlass sugar glass]] and balsa-wood chair industries, judging by the number of {{bar brawl}}s which occur during a single episode of a typical western series. [[{{Villains}} Bad guys]] and [[AntiHero anti-heroes]] wear black hats, good guys and sheriffs wear white hats, shootouts on Main Street occur with the frequency of at least one an hour--with the sun at high noon each time--and everyone drinks sarsaparilla or whiskey.


The American Old West was the land west of the Mississippi River roughly in or around the latter half of the nineteenth century; specifically we might start it at the California [[GoldFever Gold Rush]] of 1848 and end it at the U.S. Census Bureau's official recognition in 1890 [[EndOfAnAge of the end of the frontier]]. This setting is home to TheWestern, a definitively American genre almost as stylized and standardized as ''CommediaDellArte''. The Wild West is basically the ThemeParkVersion or fictionalization of this setting. It has its own set of specialized subtropes, including a wide assortment of [[WesternCharacters stock character types]] and its own specialized locations.

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The American Old West was the land west of the Mississippi River roughly in or around the latter half of the nineteenth century; specifically we might start it at what we now think of as the "Wild West" era with the California [[GoldFever Gold Rush]] of 1848 and end it at with the U.S. Census Bureau's official recognition in 1890 [[EndOfAnAge of the end of the frontier]]. This setting is home to TheWestern, a definitively American genre almost as stylized and standardized as ''CommediaDellArte''. The Wild West is basically the ThemeParkVersion or fictionalization of this setting. It has its own set of specialized subtropes, including a wide assortment of [[WesternCharacters stock character types]] and its own specialized locations.


[[caption-width-right:30-:And that's just what they could fit on the poster!]]

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[[caption-width-right:30-:And [[caption-width-right:300:And that's just what they could fit on the poster!]]


[[quoteright:307:[[Creator/BuffaloBill https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/buffalobill1_2700.jpg]] ]]
[[caption-width-right:307:And that's just what they could fit on the poster!]]

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[[quoteright:307:[[Creator/BuffaloBill [[quoteright:300:[[Creator/BuffaloBill https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/buffalobill1_2700.jpg]] ]]
[[caption-width-right:307:And [[caption-width-right:30-:And that's just what they could fit on the poster!]]



-->-- '''Creator/SamuelFuller''', director of three Westerns.

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-->-- '''Creator/SamuelFuller''', director of three Westerns.
film {{Western}}s.

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2'': A prequel to its predecessor set in 1899. It very much straddles the line between the Old West and the TwilightOfTheOldWest.


** In ''Desert Demolition Starring [[WesternAnimation/WileECoyoteAndTheRoadRunner Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote]]'', the "Buttes and Ladders" level takes place in a western town.

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** In ''Desert Demolition ''VideoGame/DesertDemolition Starring [[WesternAnimation/WileECoyoteAndTheRoadRunner Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote]]'', the "Buttes and Ladders" level takes place in a western town.


The real Old West was nothing like TheThemeParkVersion (which was originally the creation of 19th-century "dime novels"). There weren't any huge shootouts, quickdraw duels were rare, and gun duels and violent gun-wielding criminals weren't exclusive to desert-like "western" areas. Plus, since many guns were very inaccurate in those days, they sometimes tended to happen in significantly closer quarters than they do in fiction. The average Western town had 1.5 murders per year, and most of those weren't done with guns (due to the West having a relatively small population compared to the East). Carrying guns in these towns was more likely to get you arrested than shot, and you were much more likely to die from diseases like cholera, dysentery, and tuberculosis, or in an accident like being dragged by your own horse, than to be killed in a raging gunfight or get scalped by Indians. Although, by all means, it was still a lawless and violent era, with three major 19th-century American wars taking place in the frontier (the [[MexicanAmericanWar Mexican-American war]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the Civil War]] and the American Indian Wars) and also other range wars, bandit attacks and feuds. Not to mention that courts were almost non-existent, so settlers substituted with vigilance committees, which were more focused on lynching people than doing any law practices. But overall, the Wild West was not so wild -- it was actually more simple and boring, in fact.

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The real Old West was nothing like TheThemeParkVersion (which was originally the creation of 19th-century "dime novels"). There weren't any huge shootouts, quickdraw duels were rare, and gun duels and violent gun-wielding criminals weren't exclusive to desert-like "western" areas. Plus, since many guns were very inaccurate in those days, they sometimes tended to happen in significantly closer quarters than they do in fiction. The average Western town had 1.5 murders per year, and most of those weren't done with guns (due to the West having a relatively small population compared to the East). Carrying guns in these towns was more likely to get you arrested than shot, and you were much more likely to die from diseases like cholera, dysentery, and tuberculosis, or in an accident like being dragged by your own horse, than to be killed in a raging gunfight or get scalped by Indians. Although, by all means, it was still a lawless and violent era, with three major 19th-century American wars taking place in the frontier (the [[MexicanAmericanWar Mexican-American war]], [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar, the Civil War]] UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar and the American Indian Wars) and also other range wars, bandit attacks and feuds. Not to mention that courts were almost non-existent, so settlers substituted with vigilance committees, which were more focused on lynching people than doing any law practices. But overall, the Wild West was not so wild -- it was actually more simple and boring, in fact.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Varmints}}''

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