Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / ThePerfectCrime

Go To



* In ''VideoGame/HeavyRain'', one of the game's hardest trophies to get is called ''Perfect Crime''. [[spoiler: Scott Shelby goes loose, whereas Lauren, Hassan, Kramer, Madison, Norman, Ethan, and Shaun all die. (Though the last two are optional)]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/HeavyRain'', one of the game's hardest trophies to get is called ''Perfect Crime''. [[spoiler: Scott Shelby [[spoiler:Scott Shelby, the [[BigBad Origami Killer]], [[TheBadGuyWins goes loose, loose]], whereas Lauren, Hassan, Kramer, Madison, Norman, Ethan, and Shaun all die. (Though die (though the last two are optional)]]optional).]]



** Second case of the second game. A murder in which only two people are in a locked room that had witnesses standing in front of it. One of those people is murdered and the witnesses break into the room seconds later to find one of the people dead and the other wielding a pistol. [[spoiler:the plan only failed because the victim, unbeknownst to Mini, had a gun with him and shot back in self-defense. This created the crucial piece of evidence which let Phoenix prove that someone else WAS in the room at the time of the killing.]]
** The UR-1 incident. The true culprit tries to hide the evidence that he was at the crime scene [[spoiler:by blowing it up IN SPACE. While blowing up the evidence failed, it was still in an interplanetary probe for seven years. When it comes back down to Earth, he kills the person unwittingly carrying it so it's used as evidence during the trial for his murder. ''And then he blows up the courtroom''. The Phantom also frames Simon and later Athena. The only reason his attempts to hide the evidence failed was that Athena's mother gave her an earring made out of the same moon rock, which could be used to show that the debris with his blood on it was from the crime scene.]]

to:

** Second case of the second game. A murder in which only two people are in a locked room that had witnesses standing in front of it. One of those people is murdered and the witnesses break into the room seconds later to find one of the people dead and the other wielding a pistol. [[spoiler:the [[spoiler:The plan only failed because the victim, unbeknownst to Mini, had a gun with him and shot back in self-defense. This created the crucial piece of evidence which let Phoenix prove that someone else WAS in the room at the time of the killing.]]
** The UR-1 incident. The true culprit tries to hide the evidence that he was they were at the crime scene [[spoiler:by blowing by [[spoiler:blowing it up IN SPACE. While blowing up the evidence failed, it was still in an interplanetary probe for seven years. In the meantime. The Phantom kills and impersonates Detective Bobby Fulbright so that he can interfere in the investigation. When it the evidence comes back down to Earth, he kills the person unwittingly carrying it so it's used as evidence during the trial for his murder. ''And then he blows up the courtroom''. The Phantom also frames Simon and later Athena. The only reason his attempts to hide the evidence failed was that Athena's mother gave her an earring made out of the same moon rock, which could be used to show that the debris with his blood on it was from the crime scene.]]



* [[spoiler:Nagito Komaeda]] from ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa 2}}'' occasionally brags that he would be able to plan the perfect murder, and occasionally offers to let someone kill him with his plan... He's not exactly sane. And in chapter 5, he delivers on his plan. Details as follows: [[spoiler:He shuts himself in a building and ties himself up in a way that still allows for a little movement. He also stabs himself multiple times and sets up a spear hanging from the roof that will impale him if he lets go of the rope he's holding. Then he sets the building on fire. He had arranged events such that everyone would see the building burst into flames, break in, and immediately rush to find fire extinguishing grenades. Everyone tossed the grenades onto the flame... and here's the masterstroke: ''Nagito poisoned one of the grenades.'' The poison would kill Nagito and dissipate before harming anyone else, his savagely injured and now spear-impaled body shows injuries only he was in a position to inflict (suggesting suicide), but the one who killed him is the one who threw the poisoned grenade. There is no way of telling who that was.]] The evidence that found the killer is best described as a "hunch". [[spoiler: His actual goal was to have [[ReverseMole the traitor]] kill him, so she could escape because no one could potentially solve it. Hajime realized that.]]
** In ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa V3}}, [[spoiler: [[TheChessmaster Kokichi]] [[{{Troll}} Oma]] collaborates with Kaito Momota to create a murder that even Monokuma can't figure out, and would therefore ruin the killing game: Kokichi locks himself in a room with Kaito and allows the latter to push him under the hydraulic press while he wears his coat. Then, Kaito shuts himself inside an [[HumongousMecha Exisal]], pretending to be Kokichi by reading a book Kokichi gave him. If it wasn't for Shuichi's reasoning, Kaito dying of moon illness, and Kokichi forgetting which sleeve of his jacket Kaito left empty, the crime might have been never solved at all.]]

to:

