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Shangri La ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS sometimes spelled without the dash]]) comes from the 1933 novel ''Literature/LostHorizon'' by James Hilton. It is likely a variation on "Shambala" (aka [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Sambhalah, Shamballa, or Xiangbala]]), the Asian mythical kingdom. Depictions are almost always based on Tibet, with the monkish religion a [[TheThemeParkVersion highly watered-down]] variant of Lamaist Buddhism.

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Shangri La ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS sometimes spelled without the dash]]) comes from the 1933 novel ''Literature/LostHorizon'' by James Hilton. It is likely a variation on "Shambala" (aka [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Sambhalah, Shamballa, or Xiangbala]]), the [[Myth/TibetanMythology Asian mythical kingdom.kingdom]]. Depictions are almost always based on Tibet, with the monkish religion a [[TheThemeParkVersion highly watered-down]] variant of Lamaist Buddhism.


* ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'' has Mystical Pique, a snowy mountain with Himalayan-style architecture, prayer flags and meditating fakirs.

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* ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'' has Mystical Pique, a snowy mountain with Himalayan-style Tibetan-style architecture, prayer flags and meditating fakirs.

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* ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'' has Mystical Pique, a snowy mountain with Himalayan-style architecture, prayer flags and meditating fakirs.

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[[quoteright:350:[[Film/LostHorizon https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/lost_horizon_shangri_la.jpg]]]]


[[folder: Fanfic]]

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[[folder: Fanfic]][[folder:Fanfic]]


* Marvel again: Atillan, the home city of ''ComicBook/TheInhumans'', is located in the Himalayan mountains. While it isn't entirely this trope, some of the Inhumans (especially Karnak) use MagicalMartialArts.

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* Marvel again: Atillan, Attilan, the home city of ''ComicBook/TheInhumans'', is located in the Himalayan mountains. While it isn't entirely this trope, some of the Inhumans (especially Karnak) use MagicalMartialArts.


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[[folder: Fanfic]]

* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' has a more realistic version of this in Gorakhnath's sanctuary in the sequel. It's in a beautiful valley in the Himalayas (India, specifically), it has a shrine, and there's at least one acolyte (a [[SuperSoldier superpowered ex ChildSoldier]]). However, the valley is not noted as being particularly more beautiful or mystical than any around it, it's noted as being very cold (especially in December), and Gorakhnath himself mostly just looks like a farmer in late middle age. Additionally, while he's willing to teach, that willingness only extends to those actually present to learn (such as Harry, at Strange's request), rather than just boost their 'spiritual' cred: 'even the most enlightened of souls is not immune to the temptation to give a tourist a thick ear to match their thick skull.'

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* ''Film/DoctorStrange2016'' has Kamar-Taj - though unlike most, it's HiddenInPlainSight in Kathmandu (or at least, the main doorway is), with the entrance being a rundown door that's directly contrasted with the flashier temples across the street. While it is a beautiful mountainous landscape, it also has wifi, the MagicLibrarian (Wong) listens to Beyonce on his iPod, and the mystic arts are explained in terms of spells and magic, but also as programs using extradimensional energy to achieve various effects.


Shangri La ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS sometimes spelled without the dash]]) comes from the 1933 novel ''Literature/LostHorizon'' by James Hilton. It is likely a variation on "Shambala" (aka [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Sambhalah, Shamballa, or Xiangbala]]), the South Asian mythical kingdom. Depictions are almost always based on Tibet, with the monkish religion a [[TheThemeParkVersion highly watered-down]] variant of Lamaist Buddhism.

to:

Shangri La ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS sometimes spelled without the dash]]) comes from the 1933 novel ''Literature/LostHorizon'' by James Hilton. It is likely a variation on "Shambala" (aka [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Sambhalah, Shamballa, or Xiangbala]]), the South Asian mythical kingdom. Depictions are almost always based on Tibet, with the monkish religion a [[TheThemeParkVersion highly watered-down]] variant of Lamaist Buddhism.


* In ''VideoGame/IndianaJonesAndTheInfernalMachine'', one of the parts of the titular Infernal Machine is located in Shambala in the Tian Shan mountains on the Kazakh-Chinese border.

