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* During UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, U.S. soldiers actually preferred enemy Kalashnikovs to their own M16s. The original M16 had ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle#Adoption numerous]]'' issues. The guns themselves were issued without cleaning kits as they were supposedly [[NeverNeedsSharpening "maintenance free" or even "self-cleaning"]], even though the gas system directly shot gases from firing into the receiver to push back the bolt (made worse because of a switch immediately before adoption to a dirtier-burning form of gunpowder than the rifle was designed for), and their polymer stocks were delicate due to the over-complicated recoil-compensating buffer tube taking up a good chunk of space within them. In comparison, the Kalashnikov was more reliable and sturdier. The Kalashnikov was also well-liked by LRRP fireteams and special forces troops, the former who operated in enemy territory for long periods of time, the latter who often disguised themselves as enemy soldiers.

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* During UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, U.S. soldiers actually preferred enemy Kalashnikovs to their own M16s. The original M16 had ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle#Adoption numerous]]'' issues. The guns themselves were issued without cleaning kits as they were supposedly [[NeverNeedsSharpening "maintenance free" or even "self-cleaning"]], even though the gas system directly shot gases from firing into the receiver to push back the bolt (made worse because of a switch immediately before adoption to a dirtier-burning form of gunpowder than the rifle was designed for), and their polymer stocks were delicate due to the over-complicated recoil-compensating buffer tube taking up a good chunk of space within them. In comparison, the Kalashnikov was more reliable and sturdier. The Kalashnikov was also well-liked frequently used by LRRP fireteams and special forces troops, the former who operated in enemy territory for long periods of time, the latter who often disguised themselves as enemy soldiers.


* During UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, U.S. soldiers actually preferred enemy Kalashnikovs to their own M16s. The original M16 had ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle#Adoption numerous]]'' issues. The guns themselves were issued without cleaning kits as they were supposedly [[NeverNeedsSharpening "maintenance free" or even "self-cleaning"]], even though the gas system directly shot gases from firing into the receiver to push back the bolt (made worse because of a switch immediately before adoption to a dirtier-burning form of gunpowder than the rifle was designed for), and their polymer stocks were delicate due to the over-complicated recoil-compensating buffer tube taking up a good chunk of space within them. In comparison, the Kalashnikov was more reliable and sturdier. The Kalashnikov was also preferred by LRRP and special forces troops, the former who operated in enemy territory for long periods of time, the latter who often disguised themselves as enemy soldiers.

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* During UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, U.S. soldiers actually preferred enemy Kalashnikovs to their own M16s. The original M16 had ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle#Adoption numerous]]'' issues. The guns themselves were issued without cleaning kits as they were supposedly [[NeverNeedsSharpening "maintenance free" or even "self-cleaning"]], even though the gas system directly shot gases from firing into the receiver to push back the bolt (made worse because of a switch immediately before adoption to a dirtier-burning form of gunpowder than the rifle was designed for), and their polymer stocks were delicate due to the over-complicated recoil-compensating buffer tube taking up a good chunk of space within them. In comparison, the Kalashnikov was more reliable and sturdier. The Kalashnikov was also preferred well-liked by LRRP fireteams and special forces troops, the former who operated in enemy territory for long periods of time, the latter who often disguised themselves as enemy soldiers.


** ''ComicBook/TheBoys'' has an exaggeration of the real-life M16's issues to point out the utter incompetence of Vought Corporation at just about anything they do. During [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar Vietnam]], an American detachment is slaughtered, unable to fight back because of their useless rifles. Adding insult to injury, the Viet Cong decapitated the dead and stuck the soldiers' heads on their own rifles, not looting a single one.
** If it's a work set in WW 2, the Germans have better weapons, period. Admittedly there is a degree of TruthInTelevision, but reading gives the impression that Allied troops might as well have been piloting vehicles made from plywood and cobwebs.

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** ''ComicBook/TheBoys'' has an exaggeration of the real-life M16's issues to point out the utter incompetence of Vought Corporation at just about anything they do. During [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar Vietnam]], an one thousand American detachment is slaughtered, troops are slaughtered at Ia Drang, unable to fight back because of their useless rifles.rifles cannot fire a single bullet. Adding insult to injury, the Viet Cong decapitated the dead and stuck the soldiers' heads on their own rifles, not looting a single one.
** If it's a work set in WW 2, [=WW2=], the Germans have better weapons, period. Admittedly there is a degree of TruthInTelevision, but reading gives the impression that Allied troops might as well have been piloting vehicles made from plywood and cobwebs.