* [[spoiler:Nagito Komaeda]] from ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa 2}}'' occasionally brags that he would be able to plan the perfect murder, and occasionally offers to let someone kill him with his plan... He's not exactly sane. And in chapter 5, he delivers on his plan. Details as follows: [[spoiler:He shuts himself in a building and ties himself up in a way that still allows for a little movement. He also stabs himself multiple times and sets up a spear hanging from the roof that will impale him if he lets go of the rope he's holding. Then he sets the building on fire. He had arranged events such that everyone would see the building burst into flames, break in, and immediately rush to find fire extinguishing grenades. Everyone tossed the grenades onto the flame... and here's the masterstroke: ''Nagito poisoned one of the grenades.'' The poison would kill Nagito and dissipate before harming anyone else, his savagely injured and now spear-impaled body shows injuries only he was in a position to inflict (suggesting suicide), but the one who killed him is the one who threw the poisoned grenade. There is no way of telling who that was.]] The evidence that found the killer is best described as a "hunch". [[spoiler: His actual goal was to have [[ReverseMole the traitor]] kill him, so she could escape because no one could potentially solve it. Hajime realized that.that, and is [[ShootTheDog forced to sacrifice]] [[LoveInterest Chiaki]] so the others can all surivive.]]
** In ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa V3}}, V3}}'', [[spoiler: [[TheChessmaster Kokichi]] [[{{Troll}} Oma]] collaborates with Kaito Momota to create a murder that even Monokuma can't figure out, and would therefore ruin the killing game: Kokichi locks himself in a room with Kaito and allows the latter to push him under the hydraulic press while he wears his coat. Then, Kaito shuts himself inside an [[HumongousMecha Exisal]], pretending to be Kokichi by reading a book Kokichi gave him. If it wasn't for Shuichi's reasoning, Kaito dying of moon illness, and Kokichi forgetting which sleeve of his jacket Kaito left empty, the crime might have been never solved at all.]]


->''"There is no one in the world who can be somewhere and leave without a trace. Any man who could isn't human."''

to:

->''"There is no one no-one in the world who can be somewhere and leave without a trace. Any man who could isn't human."''



* {{Lampshaded}} in ''WebVideo/DeathNoteTheAbridgedSeriesKpts4tv'':
-->'''Light:''' Well would you look at that, Kira just killed all those people while I just sat here doing nothing. Ha! Weird, huh? Well, I guess L was wrong about me being Kira, isn't that right guys?



* According to ''TheMunchkinsGuideToPowerGaming'', for {{Munchkin}}s, the Perfect Crime is ''not'' one that is pulled off with no evidence or witnesses, which you can live the rest of your life off the proceeds of, but rather "one which involves plenty of gun battles, hopefully a car chase, and some hostage-taking. One that provides enough money to get more and better guns for the next job and to pay off the extravagant drug habit they've taken among their flaws. Their perfect crime has no witnesses because they've killed them all."

to:

* According to ''TheMunchkinsGuideToPowerGaming'', ''Literature/TheMunchkinsGuideToPowerGaming'', for {{Munchkin}}s, the Perfect Crime is ''not'' one that is pulled off with no evidence or witnesses, which you can live the rest of your life off the proceeds of, but rather "one which involves plenty of gun battles, hopefully a car chase, and some hostage-taking. One that provides enough money to get more and better guns for the next job and to pay off the extravagant drug habit they've taken among their flaws. Their perfect crime has no witnesses because they've killed them all."



* [[Webcomic/{{Freefall}} Sam Starfall]] conceives of a crime so sneaky, [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff800/fv00739.htm even HE'S not sure he's committing it!]]

to:

* [[Webcomic/{{Freefall}} ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'': Sam Starfall]] Starfall conceives of a crime so sneaky, [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff800/fv00739.htm even HE'S not sure he's committing it!]]



[[folder:Web Original]]
* {{Lampshaded}} in ''WebVideo/DeathNoteTheAbridgedSeriesKpts4tv'':
-->'''Light:''' Well would you look at that, Kira just killed all those people while I just sat here doing nothing. Ha! Weird, huh? Well, I guess L was wrong about me being Kira, isn't that right guys?
[[/folder]]



* In one of the shorts that ''TheSimpsons'' originated from, Bart claims that stealing freshly baked cookies and blaming it on Maggie, who is pre-verbal and can't defend herself, is the perfect crime. After eating an entire sheet of cookies, getting chocolate smeared all over his face, he is caught and his attempt to scapegoat his sister understandably fail. As Bart gets taken away for punishment (stating that there is no such thing as a perfect crime), Maggie steals ''one'' cookie -- whose theft will be blamed on Bart if it's noticed at all.

to:

* In one of the shorts that ''TheSimpsons'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' originated from, Bart claims that stealing freshly baked cookies and blaming it on Maggie, who is pre-verbal and can't defend herself, is the perfect crime. After eating an entire sheet of cookies, getting chocolate smeared all over his face, he is caught and his attempt to scapegoat his sister understandably fail. As Bart gets taken away for punishment (stating that there is no such thing as a perfect crime), Maggie steals ''one'' cookie -- whose theft will be blamed on Bart if it's noticed at all.


Alternatively, he might be brazen about his crime, but will have found a loophole in the law to get away with it.

Of course, he rarely will, for one reason or another. Maybe he isn't [[TooCleverByHalf so smart as he thinks he is]]. Maybe his [[MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter daughter]] feels guilty. Maybe he slips up in some small way. But [[AnAesop Aesop]] aside, [[MagnificentBastard you almost want to see him get away with it]]. Another major flipside of a Perfect Crime, and the bane of all would-be (and some actual, as shown in examples) perpetrators is that if the criminal is never identified, [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold they cannot become famous for it]].

to:

Alternatively, he might be brazen about his crime, crime but will have found a loophole in the law to get away with it.

Of course, he rarely will, for one reason or another. Maybe he isn't [[TooCleverByHalf so smart as he thinks he is]]. Maybe his [[MadScientistsBeautifulDaughter daughter]] feels guilty. Maybe he slips up in some small way. But [[AnAesop Aesop]] aside, [[MagnificentBastard you almost want to see him get away with it]]. Another major flipside of a Perfect Crime, Crime and the bane of all would-be (and some actual, as shown in examples) perpetrators is that if the criminal is never identified, [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold they cannot become famous for it]].