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* In ''VideoGame/IndianaJonesAndTheInfernalMachine'', one of the parts of the titular Infernal Machine is located in Shambala in the Tian Shan mountains on the Kazakh-Chinese border.in Kazakhstan.

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* In ''VideoGame/IndianaJonesAndTheInfernalMachine'', one of the parts of the titular Infernal Machine is located in Shambala in the Tian Shan mountains on the Kazakh-Chinese border.


Shangri La ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS sometimes spelled without the dash]]) comes from the 1933 novel ''Literature/LostHorizon'' by James Hilton. It is likely a variation on "Shambala" (aka [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Sambhalah, Shamballa, or Xiangbala]]), the Asian mythical kingdom. Depictions are almost always based on Tibet, with the monkish religion a [[TheThemeParkVersion highly watered-down]] variant of Lamaist Buddhism.

to:

Shangri La ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS sometimes spelled without the dash]]) comes from the 1933 novel ''Literature/LostHorizon'' by James Hilton. It is likely a variation on "Shambala" (aka [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Sambhalah, Shamballa, or Xiangbala]]), the South Asian mythical kingdom. Depictions are almost always based on Tibet, with the monkish religion a [[TheThemeParkVersion highly watered-down]] variant of Lamaist Buddhism.


* Certain regions of ''VideoGame/FarCry4''[='=]s Kyrat, particularly in the ''Valley of the Yetis'' DLC, are a twisted, DarkerAndEdgier take on the trope far from idyllic or utopian. But the mountains and breathtaking vistas, as well as isolated mountain hamlets, certainly qualify. Given how Kyrat is, as typical for ''VideoGame/FarCry'' locales, a CrapsackWorld {{Ruritania}} based on Nepal, but with a few Tibetan influences thrown in, this is not surprising. Interestingly, the game also has a secondary storyline (played through collecting the individual pieces of a thangka that was once on the wall of the protagonist's family homestead) which tells the story of a warrior from a long time ago searching for the ''actual'' Shangri-La.

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* Certain regions of ''VideoGame/FarCry4''[='=]s Kyrat, particularly in the ''Valley of the Yetis'' DLC, are a twisted, DarkerAndEdgier take on the trope far from idyllic or utopian. But the mountains and breathtaking vistas, as well as isolated mountain hamlets, certainly qualify. Given how Kyrat is, as typical for ''VideoGame/FarCry'' locales, a CrapsackWorld {{Ruritania}} {{Qurac}} based on Nepal, but with a few Tibetan influences thrown in, this is not surprising. Interestingly, the game also has a secondary storyline (played through collecting the individual pieces of a thangka that was once on the wall of the protagonist's family homestead) which tells the story of a warrior from a long time ago searching for the ''actual'' Shangri-La.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AMissMallardMystery'': One episode, "Danger in Tibet", had one named Sagahappy, which Miss Mallard stumbled on in her search for Willard.


Hiding place for many a {{Utopia}}. Yet finding it and getting in is usually a lot easier than getting out. Often the destination of an EastwardEndeavor.

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Hiding A hiding place for many a {{Utopia}}. Yet finding it and getting in is usually a lot easier than getting out. Often the destination of an EastwardEndeavor.



* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'': This is where Zeppeli learned Ripple, a SupernaturalMartialArts [[ReviveKillsZombie highly effective against the undead]]. In a major subversion of [[HiddenElfVillage how this trope usually goes]], characters from Shangri-La later appears and have important role in the story. [[spoiler:Including a major villain during Part 2.]]

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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'': This is where Zeppeli learned Ripple, a SupernaturalMartialArts [[ReviveKillsZombie highly effective against the undead]]. In a major subversion of [[HiddenElfVillage how this trope usually goes]], characters from Shangri-La later appears appear and have an important role in the story. [[spoiler:Including a major villain during Part 2.]]



* In Franchise/TheDCU, fighters travel to the city of Nanda Parbat in Tibet, where they learn alongside wise monks. Also there is no death there. Which makes it really suck when a guy dies on the doorstep.

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* In Franchise/TheDCU, fighters travel to the city of Nanda Parbat in Tibet, where they learn alongside wise monks. Also Also, there is no death there. Which makes it really suck when a guy dies on the doorstep.