* During UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, U.S. soldiers actually preferred enemy Kalashnikovs to their own M16s. The original M16 had ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle#Adoption numerous]]'' issues. The guns themselves were issued without cleaning kits as they were supposedly [[NeverNeedsSharpening "maintenance free" or even "self-cleaning"]], even though the gas system directly shot gases from firing into the receiver to push back the bolt (made worse because of a switch immediately before adoption to a dirtier-burning form of gunpowder than the rifle was designed for), and their polymer stocks were delicate due to the over-complicated recoil-compensating buffer tube taking up a good chunk of space within them. In comparison, the Kalashnikov was more reliable and sturdier.

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* During UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, U.S. soldiers actually preferred enemy Kalashnikovs to their own M16s. The original M16 had ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_rifle#Adoption numerous]]'' issues. The guns themselves were issued without cleaning kits as they were supposedly [[NeverNeedsSharpening "maintenance free" or even "self-cleaning"]], even though the gas system directly shot gases from firing into the receiver to push back the bolt (made worse because of a switch immediately before adoption to a dirtier-burning form of gunpowder than the rifle was designed for), and their polymer stocks were delicate due to the over-complicated recoil-compensating buffer tube taking up a good chunk of space within them. In comparison, the Kalashnikov was more reliable and sturdier. The Kalashnikov was also preferred by LRRP and special forces troops, the former who operated in enemy territory for long periods of time, the latter who often disguised themselves as enemy soldiers.



* During the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar, the soldiers of the Communist Party and of the local Nationalist-aligned warlords were often so badly equipped that stealing Japanese gear was considered a high-priority mission. While Japanese weapons were considerably inferior to the European gear the crack Nationalist troops had, they were lightyears better than the homemade guns or outdated rifles these guerillas generally used. Indeed, there is a common folk song extolling the virtues of fighting a rich enemy because of all the cool weapons you can steal from them:

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* During the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar, the soldiers of the Communist Party and of the local Nationalist-aligned warlords warlord troops were often so badly equipped that stealing Japanese gear was considered a high-priority mission. While Japanese weapons were considerably inferior to the European gear the crack Nationalist troops had, they were lightyears better than the homemade guns or outdated rifles these guerillas generally used.the Communists and warlord soldiers were armed with. Indeed, there is a common folk song extolling the virtues of fighting a rich enemy because of all the cool weapons you can steal from them:


* Downplayed in ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', as ammunition tends to be shared. Swapping for an enemy weapon thus is reduced to preference (guns tend to do the same damage regardless). On top of that, 9 (if not 10) times out of 10, you're given the perfect equipment for a mission from the beginning (although about half the time this only applies for your primary weapon - your secondary will usually be a bog-standard pistol most people will trade for their favorite or the most useful enemy weapon). And heaven help you if you switch out your lovely silenced weapons when doing a stealth mission. That said, in multiplayer you are usually given only two to three full magazines for each weapon - meaning that you'll be forced to swap for enemy weapons when you run dry without appropriate perks or just using the same gun everyone else is using. One trick in ''Call of Duty 4'' is to use the M9 as your sidearm if you're using a 9mm submachine gun for the main weapon - the bullets that the M9 comes with makes a ''de facto'' [[OneBulletClips extra magazine]].

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* Downplayed in ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', as ammunition tends to be shared. Swapping for an enemy weapon thus is reduced to preference (guns tend to do the same damage regardless). On top of that, 9 (if not 10) times out of 10, The game even attempts to play to both preferences; while you're almost always given the perfect equipment for a mission from the beginning (although about half the time this only applies for your primary weapon - that is set up perfectly for a mission (with the right set of attachments and enough ammo across the mission that you could just use that for the whole level if you wanted), your secondary will usually be a bog-standard pistol most people will that you won't be missing if you trade it for their your personal favorite or the most useful enemy weapon).gun. And heaven help you if you switch out your lovely silenced weapons when doing a stealth mission. That said, in multiplayer you are usually given only two to three full magazines for each weapon - meaning that you'll be forced to swap for enemy weapons when you run dry without appropriate perks or just using the same gun everyone else is using. One trick in ''Call of Duty 4'' is to use the M9 as your sidearm if you're using a 9mm submachine gun for the main weapon - the bullets that the M9 comes with makes a ''de facto'' [[OneBulletClips extra magazine]].



** ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAlliedAssault'' and expansions zig-zag this. [[UniversalAmmunition Ammo is universal]] for each kind of weapon (pistols, rifles, machine guns and so on), though if you don't have the Allies' version of a weapon type, you often end up with the German variety (the [=MP40=] is the best example, being used by the player on ''many'' levels), and sometimes the game almost arbitrarily allows you to carry both Allies' and Axis' varieties of guns.
*** An InUniverse example happens in ''Spearhead'', where, due to a shortage of weapons, ammunition, and other supplies, Barnes and his squad are tasked with raiding a German supply depot and taking as many supplies as as possible, including German weapons and ammunition. Thus, when the second part of the level begins, most of the paratroopers defending the line outside Bastogne are armed with German weapons.

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** ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAlliedAssault'' and expansions zig-zag this. [[UniversalAmmunition Ammo is universal]] for each kind of weapon (pistols, rifles, machine guns and so on), though if the game will typically restrict you don't have the Allies' version of to one weapon per type, and since you're typically far behind enemy lines and/or fighting on your own, your only options to fill out slots you didn't already start with a weapon type, you often end up with in is by looting them from the German variety (the [=MP40=] is the best example, being used by the player on ''many'' levels), and sometimes the game almost arbitrarily allows you to carry both Allies' and Axis' varieties of guns.
enemy.
*** An InUniverse example happens in ''Spearhead'', the ''Spearhead'' expansion, where, due to a shortage of weapons, ammunition, and other supplies, Barnes and his squad are tasked with raiding a German supply depot and taking as many supplies as as possible, including German weapons and ammunition. Thus, when the second part of the level begins, most of the paratroopers defending the line outside Bastogne are armed with German weapons.



** The modern ''[[VideoGame/MedalOfHonor2010 Medal of Honor]]'' games are a noticeable aversion, as enemy weapons are generally inferior to the American weaponry you start each level with, not handling as smoothly and often lacking GunAccessories like reflex sights, [=IR=] laser sights, and suppressors. Similar to ''Battlefield 3'' and ''Modern Warfare'', this is justified in that you play as American special forces soldiers while your enemies are relatively crudely equipped terrorists and pirates. In fact, in ''Medal of Honor: Warfighter'', you ''can't'' drop either of you starting weapons, enemy weapons going into a tertiary slot that's dropped as soon as you try to go back to either of your own guns.
* In every ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'' instalment, it's not uncommon to see CT players drop whatever gun they're using for an AK-47 or an SG-552. That or the Terrorists dropping whatever they were using for an [=M4A1=] rifle.

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** The modern ''[[VideoGame/MedalOfHonor2010 Medal of Honor]]'' games are a noticeable aversion, as enemy weapons are generally inferior to the American weaponry you start each level with, not handling as smoothly and often lacking GunAccessories like reflex sights, [=IR=] IR laser sights, and suppressors. Similar to ''Battlefield 3'' and ''Modern Warfare'', this is justified in that you play as American special forces soldiers while your enemies are relatively crudely equipped terrorists and pirates. In fact, in ''Medal of Honor: Warfighter'', you ''can't'' drop either of you starting weapons, enemy weapons going into a tertiary slot that's dropped as soon as you try to go back to either of your own guns.
* In every ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'' instalment, installment, it's not uncommon to see CT players drop whatever gun they're using for an AK-47 or an SG-552. That or the Terrorists dropping whatever they were using for an [=M4A1=] rifle.



** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'':
*** {{Enforced|Trope}}. The level at which certain items appear in shops is slightly higher than the level at which those same items [[RandomDrops randomly appear]] as loot in chests and on enemies. Additionally, you have to follow the [[MagicalSociety Mages Guild]] sidequest line up to a certain point (which requires non-trivial progress) before you can start enchanting your own equipment. Presumably, this is to keep players from building up gold and creating their own DiscOneNuke (a {{Nerf}} on enchanting from ''Oblivion'''s predecessor, ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]''). However, enchanted items can be found on enemies without needing to progress in the Mages Guild. Why not just loot that slain enemy's enchanted weapon? The point about enchanting is even [[LampshadeHanging mentioned directly by NPCs,]] for much the same reason.
*** Which leads to the logical conclusion reached by the author of ''Webcomic/{{Concerned}}'', Chris Livingston, when [[http://www.screencuisine.net/hlcomic/index.php?date=2006-07-24 discussing]] whether scrounging weapons and ammo off of dead allies without checking if they're actually dead makes you - and, [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation by extension, the player character]] - a dickweed:
--->"One of the first times I played Oblivion, I was fighting alongside some NPC soldier inside the first Oblivion gate. This NPC died during a battle, so I stripped him of his armor and weapons, which were better than my current ones, and left him dead and naked on the blasted planes of the underworld. A little later I died, and hadn't saved my progress. So, when I reloaded, the NPC was there, alive. And, this time, he didn't die in the battle. He was pretty, you know, beat up, though, and since he had died the last time, I sort of thought it was okay to, you know... totally bludgeon him to death and take his cool stuff. Now that's being a dickweed."

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'':
*** {{Enforced|Trope}}.
Oblivion]]'' {{enforce|dTrope}}s this trope. The level at which certain items appear in shops is slightly higher than the level at which those same items [[RandomDrops randomly appear]] as loot in chests and on enemies. Additionally, you have to follow the [[MagicalSociety Mages Guild]] sidequest line up to a certain point (which requires non-trivial progress) before you can start enchanting your own equipment. Presumably, this is to keep players from building up gold and creating their own DiscOneNuke (a {{Nerf}} on enchanting from ''Oblivion'''s predecessor, ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]''). However, enchanted items can be found on enemies without needing to progress in the Mages Guild. Why not just loot that slain enemy's enchanted weapon? The point about enchanting is even [[LampshadeHanging mentioned directly by NPCs,]] for much the same reason.
*** Which leads to the logical conclusion reached by the author of ''Webcomic/{{Concerned}}'', Chris Livingston, when [[http://www.screencuisine.net/hlcomic/index.php?date=2006-07-24 discussing]] whether scrounging weapons and ammo off of dead allies without checking if they're actually dead makes you - and, [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation by extension, the player character]] - a dickweed:
--->"One of the first times I played Oblivion, I was fighting alongside some NPC soldier inside the first Oblivion gate. This NPC died during a battle, so I stripped him of his armor and weapons, which were better than my current ones, and left him dead and naked on the blasted planes of the underworld. A little later I died, and hadn't saved my progress. So, when I reloaded, the NPC was there, alive. And, this time, he didn't die in the battle. He was pretty, you know, beat up, though, and since he had died the last time, I sort of thought it was okay to, you know... totally bludgeon him to death and take his cool stuff. Now that's being a dickweed."
reason.


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* Discussed in ''Webcomic/{{Concerned}}'' [[http://www.screencuisine.net/hlcomic/index.php?date=2006-07-24 #173]], where the author's notes for the comic talk about whether scrounging weapons and ammo off of dead allies without checking if they're actually dead makes you - and, [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation by extension, the player character]] - a dickweed:
-->"One of the first times I played [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]], I was fighting alongside some NPC soldier inside the first Oblivion gate. This NPC died during a battle, so I stripped him of his armor and weapons, which were better than my current ones, and left him dead and naked on the blasted planes of the underworld. A little later I died, and hadn't saved my progress. So, when I reloaded, the NPC was there, alive. And, this time, he didn't die in the battle. He was pretty, you know, beat up, though, and since he had died the last time, I sort of thought it was okay to, you know... totally bludgeon him to death and take his cool stuff. Now that's being a dickweed."


* ''Film/GenerationKill'' points out why this is generally a terrible idea in warfare, for the reasons enumerated in the Real Life examples given below.



* Averted in ''War of the Rats'' by David Robbins, when the Soviet sniper instructor says the Mauser [=K98k=] is an inferior sniper rifle to the Moisin-Nagant they use. However he points out that German snipers also use the Moisin-Nagant for this reason. "Your job is not to die and let these rifles fall into the enemy's hands. Let them keep using their German shit."