* A number of murderers in ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' intentionally arrange to have "{{Meitantei}}" Mouri Kogoro witness their crime, so confident are they that they can have the "Great Detective" himself provide them with a foolproof alibi. (And usually they would be right, too, even with Conan on the job, save for some completely coincidental bit of bad luck that provides the crucial evidence necessary to link them to it.)

to:

* A number of murderers in ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' intentionally arrange to have "{{Meitantei}}" Mouri Kogoro witness their crime, so confident are they that they can have the "Great Detective" himself provide them with a foolproof alibi. (And usually usually, they would be right, right too, even with Conan on the job, save for some completely coincidental bit of bad luck that provides the crucial evidence necessary to link them to it.)



One of the main examples of this happens in "Turnabout Gallows". A murder occurs on an estate (where the victim was "struck with lethal force") and everyone but the defendant has an completely, 100% airtight alibi for the moment of the murder that even Phoenix himself can confirm, seeing as how he was there at the time. AKA; There was no one who was away from Phoenix's line of sight during the time of the victim's death apart from the defendant. [[spoiler:The real killer actually set up a "timed murder"...and was able to kill the victim without actually having to be anywhere near him at the time, or without having to instate the killing blow. In reality, he set up a complex murder plot that made it so that, when the main breaker was shut off and the electricity went out, it would kill the victim.]]

to:

One of the main examples of this happens in "Turnabout Gallows". A murder occurs on an estate (where the victim was "struck with lethal force") and everyone but the defendant has an a completely, 100% airtight alibi for the moment of the murder that even Phoenix himself can confirm, seeing as how he was there at the time. AKA; There was no one who was away from Phoenix's line of sight during the time of the victim's death apart from the defendant. [[spoiler:The real killer actually set up a "timed murder"...and was able to kill the victim without actually having to be anywhere near him at the time, or without having to instate the killing blow. In reality, he set up a complex murder plot that made it so that, when the main breaker was shut off and the electricity went out, it would kill the victim.]]



* ''Manga/{{Kurokochi}}'' involves the famous 300 million yen robbery case, during which the eponymous sum of money was stolen by an unknown young man in a police uniform. In real life it has yet to be solved, but in the manga, Kurokochi and Seike discover that the culprit [[spoiler:Hideto Kiritani was rapidly caught by the Public Security Investigation Agency. However, they kept silent about it because Kiritani was the son of a police commissionner, threatening to cause a scandal that would destroy the organization. Moreover, the Agency also wanted to keep the money to themselves]].

to:

* ''Manga/{{Kurokochi}}'' involves the famous 300 million yen robbery case, during which the eponymous sum of money was stolen by an unknown young man in a police uniform. In real life life, it has yet to be solved, but in the manga, Kurokochi and Seike discover that the culprit [[spoiler:Hideto Kiritani was rapidly caught by the Public Security Investigation Agency. However, they kept silent about it because Kiritani was the son of a police commissionner, commissioner, threatening to cause a scandal that would destroy the organization. Moreover, the Agency also wanted to keep the money to themselves]].



* In ''X-Men Noir'', [[spoiler:Jean Grey kills Anne-Marie Rankin with WolverineClaws to frame her old pal Captain Logan. She then cuts up all distinguishing facial features and dyes both her and the body's hair, assuming Rankin's identity. The police decide to not investigate the murder when they see an X-Man tattoo on the body, thinking it's not worth taxpayer money to figure out which of "Jean"'s gangland boyfriends got tired of her first. This leaves Jean to wait out the years until "Rankin" turns 21 so she can collect on her trust fund. Oh, and one last thing; Rankin had the unique talent to absorb the personality traits of whomever was around her at the time. Meaning Jean was now impersonating someone with no fixed personality; she's just ''that'' good an actress. Robert Halloway figures it for the perfect crime... at least, until he and his brother got involved and screwed it all up for her. One detail of such is that the body has apparently shrunk since it died, exposing the roots of its hair. That, or the cops didn't look closely at the body.]]

to:

* In ''X-Men Noir'', [[spoiler:Jean Grey kills Anne-Marie Rankin with WolverineClaws to frame her old pal Captain Logan. She then cuts up all distinguishing facial features and dyes both her and the body's hair, assuming Rankin's identity. The police decide to not investigate the murder when they see an X-Man tattoo on the body, thinking it's not worth taxpayer money to figure out which of "Jean"'s gangland boyfriends got tired of her first. This leaves Jean to wait out the years until "Rankin" turns 21 so she can collect on her trust fund. Oh, and one last thing; Rankin had the unique talent to absorb the personality traits of whomever whoever was around her at the time. Meaning Jean was now impersonating someone with no fixed personality; she's just ''that'' good an actress. Robert Halloway figures it for the perfect crime... at least, least until he and his brother got involved and screwed it all up for her. One detail of such is that the body has apparently shrunk since it died, exposing the roots of its hair. That, or the cops didn't look closely at the body.]]



* Creator/AlfredHitchcock loved these:
** ''Film/StrangersOnATrain'': Two men trade murders so that the police cannot determine a motive. Recycled so many times that [[StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder it's a crime trope]].
** ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'': [[spoiler: James Stewart's character is fooled into thinking the wife of his friend is possessed by a ghost and driven to suicide, when in fact it is a look-alike (he'd never met her, so he only assumed this was the true identity of the woman), and her 'suicide' was faked by dumping the real wife's already-dead body off the tower of a mission. They nearly get away with it, though he finds the girl again and falls in love with her...only to realize that it is the same woman he knew.]]
** ''Film/{{Rope}}'', based on the story of Leopold and Loeb, below.