* Marvel again: Atillan, home city of ''ComicBook/TheInhumans'', is located in the Himalayan mountains. While it isn't entirely this trope, some of the Inhumans (especially Karnak) use MagicalMartialArts.

to:

* Marvel again: Atillan, the home city of ''ComicBook/TheInhumans'', is located in the Himalayan mountains. While it isn't entirely this trope, some of the Inhumans (especially Karnak) use MagicalMartialArts.



* The heroes of ''Film/SkyCaptainAndTheWorldOfTomorrow'' (2004) go to Shangri-La in 1939, probably inspired by the novel ''Lost Horizon'', described below. Given a tragic edge in that the Shangri-La monks take care of a man made sick from radiation poisoning.
* The first film in ''Film/TheLibrarian'' series uses this trope: it has the heroes (and villain) search for and visit Shangri-La in the Himalayas during their quest to find the other two missing parts of TheSpearOfDestiny. It is, given the movie in question, probably not entirely surprising that it is an improbably warm, sunny and idyllic place filled with Buddhist monks and luscious green landscaping, despite literally being surrounded by deadly-cold ice and snow. The monks also have a giant mechanical Budda statue that attacks the bad guy.

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* The heroes of ''Film/SkyCaptainAndTheWorldOfTomorrow'' (2004) go to Shangri-La in 1939, probably inspired by the novel ''Lost Horizon'', described below. Given a tragic edge in that the Shangri-La monks take care of a man made man-made sick from radiation poisoning.
* The first film in ''Film/TheLibrarian'' series uses this trope: it has the heroes (and villain) search for and visit Shangri-La in the Himalayas during their quest to find the other two missing parts of TheSpearOfDestiny. It is, given the movie in question, probably not entirely surprising that it is an improbably warm, sunny and idyllic place filled with Buddhist monks and luscious green landscaping, despite literally being surrounded by deadly-cold ice and snow. The monks also have a giant mechanical Budda Buddha statue that attacks the bad guy.



** At the start of the story, he is the ''abbot'' of the monks. He is tempted by [[{{Satan}} Mr. Nick]], and sets out to the world to prove that creativity and good will can overcome people's base urges.

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** At the start of the story, he is the ''abbot'' of the monks. He is tempted by [[{{Satan}} Mr. Nick]], and sets out to the world to prove that creativity and good will goodwill can overcome people's base urges.



* ''Literature/LaSagaDuPretreJean'' is a French gamebook series with Prester John as the main character, looking for a way to reach Shangri-La and live immortal and happy. In each book he travels through a different country (and sometimes timeline) in order to find information on the city.

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* ''Literature/LaSagaDuPretreJean'' is a French gamebook series with Prester John as the main character, looking for a way to reach Shangri-La and live immortal and happy. In each book book, he travels through a different country (and sometimes timeline) in order to find information on the city.



** The myth of Shamballa goes back centuries, since a bunch of Jesuit priests visited the Buddhist kingdom thought to be Shamballa back in the 17th century and described it as a paradisaical, serene place where no living things were harmed. The king was especially tolerant of the Jesuits and allowed them to build a church there. Unfortunately, a rival [[RealityIsUnrealistic Buddhist kingdom sacked Shamballa]] when they found out the king was letting in Jesuits.

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** The myth of Shamballa goes back centuries, centuries since a bunch of Jesuit priests visited the Buddhist kingdom thought to be Shamballa back in the 17th century and described it as a paradisaical, serene place where no living things were harmed. The king was especially tolerant of the Jesuits and allowed them to build a church there. Unfortunately, a rival [[RealityIsUnrealistic Buddhist kingdom sacked Shamballa]] when they found out the king was letting in Jesuits.



* ''Series/NoReservations'' actually went to one of the Tibetan villages that renamed themselves Shangri-la (see Real Life below), and mentions the portrayal in ''Literature/LostHorizon''. Even if it wasn't really Shangri-La, it's got monks, yaks, snow, mountains and friendly natives, and is quite beautiful in its way.
* The protagonists of ''Series/TheChampions'' have their plane shot down over a Shamgri-La, and the wise and powerful locals heal them and incidentally give them super powers.