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* Averted in ''War of the Rats'' by David Robbins, when the Soviet sniper instructor says the Mauser [=K98k=] is an inferior sniper rifle to the Moisin-Nagant Mosin-Nagant they use. However he points out that German snipers also use the Moisin-Nagant Mosin-Nagant for this reason. "Your job is not to die and let these rifles fall into the enemy's hands. Let them keep using their German shit."



* ''Series/GenerationKill'' points out why this is generally a terrible idea in warfare, for the reasons enumerated in the Real Life examples given below.



* Downplayed in ''Series/Sharpe'' where the protagonists use French equipment because it's better, but still use their own rifles which they are proficient with.

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* Downplayed in ''Series/Sharpe'' ''Series/{{Sharpe}}'' where the protagonists use French equipment because it's better, but still use their own rifles which they are proficient with.



* In ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'', it's not uncommon to see CT players drop whatever gun they're using for an AK-47 or an SG-552. That or the Terrorists dropping whatever they were using for an [=M4A1=] rifle.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'', every ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'' instalment, it's not uncommon to see CT players drop whatever gun they're using for an AK-47 or an SG-552. That or the Terrorists dropping whatever they were using for an [=M4A1=] rifle.


[-[[caption-width-right:350:[[HumorMode So that's why the Wehrmacht]] [[GeniusBonus was running out of guns by the war's end!]][[note]][[CaptainObvious The Wehrmacht was not running out of guns by the end of World War II because this soldier stole them]], though their enemies being able to claim whatever equipment the Wehrmacht could not hold onto no doubt contributed.[[/note]]]]-]

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[-[[caption-width-right:350:[[HumorMode So that's why the Wehrmacht]] [[GeniusBonus was running out of guns by the war's end!]][[note]][[CaptainObvious The end!]][[note]]The Wehrmacht was not running out of guns by the end of World War II because this soldier stole them]], them, though their enemies being able to claim whatever equipment the Wehrmacht could not hold onto no doubt contributed.[[/note]]]]-]

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* Downplayed in ''Series/Sharpe'' where the protagonists use French equipment because it's better, but still use their own rifles which they are proficient with.

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** InvertedTrope in VideoGame/Fallout4. 90% of Super Mutants, Raiders, Slavers, and Institute Synths (i.e. pretty much any given mook who isn't carrying an AwesomeButImpractical heavy weapon) carry variants of three weapons: the .308 hunting rifle, the [[https://fallout.fandom.com/wiki/Pipe_gun_(Fallout_4) .38 pipe gun]], and the [[https://fallout.fandom.com/wiki/Institute_laser Institute laser gun]]. There are variants of them due to mods being slapped on (e.g. a pipe gun could be a rifle with a stock, scope, and bayonet, or it could be a sawed-off machine pistol with an automatic rate of fire), but they're all essentially the same weapon firing the same bullets. Even with the best mods (which almost never spawn on enemies), these guns pale in comparison to the guns you can buy from merchants, get as part of quests, or create on your own. This was likely done to force the player to indulge in ItemCrafting.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Einhander}}'' has several powerful weapons wielded by the enemies that you initially don't start out with, this includes the Grenade and Flash. Of course, one of the game's main mechanics is killing those enemies and grabbing said weapons for yourself. It's also subverted in that you can start out with these weapons in your initial loadout once you manage to obtain them once.


*** An InUniverseExample happens in ''Spearhead'', where, due to a shortage of weapons, ammunition, and other supplies, Barnes and his squad are tasked with raiding a German supply depot and taking as many supplies as as possible, including German weapons and ammunition. Thus, when the second part of the level begins, most of the paratroopers defending the line outside Bastogne are armed with German weapons.

to:

*** An InUniverseExample InUniverse example happens in ''Spearhead'', where, due to a shortage of weapons, ammunition, and other supplies, Barnes and his squad are tasked with raiding a German supply depot and taking as many supplies as as possible, including German weapons and ammunition. Thus, when the second part of the level begins, most of the paratroopers defending the line outside Bastogne are armed with German weapons.

Added DiffLines:

*** An InUniverseExample happens in ''Spearhead'', where, due to a shortage of weapons, ammunition, and other supplies, Barnes and his squad are tasked with raiding a German supply depot and taking as many supplies as as possible, including German weapons and ammunition. Thus, when the second part of the level begins, most of the paratroopers defending the line outside Bastogne are armed with German weapons.