* ''Film/StrangersOnATrain'': Two men trade murders, so that the police cannot determine a motive. Recycled so many times that [[StrangersOnATrainPlotMurder it's a crime trope]].



* ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'': [[spoiler: James Stewart's character is fooled into thinking the wife of his friend is possessed by a ghost and driven to suicide, when in fact it is a look-alike (he'd never met her, so he only assumed this was the true identity of the woman), and her 'suicide' was faked by dumping the real wife's already-dead body off the tower of a mission. They nearly get away with it, though he finds the girl again and falls in love with her...only to realize that it is the same woman he knew.]]



* ''[[Film/{{Fracture 2007}} Fracture]]'': Getting away with murder. Almost. [[spoiler:The reason the bad guy doesn't get away is because he makes the mistake of having his comatose wife taken off life support. When new evidence comes to light, he assumes that double jeopardy will make it impossible to re-try him, only for the prosecutor to point out that, since his wife was alive during the original trial, he was technically being accused of ''attempted'' murder. She's dead now, so he can be accused of murder without violating the double jeopardy rule]].
* ''Film/{{Rope}}'', another Creator/AlfredHitchcock film, based on the story of Leopold and Loeb, below.

to:

* ''[[Film/{{Fracture 2007}} Fracture]]'': Getting away with murder. Almost. [[spoiler:The reason the bad guy doesn't get away is because that he makes the mistake of having his comatose wife taken off life support. When new evidence comes to light, he assumes that double jeopardy will make it impossible to re-try him, only for the prosecutor to point out that, since his wife was alive during the original trial, he was technically being accused of ''attempted'' murder. She's dead now, so he can be accused of murder without violating the double jeopardy rule]].
* ''Film/{{Rope}}'', another Creator/AlfredHitchcock film, based on the story of Leopold and Loeb, below.
rule]].



* ''Film/{{Rampage|2009}}'' how to pull of the ultimate murder spree/robbery in small town hell.
* ''The Perfect Crime'' is a Spanish film about a meticulous mall employee who tries to off his AbhorrentAdmirer with the perfect crime. He rents a bunch of crime films as research and is alarmed that one of them is mis-labeled ''El Crimen Ferpecto'', "The Ferpect Crime." This was the original Spanish title of the film.

to:

* ''Film/{{Rampage|2009}}'' how to pull of the ultimate murder spree/robbery in small town small-town hell.
* ''The Perfect Crime'' is a Spanish film about a meticulous mall employee who tries to off his AbhorrentAdmirer with the perfect crime. He rents a bunch of crime films as research and is alarmed that one of them is mis-labeled mislabeled ''El Crimen Ferpecto'', "The Ferpect Crime." This was the original Spanish title of the film.



* Creator/AgathaChristie's
** In ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'', the killer uses a very convoluted method and an obvious one for which he has an unbreakable alibi. He intended to be tried for the obvious method and produce his alibi, because the British law prevents you from being tried twice for the same murder. Unfortunately, he blabbed too much and Poirot saw through his ruse.

to:

* Creator/AgathaChristie's
Creator/AgathaChristie:
** In ''Literature/TheMysteriousAffairAtStyles'', the killer uses a very convoluted method and an obvious one for which he has an unbreakable alibi. He intended to be tried for the obvious method and produce his alibi, alibi because the British law prevents you from being tried twice for the same murder. Unfortunately, he blabbed too much and Poirot saw through his ruse.



* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'': Professor Moriarty is especially good at doing this. Made all the more intriguing because it's implied that he and Holmes have history before The Final Problem, and several fans have decided to start looking for the other cases he's been the cause of. And the police wouldn't believe he was a criminal.

to:

* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'': Professor Moriarty is especially good at doing this. Made all the more intriguing because it's implied that he and Holmes have a history before The Final Problem, and several fans have decided to start looking for the other cases he's been the cause of. And the police wouldn't believe he was a criminal.



* This is a staple of ''Series/{{Columbo}}''. Episodes start off with the viewer already seeing the murderer commit a perfect crime that usually obscures any evidence or diverts any attention to themselves as a suspect. Or, at least, that's what they think, until a crusty old detective comes knocking at the door with just a few more questions.... Note that some of the crimes ''are'', indeed, perfect enough that Columbo just cannot gather enough evidence for a trial, despite being quite sure of who's done it. That generally means the Lieutenant will instead spring a trap, either by manipulating the culprit into another crime to hide some new fake "evidence", or to put him or her in a position where confessing becomes the preferred option (when the alternative is, for example, mob justice).

to:

* This is a staple of ''Series/{{Columbo}}''. Episodes start off with the viewer already seeing the murderer commit a perfect crime that usually obscures any evidence or diverts any attention to themselves as a suspect. Or, at least, that's what they think, until a crusty old detective comes knocking at the door with just a few more questions....questions... Note that some of the crimes ''are'', indeed, perfect enough that Columbo just cannot gather enough evidence for a trial, despite being quite sure of who's done it. That generally means the Lieutenant will instead spring a trap, either by manipulating the culprit into another crime to hide some new fake "evidence", or to put him or her in a position where confessing becomes the preferred option (when the alternative is, for example, mob justice).