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* ''Series/NoReservations'' actually went to one of the Tibetan villages that renamed themselves Shangri-la (see Real Life below), and mentions the portrayal in ''Literature/LostHorizon''. Even if it wasn't really Shangri-La, it's got monks, yaks, snow, mountains mountains, and friendly natives, and is quite beautiful in its way.
* The protagonists of ''Series/TheChampions'' have their plane shot down over a Shamgri-La, and the wise and powerful locals heal them and incidentally give them super powers.superpowers.



* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestXI'' has the very aptly named Angri-La. A temple on top of a snowy mountain inhabited by bald orange robed monks. They have an agreement with Dundrasil to train their princes for a time when they come of age.

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* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestXI'' has the very aptly named Angri-La. A temple on top of a snowy mountain inhabited by bald orange robed orange-robed monks. They have an agreement with Dundrasil to train their princes for a time when they come of age.



* This is one of the major areas in ''VideoGame/TheJourneymanProject 3''. Built into the side of a steep mountain pass, the monastery had advanced mechanisms to protect itself and its secrets from trespassers as well as geothermal tunnels which utilized steam to heat a green house containing several now-extinct plant species. A battle between two alien races caused an avalanche, destroying the monastery.

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* This is one of the major areas in ''VideoGame/TheJourneymanProject 3''. Built into the side of a steep mountain pass, the monastery had advanced mechanisms to protect itself and its secrets from trespassers as well as geothermal tunnels which utilized steam to heat a green house greenhouse containing several now-extinct plant species. A battle between two alien races caused an avalanche, destroying the monastery.



* In ''WesternAnimation/ChillOutScoobyDoo'', during their ice cold adventure, Scooby-Doo and Shaggy discover Shangri-La, which contains crystals that the bad guy wanted.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/ChillOutScoobyDoo'', during their ice cold ice-cold adventure, Scooby-Doo and Shaggy discover Shangri-La, which contains crystals that the bad guy wanted.



* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Animalympics}}'', a canine ski-jump champion gets lost while mountain-climbing, and either finds or hallucinates finding "Dogra-La", an all-doggy version of this trope.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Animalympics}}'', a canine ski-jump champion gets lost while mountain-climbing, mountain-climbing and either finds or hallucinates finding "Dogra-La", an all-doggy version of this trope.



* There are actual cities, towns and regions bearing the name Shangri-La in Tibet, renamed to draw tourists.

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* There are actual cities, towns towns, and regions bearing the name Shangri-La in Tibet, renamed to draw tourists.


** The Cult of the Illuminated invoked this trope for one of their training camps, creating a bucolic, farm-ringed tower protected by arctic mountains. The idea was to test and refine prospective pilgrims' virtue: insufficiently determined seekers will never reach the tower at all.



* Certain regions of ''VideoGame/FarCry4''[='=]s Kyrat, particularly in the ''Valley of the Yetis'' DLC, are a twisted, DarkerAndEdgier take on the trope far from idyllic or utopian. But the mountains and breathtaking vistas, as well as isolated mountain hamlets, certainly qualify. Given how Kyrat is, as typical for ''VideoGame/FarCry'' locales, a CrapsackWorld {{Ruritania}} based on Nepal, but with a few Tibetan influences thrown in, this is not surprising. Interestingly, the game also has a secondary storyline, played through collecting the individual pieces of a thangka that was once on the wall of the protagonist's family homestead, which tells the story of a warrior from a long time ago searching for the ''actual'' Shangri-La.

to:

* Certain regions of ''VideoGame/FarCry4''[='=]s Kyrat, particularly in the ''Valley of the Yetis'' DLC, are a twisted, DarkerAndEdgier take on the trope far from idyllic or utopian. But the mountains and breathtaking vistas, as well as isolated mountain hamlets, certainly qualify. Given how Kyrat is, as typical for ''VideoGame/FarCry'' locales, a CrapsackWorld {{Ruritania}} based on Nepal, but with a few Tibetan influences thrown in, this is not surprising. Interestingly, the game also has a secondary storyline, played storyline (played through collecting the individual pieces of a thangka that was once on the wall of the protagonist's family homestead, homestead) which tells the story of a warrior from a long time ago searching for the ''actual'' Shangri-La.


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* In ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'', Dirge, the Spirit Monks' mountaintop fortress, was this before soldiers destroyed everyone dwelling within. Even in its ruined state, it provides a lot of impressive scenery and plot-relevant information.

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