* In the World War II ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series of games, German weapons can be irresistible (especially when you're carrying around the Sten, which [[RealityIsUnrealistic for some reason can't take ammo from enemy [=MP40's=] even though they both fire the same round from the same magazines]]). One of the best reasons to do it is because you can only refill the ammo reserves by picking up the guns of dead allies, while it's easy to collect more ammo than necessary from [[OneManArmy all the mooks you're mowing down]]. You might pick up a [=Kar98K=], which frequently one-shot kills, or the accurate and steady [=MP40=], or both. If you're lucky you can find yourself a Gewehr 43 rifle.

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* In the World War II ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series of games, German weapons can be irresistible (especially when you're carrying around the Sten, which [[RealityIsUnrealistic for some reason can't take ammo from enemy [=MP40's=] even though they both fire the same round from the same magazines]]).round]]). One of the best reasons to do it is because you can only refill the ammo reserves by picking up the guns of dead allies, while it's easy to collect more ammo than necessary from [[OneManArmy all the mooks you're mowing down]]. You might pick up a [=Kar98K=], which frequently one-shot kills, or the accurate and steady [=MP40=], or both. If you're lucky you can find yourself a Gewehr 43 rifle.



** Conversely, the [=MP40=] was a popular prize for British soldiers, since they could use the same ammo from their otherwise [[ReliablyUnreliableGuns cheaply made]] Sten guns. In fact, the British [[CombatPragmatist specifically designed]] the Sten to [[UniversalAmmo use the same ammo AND magazines]] as the [=MP38=] and [=MP40=]. Luger [=P08=] pistols were similarly popular among American soldiers, though these were mostly as war trophies rather than a replacement for their own sidearms; American soldiers were quite attached to .45 ACP for a long while. Allied soldiers of other nations, however, are a more debatable case at least one Brazilian soldier picked up a Walther P38 as his sidearm of choice until he came back home.

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** Conversely, the [=MP40=] was a popular prize for British soldiers, since they could use the same ammo from their otherwise [[ReliablyUnreliableGuns cheaply made]] Sten guns. In fact, the British [[CombatPragmatist specifically designed]] the Sten to [[UniversalAmmo use the same ammo AND magazines]] ammo]] as the [=MP38=] and [=MP40=]. Luger [=P08=] pistols were similarly popular among American soldiers, though these were mostly as war trophies rather than a replacement for their own sidearms; American soldiers were quite attached to .45 ACP for a long while. Allied soldiers of other nations, however, are a more debatable case at least one Brazilian soldier picked up a Walther P38 as his sidearm of choice until he came back home.


** If it's a work set in WW 2, the Germans have better weapons, period. Admittedly there is a degree of TruthInTelevision where tanks and planes are concerned, but reading gives the impression that Allied troops might as well have been piloting vehicles made from plywood and cobwebs.

to:

** If it's a work set in WW 2, the Germans have better weapons, period. Admittedly there is a degree of TruthInTelevision where tanks and planes are concerned, TruthInTelevision, but reading gives the impression that Allied troops might as well have been piloting vehicles made from plywood and cobwebs.


* In the World War II ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series of games, German weapons can be irresistible (especially when you're carrying around the Sten, which [[RealityIsUnrealistic for some reason can't take ammo from enemy [=MP40's=] despite both being 9x19mm Para]]). One of the best reasons to do it is because you can only refill the ammo reserves by picking up the guns of dead allies, while it's easy to collect more ammo than necessary from [[OneManArmy all the mooks you're mowing down]]. You might pick up a [=Kar98K=], which frequently one-shot kills, or the accurate and steady [=MP40=], or both. If you're lucky you can find yourself a Gewehr 43 rifle.

to:

* In the World War II ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series of games, German weapons can be irresistible (especially when you're carrying around the Sten, which [[RealityIsUnrealistic for some reason can't take ammo from enemy [=MP40's=] despite even though they both being 9x19mm Para]]).fire the same round from the same magazines]]). One of the best reasons to do it is because you can only refill the ammo reserves by picking up the guns of dead allies, while it's easy to collect more ammo than necessary from [[OneManArmy all the mooks you're mowing down]]. You might pick up a [=Kar98K=], which frequently one-shot kills, or the accurate and steady [=MP40=], or both. If you're lucky you can find yourself a Gewehr 43 rifle.

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