* Also pops up in ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', after the detectives find a twin brother and sister, who turn out to be both biologically male. It seems that there was a problem with "her" circumcision as an infant, so instead of living as a castrated male the parents decided to give him a sex change and female hormone supplements so that "she" could live a normal life as a woman. However, "she" has been having gender confusion and identity issues anyway, and when the detectives tell the "girl" the truth she starts to identify as male, and stops taking estrogen. Then the twins' therapist, who recommended the procedure to the parents, is murdered. There is DNA left at the scene (The perpetrator took the time to ''spit'' on the corpse), but the twins have identical DNA, and the "girl" has been off estrogen just long enough for it to get out of "her" system. Any prosecution against one twin would automatically be invalidated by the fact that the other twin could have done it. TruthInTelevision. Twins are the nightmare of forensics. And the twins in the episode are based on a pair of real-life twins at that (though the real guys didn't kill anybody, of course).

to:

* Also pops up in ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'', after the detectives find a twin brother and sister, who turn turns out to be both biologically male. It seems that there was a problem with "her" circumcision as an infant, so instead of living as a castrated male male, the parents decided to give him a sex change and female hormone supplements so that "she" could live a normal life as a woman. However, "she" has been having gender confusion and identity issues anyway, and when the detectives tell the "girl" the truth she starts to identify as male, male and stops taking estrogen. Then the twins' therapist, who recommended the procedure to the parents, is murdered. There is DNA left at the scene (The perpetrator took the time to ''spit'' on the corpse), but the twins have identical DNA, and the "girl" has been off estrogen just long enough for it to get out of "her" system. Any prosecution against one twin would automatically be invalidated by the fact that the other twin could have done it. TruthInTelevision. Twins are the nightmare of forensics. And the twins in the episode are based on a pair of real-life twins at that (though the real guys didn't kill anybody, of course).



* ''Series/{{Banacek}}'', starring George Peppard, was about a freelance insurance investigator who specialized in impossible thefts. For example, one episode involved the theft of a 1970's room-sized super computer.

to:

* ''Series/{{Banacek}}'', starring George Peppard, was about a freelance insurance investigator who specialized in impossible thefts. For example, one episode involved the theft of a 1970's 1970s room-sized super computer.supercomputer.



* Many episodes of ''Series/{{Monk}}'' have the killer construct a seemingly perfect alibi for themselves, only for Monk to gradually unravel it. Several killers appear to have perfect alibis (one was in a coma during the murder, another one was in space, and a third guy was on TV running a marathon). [[spoiler:The coma guy glued packages with bombs to the top of the mailbox to drop some time later before ending up in a coma (he was only planning to get arrested). The astronaut knocked out his ex and tied her around the neck to a garage door opener, having the clicker mailed during his mission. The runner attached his tracker to the camera, then slipped out to kill his ex, returning just before crossing the finish line]].

to:

* Many episodes of ''Series/{{Monk}}'' have the killer construct a seemingly perfect alibi for themselves, only for Monk to gradually unravel it. Several killers appear to have perfect alibis (one was in a coma during the murder, another one was in space, and a third guy was on TV running a marathon). [[spoiler:The coma guy glued packages with bombs to the top of the mailbox to drop some time sometime later before ending up in a coma (he was only planning to get arrested). The astronaut knocked out his ex and tied her around the neck to a garage door opener, having the clicker mailed during his mission. The runner attached his tracker to the camera, then slipped out to kill his ex, returning just before crossing the finish line]].



* In the ''Series/{{Moonlighting}}'' episode "Perfetc" [sic] Dave and Maddie are hired by a man who committed the perfect crime, and is now dying. He wants them to prove that he did it so he'll be remembered for the accomplishment.
* The eponymous character from ''Series/{{Dexter}}'' is quite proficient at this: tranquilizing his victims and binding them in a room completely covered in plastic sheeting. He then kills them with an edged weapon to avoid ballistic evidence, often while wearing a face shield, rubber gloves and apron, and saws them into pieces which he [[DisposingOfABody disposes of]] in biodegradable trash bags and dumps into a strong ocean current. The victims then all appear to be missing persons cases and are rarely ever mentioned again. It helps that he's a blood spatter analyst; it's his job to figure out other people's crimes, and he got training in the matter from his cop foster father.

to:

* In the ''Series/{{Moonlighting}}'' episode "Perfetc" [sic] Dave and Maddie are hired by a man who committed the perfect crime, crime and is now dying. He wants them to prove that he did it so he'll be remembered for the accomplishment.
* The eponymous character from ''Series/{{Dexter}}'' is quite proficient at this: tranquilizing his victims and binding them in a room completely covered in plastic sheeting. He then kills them with an edged weapon to avoid ballistic evidence, often while wearing a face shield, rubber gloves gloves, and an apron, and saws them into pieces which he [[DisposingOfABody disposes of]] in biodegradable trash bags and dumps into a strong ocean current. The victims then all appear to be missing persons cases and are rarely ever mentioned again. It helps that he's a blood spatter blood-spatter analyst; it's his job to figure out other people's crimes, and he got training in the matter from his cop foster father.



* The ''Series/TwoTwisted'' episode "Finding Frank" has a security guard's colleague disappearing and calling out desperately over his walkie-talkie. When the guard goes to find him it turns out to be a [[ScarySurpriseParty surprise retirement party]] but goes terribly wrong when the nervous guard overreacts, firing his gun when the lights come on, killing his wife. [[spoiler:But as the guard is being led away, he drops a bit of paper that his colleague picks up. It's an invitation to the party with the exact time, location and everything, showing that the guard knew all along and used the party to kill his wife, framing it as accident. It's even better when you know the actor who plays the guard played a put-upon ExtremeDoormat in his most famous role.]]

to:

* The ''Series/TwoTwisted'' episode "Finding Frank" has a security guard's colleague disappearing and calling out desperately over his walkie-talkie. When the guard goes to find him it turns out to be a [[ScarySurpriseParty surprise retirement party]] but goes terribly wrong when the nervous guard overreacts, firing his gun when the lights come on, killing his wife. [[spoiler:But as the guard is being led away, he drops a bit of paper that his colleague picks up. It's an invitation to the party with the exact time, location and everything, showing that the guard knew all along and used the party to kill his wife, framing it as an accident. It's even better when you know the actor who plays the guard played a put-upon ExtremeDoormat in his most famous role.]]



* An episode of ''Series/DiagnosisMurder'' had the first half of the episode as the criminal explaining his plan for the perfect murder followed by the actual murder where nothing went to plan. Despite this, the reason Sloan caught onto him wasn't because of the numerous mistakes but because of the "mountain of evidence" he planted to frame someone else. It was the first case Sloan had where the suspect was so obvious that he thought it was suspicious.

to:

* An episode of ''Series/DiagnosisMurder'' had the first half of the episode as the criminal explaining his plan for the perfect murder followed by the actual murder where nothing went to plan. Despite this, the reason Sloan caught onto him wasn't because of the numerous mistakes but because of the "mountain of evidence" he had planted to frame someone else. It was the first case Sloan had where the suspect was so obvious that he thought it was suspicious.



* Averted in ''Series/{{Bones}}''. Finn Abernathy is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.

to:

* Averted in ''Series/{{Bones}}''. Finn Abernathy is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, father and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.



* ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'': This is a common SelfImposedChallenge for the players known as the "Ghost Run": rob the place blind, but leave ''no trace'' that you were there. Don't knock anyone out. Re-lock all the doors, safes, and other unlockable things. Don't break anything. Don't let anyone get even the slightest hint that there's a thief about. It's possible, but extremely difficult.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'': This is a common SelfImposedChallenge for the players known as the "Ghost Run": rob the place blind, but leave ''no trace'' that you were there. Don't knock anyone out. Re-lock all the doors, safes, and other unlockable things. Don't break anything. Don't let anyone get even the slightest hint that there's a thief about. It's possible, possible but extremely difficult.



** Second case of the third game. [[spoiler:Luke Atmey's plan to murder Kane Bullard used the Double Jeopardy law to get him convicted for being [[PhantomThief Mask*DeMasque]], because since the theft and murder occurred at the same time, being declared guilty of one legally makes him innocent of the other.]]

to:

** Second case of the third game. [[spoiler:Luke Atmey's plan to murder Kane Bullard used the Double Jeopardy law to get him convicted for being [[PhantomThief Mask*DeMasque]], Mask*DeMasque]] because since the theft and murder occurred at the same time, being declared guilty of one legally makes him innocent of the other.]]



** Second case of the second game. A murder in which only two people are in a locked room that had witnesses standing in front of it. One of those people is murdered and the witnesses break into the room seconds later to find one of the people dead and the other wielding a pistol. [[spoiler:the plan only failed because the victim, unbeknownst to Mini, had a gun with him and shot back in self defense. This created the crucial piece of evidence which let Phoenix prove that someone else WAS in the room at the time of the killing.]]
** The UR-1 incident. The true culprit tries to hide the evidence that he was at the crime scene [[spoiler:by blowing it up IN SPACE. While blowing up the evidence failed, it was still in an interplanetary probe for seven years. When it comes back down to Earth, he kills the person unwittingly carrying it so it's used as evidence during the trial for his murder. ''And then he blows up the courtroom''. The Phantom also frames Simon and later Athena. The only reason his attempts to hide the evidence failed was because Athena's mother gave her an earring made out of the same moon rock, which could be used to show that the debris with his blood on it was from the crime scene.]]
** Manov Mistree's murder in ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice''. [[spoiler:Even with Apollo's efforts, Mr. Reus would've gone scot free because he had destroyed the evidence implicating him of having committed ''remote'' murder.]] They were only brought down because [[spoiler:Bonny De Famme]] [[SpannerInTheWorks made a mistake]] during the murder that forced the perp to manipulate evidence in a completely nonsensical way that discredits the claim that Trucy Wright did it.

to:

** Second case of the second game. A murder in which only two people are in a locked room that had witnesses standing in front of it. One of those people is murdered and the witnesses break into the room seconds later to find one of the people dead and the other wielding a pistol. [[spoiler:the plan only failed because the victim, unbeknownst to Mini, had a gun with him and shot back in self defense.self-defense. This created the crucial piece of evidence which let Phoenix prove that someone else WAS in the room at the time of the killing.]]
** The UR-1 incident. The true culprit tries to hide the evidence that he was at the crime scene [[spoiler:by blowing it up IN SPACE. While blowing up the evidence failed, it was still in an interplanetary probe for seven years. When it comes back down to Earth, he kills the person unwittingly carrying it so it's used as evidence during the trial for his murder. ''And then he blows up the courtroom''. The Phantom also frames Simon and later Athena. The only reason his attempts to hide the evidence failed was because that Athena's mother gave her an earring made out of the same moon rock, which could be used to show that the debris with his blood on it was from the crime scene.]]
** Manov Mistree's murder in ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice''. [[spoiler:Even with Apollo's efforts, Mr. Reus would've gone scot free scot-free because he had destroyed the evidence implicating him of having committed ''remote'' murder.]] They were only brought down because [[spoiler:Bonny De Famme]] [[SpannerInTheWorks made a mistake]] during the murder that forced the perp to manipulate the evidence in a completely nonsensical way that discredits the claim that Trucy Wright did it.



-->'''Light:''' Well would you look at that, Kira just killed all those people while I just sat here doing nothing. Ha! Weird, huh? Well I guess L was wrong about me being Kira, isn't that right guys?

to:

-->'''Light:''' Well would you look at that, Kira just killed all those people while I just sat here doing nothing. Ha! Weird, huh? Well Well, I guess L was wrong about me being Kira, isn't that right guys?



*** Both the Zodiac and Ripper cases have suspects, some of them very solid, but due to not enough evidence - and in the Ripper case, a severe case of JurisdictionFriction - none of the suspects could be charged.

to:

*** Both the Zodiac and Ripper cases have had suspects, some of them very solid, but due to not enough a lack of evidence - and in the Ripper case, a severe case of JurisdictionFriction - none of the suspects could be charged.



* The TV show ''Masterminds'' re-enacts real life cases, some of which might be considered the perfect crime. One episode was even titled "The Perfect Score" and had an FBI agent admitting that the crime was perfect. There were only a few clues that went straight to dead ends. The only reason the criminal was caught was that he tried to pull it off again, and the FBI noticed how similar the second (failed) crime was.

to:

* The TV show ''Masterminds'' re-enacts real life real-life cases, some of which might be considered the perfect crime. One episode was even titled "The Perfect Score" and had an FBI agent admitting that the crime was perfect. There were only a few clues that went straight to dead ends. The only reason the criminal was caught was that he tried to pull it off again, and the FBI noticed how similar the second (failed) crime was.



* There's actually a very popular argument that the perfect crime is one where nobody ever realizes a crime was committed. Take murder for example. If everyone (police, M.E., relatives, everyone) believe the victim died of natural causes, or in a tragic accident, then there is no murder to be investigated. The perfect crime. Thus, by definition we will never know if the perfect crime has been committed because we never know that it occurred in the first place. To put in perspective, there were 126,438 deaths in 2010 in the USA that were the result of accidental injury. If 1% of them were murders that were never recognized, that would be 1264 murders that were never identified as such, or an 8.5% increase in the listed number of murders for that year.
* Laws that are struck down by courts remain on the books, because legislators generally don't bother repealing them, so in a sense breaking them is the perfect crime. The law is unenforceable, so if caught you can never be convicted.

to:

* There's actually a very popular argument that the perfect crime is one where nobody ever realizes a crime was committed. Take murder for example. If everyone (police, M.E., relatives, everyone) believe the victim died of natural causes, or in a tragic accident, then there is no murder to be investigated. The perfect crime. Thus, by definition definition, we will never know if the perfect crime has been committed because we never know that it occurred in the first place. To put in perspective, there were 126,438 deaths in 2010 in the USA that were the result of accidental injury. If 1% of them were murders that were never recognized, that would be 1264 murders that were never identified as such, such or an 8.5% increase in the listed number of murders for that year.
* Laws that are struck down by courts remain on the books, books because legislators generally don't bother repealing them, so in a sense breaking them is the perfect crime. The law is unenforceable, so if caught you can never be convicted.



* It's been speculated that the small section of Yellowstone National Park that lies in the state of Idaho[[note]]Most of the park is in Wyoming, with some in Montana.[[/note]] might be the perfect place to commit a murder. The theory is that it will be impossible to empanel a qualified jury because there are no persons who reside within both the State of Idaho and the judicial district that contains the park. Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicinage_Clause#The_perfect_crime.3F details]]. Even beyond that, the area is a wilderness -- there are no paved roads in that part of the park -- meaning that people don't go there very often, making it less likely the body would be found. JurisdictionFriction is also quite possible.

to:

* It's been speculated that the small section of Yellowstone National Park that lies in the state of Idaho[[note]]Most of the park is in Wyoming, with some in Montana.[[/note]] might be the perfect place to commit a murder. The theory is that it will be impossible to empanel impanel a qualified jury because there are no persons who reside within both the State of Idaho and the judicial district that contains the park. Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicinage_Clause#The_perfect_crime.3F details]]. Even beyond that, the area is a wilderness -- there are no paved roads in that part of the park -- meaning that people don't go there very often, making it less likely the body would be found. JurisdictionFriction is also quite possible.

Added DiffLines:

* Music/Apollo440 made an instrumental track titled "The Perfect Crime" for their album ''Gettin' High On Your Own Supply''.


* It's been speculated that the small section of Yellowstone National Park that lies in the state of Idaho[[note]]Most of the park is in Wyoming, with some in Montana.[[/note]] might be the perfect place to commit a murder. The theory is that it will be impossible to empanel a qualified jury because there are no persons who reside within both the State of Idaho and the judicial district that contains the park. Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicinage_Clause#The_perfect_crime.3F details]]. Even beyond that, the area is a wilderness -- there are no paved roads in that part of the park. JurisdictionFriction is also quite possible.

to:

* It's been speculated that the small section of Yellowstone National Park that lies in the state of Idaho[[note]]Most of the park is in Wyoming, with some in Montana.[[/note]] might be the perfect place to commit a murder. The theory is that it will be impossible to empanel a qualified jury because there are no persons who reside within both the State of Idaho and the judicial district that contains the park. Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicinage_Clause#The_perfect_crime.3F details]]. Even beyond that, the area is a wilderness -- there are no paved roads in that part of the park.park -- meaning that people don't go there very often, making it less likely the body would be found. JurisdictionFriction is also quite possible.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Manga/{{Kurokochi}}'' involves the famous 300 million yen robbery case, during which the eponymous sum of money was stolen by an unknown young man in a police uniform. In real life it has yet to be solved, but in the manga, Kurokochi and Seike discover that the culprit [[spoiler:Hideto Kiritani was rapidly caught by the Public Security Investigation Agency. However, they kept silent about it because Kiritani was the son of a police commissionner, threatening to cause a scandal that would destroy the organization. Moreover, the Agency also wanted to keep the money to themselves]].


* [[spoiler:Nagito Komaeda]] from ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa 2}}'' occasionally brags that he would be able to plan the perfect murder, and occasionally offers to let someone kill him with his plan... He's not exactly sane. And in chapter 5, he delivers on his plan. Details as follows: [[spoiler:He shuts himself in a building and ties himself up in a way that still allows for a little movement. He also stabs himself multiple times and sets up a spear hanging from the roof that will impale him if he lets go of the rope he's holding. Then he sets the building on fire. He had arranged events such that everyone would see the building burst into flames, break in, and immediately rush to find fire extinguishing grenades. Everyone tossed the grenades onto the flame... and here's the masterstroke: ''Nagito poisoned one of the grenades.'' The poison would kill Nagito and dissipate before harming anyone else, his savagely injured and now spear-impaled body shows injuries only he was in a position to inflict (suggesting suicide), but the one who killed him is the one who threw the poisoned grenade. There is no way of telling who that was.]] The evidence that found the killer is best described as a "hunch".

to:

* [[spoiler:Nagito Komaeda]] from ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa 2}}'' occasionally brags that he would be able to plan the perfect murder, and occasionally offers to let someone kill him with his plan... He's not exactly sane. And in chapter 5, he delivers on his plan. Details as follows: [[spoiler:He shuts himself in a building and ties himself up in a way that still allows for a little movement. He also stabs himself multiple times and sets up a spear hanging from the roof that will impale him if he lets go of the rope he's holding. Then he sets the building on fire. He had arranged events such that everyone would see the building burst into flames, break in, and immediately rush to find fire extinguishing grenades. Everyone tossed the grenades onto the flame... and here's the masterstroke: ''Nagito poisoned one of the grenades.'' The poison would kill Nagito and dissipate before harming anyone else, his savagely injured and now spear-impaled body shows injuries only he was in a position to inflict (suggesting suicide), but the one who killed him is the one who threw the poisoned grenade. There is no way of telling who that was.]] The evidence that found the killer is best described as a "hunch". [[spoiler: His actual goal was to have [[ReverseMole the traitor]] kill him, so she could escape because no one could potentially solve it. Hajime realized that.]]
** In ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa V3}}, [[spoiler: [[TheChessmaster Kokichi]] [[{{Troll}} Oma]] collaborates with Kaito Momota to create a murder that even Monokuma can't figure out, and would therefore ruin the killing game: Kokichi locks himself in a room with Kaito and allows the latter to push him under the hydraulic press while he wears his coat. Then, Kaito shuts himself inside an [[HumongousMecha Exisal]], pretending to be Kokichi by reading a book Kokichi gave him. If it wasn't for Shuichi's reasoning, Kaito dying of moon illness, and Kokichi forgetting which sleeve of his jacket Kaito left empty, the crime might have been never solved at all.]]

Added DiffLines:

** Discussed in the episode with the astronaut. While explaining his job to a class of kids, Monk says that the police can make numerous mistakes and still catch the criminal. The only way for a criminal to get away with a crime is for them to not make a single mistake. Because no human being is perfect, the odds are heavily in favor of the police.


* Averted in ''Series/Bones''. [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/Bones Finn Abernathy]] is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.

to:

* Averted in ''Series/Bones''. [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/Bones ''Series/{{Bones}}''. Finn Abernathy]] Abernathy is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.


* Averted in ''Series/Bones''. [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/Bones Finn Abernathy]] is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.

to:

* Averted in ''Series/Bones''. [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/Bones Finn Abernathy]] is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.

Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''Series/Bones''. [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/Bones Finn Abernathy]] is an intern who escaped from an abusive family, at around the same time his father disappeared mysteriously. Everyone is convinced that he killed his father, and that he studied forensic pathology in order to see how he could get away with it. When Dr. Brennan confronts him directly on this, Finn states that he seriously thought about murdering his father, but his studies showed that Dr. Brennan was so expert at her job that she would find a way to prove that he did it, and so he never went through with it. Therefore, he didn't commit the perfect crime because he knew there was no such thing.

Added DiffLines:

** At the start of ''Unnatural Death'', Wimsey opines that to be successful, a crime mustn't even be suspected. The moment a crime is suspected, it's a failure.


* Every episode of ''Manga/MajinTanteiNougamiNeuro'' is about some killer who pulls off either a ridiculously intricate murder or a ridiculously intricate alibi. Or both, or both at once. Neuro only manages to solve the case because of his "777 Underworld Tools."

to:

* Every episode of ''Manga/MajinTanteiNougamiNeuro'' is about some killer who pulls off either a ridiculously intricate murder or a ridiculously intricate alibi. Or both, or both at once. Neuro only manages to solve the case cases because of his "777 Underworld Tools."


Compare MakeItLookLikeAnAccident.

to:

Compare MakeItLookLikeAnAccident.
MakeItLookLikeAnAccident. If someone suspects something, the criminal may taunt them with a ProofDare.


* ''Film/TheThomasCrownAffair'': An EccentricMillionaire directs a bank robbery, keeping his identity hidden from the people he hires to carry it out.

to:

* ''Film/TheThomasCrownAffair'': ''Film/TheThomasCrownAffair1968'': An EccentricMillionaire directs a bank robbery, keeping his identity hidden from the people he hires to carry it out.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 111

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report