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** In 2014, they [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-25783245 were featured in]] a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuF8wX0f9wU Guinness advert]].

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** In 2014, they [[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-25783245 were featured in]] a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuF8wX0f9wU com/watch?v=66HuFrMZWMo Guinness advert]].


** Brummel's fashion sense, and most notably, the dress code he devised for the Almack's Club in London, would go on to inspire the modern business suit/coat-and-tails. Strangely, his fashion sense was much more austere and simpler than the gaudy nobles and fops before and after him, he preferred a simple white on black look and a streamlined silhouette. His style caught on fantastically, especially after the [[RegencyEngland Prince Regent]] (later King George IV) began to follow Brummel's lead (he would spend hours watching Brummel get dressed just to see what he did to look so good). Before Brummel, dressing well for men meant wearing the frilliest, gaudiest, ridiculous-pattern-iest clothing possible, with all kinds of unnecessary accessories (jewels, wigs, etc.) to show off your wealth; after Brummel, it meant wearing the finest cloth, the most elegant cut, and the soberest and most austere accessories (a watch, a hat, and a cravat, all tastefully made) to show off your taste. This was helped along by the changing times: with industrialisation, anyone could get rich and afford gaudy clothes--which were cheaper by the day anyway, since the first industry industrialisation transformed was textiles, and previously exclusive fabrics were now being mass produced, especially now that the Jacquard loom could make even the most complex pattern almost as easily as plain cloth. But no matter how rich you were, you couldn't buy good taste, which suited the traditional British upper crust very well.[[note]]In a way, the Brummel style was a key part of developing the modern habit of elites favouring simple, austere styles as a means of distinguishing themselves--now that any fool who could get the money could buy gilded everything and silk clothes in any colour they desired, it became a mark of distinction to wear or own something that was simple, yet demonstrated masterful workmanship. It's this kind of thinking that eventually led to Modernism and the AsceticAesthetic that continues to pop up periodically in modern architecture and design.[[/note]]

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** Brummel's fashion sense, and most notably, the dress code he devised for the Almack's Club in London, would go on to inspire the modern business suit/coat-and-tails. Strangely, his fashion sense was much more austere and simpler than the gaudy nobles and fops before and after him, he preferred a simple white on black look and a streamlined silhouette. His style caught on fantastically, especially after the [[RegencyEngland Prince Regent]] (later King George IV) began to follow Brummel's lead (he would spend hours watching Brummel get dressed just to see what he did to look so good). Before Brummel, dressing well for men meant wearing the frilliest, gaudiest, ridiculous-pattern-iest clothing possible, with all kinds of unnecessary accessories (jewels, wigs, etc.) to show off your wealth; after Brummel, it meant wearing the finest cloth, the most elegant cut, and the soberest and most austere accessories (a watch, a hat, and a cravat, all tastefully made) to show off your taste. This was helped along by the changing times: with industrialisation, anyone could get rich and afford gaudy clothes--which were cheaper by the day anyway, since the first industry industrialisation transformed was textiles, and previously exclusive fabrics were which could now being be mass produced, especially now that produced even in formerly-exclusive patterns (thanks to the Jacquard loom could make even the most complex pattern almost as easily as plain cloth.loom). But no matter how rich you were, you couldn't buy good taste, which suited the traditional British upper crust very well.[[note]]In a way, the Brummel style was a key part of developing the modern habit of elites favouring simple, austere styles as a means of distinguishing themselves--now that any fool who could get the money could buy gilded everything and silk clothes in any colour they desired, it became a mark of distinction to wear or own something that was simple, yet demonstrated masterful workmanship. It's this kind of thinking that eventually led to Modernism and the AsceticAesthetic that continues to pop up periodically in modern architecture and design.[[/note]]


** Brummel's fashion sense, and most notably, the dress code he devised for the Almack's Club in London, would go on to inspire the modern business suit/coat-and-tails. Strangely, his fashion sense was much more austere and simpler than the gaudy nobles and fops before and after him, he preferred a simple white on black look and a streamlined silhouette. His style caught on fantastically, especially after the [[RegencyEngland Prince Regent]] (later King George IV) began to follow Brummel's lead (he would spend hours watching Brummel get dressed just to see what he did to look so good). Before Brummel, dressing well for men meant wearing the frilliest, gaudiest, ridiculous-pattern-iest clothing possible, with all kinds of unnecessary accessories (jewels, wigs, etc.) to show off your wealth; after Brummel, it meant wearing the finest cloth, the most elegant cut, and the soberest and most austere accessories (a watch, a hat, and a cravat, all tastefully made) to show off your taste. This was helped along by the changing times: with industrialisation, anyone could get rich and afford gaudy clothes; but no matter how rich you were, you couldn't buy good taste, which suited the traditional British upper crust very well.[[note]]In a way, the Brummel style was a key part of developing the modern habit of elites favouring simple, austere styles as a means of distinguishing themselves--now that any fool who could get the money could buy gilded everything and silk clothes in any colour they desired, it became a mark of distinction to wear or own something that was simple, yet demonstrated masterful workmanship. It's this kind of thinking that eventually led to Modernism and the AsceticAesthetic that continues to pop up periodically in modern architecture and design.[[/note]]

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** Brummel's fashion sense, and most notably, the dress code he devised for the Almack's Club in London, would go on to inspire the modern business suit/coat-and-tails. Strangely, his fashion sense was much more austere and simpler than the gaudy nobles and fops before and after him, he preferred a simple white on black look and a streamlined silhouette. His style caught on fantastically, especially after the [[RegencyEngland Prince Regent]] (later King George IV) began to follow Brummel's lead (he would spend hours watching Brummel get dressed just to see what he did to look so good). Before Brummel, dressing well for men meant wearing the frilliest, gaudiest, ridiculous-pattern-iest clothing possible, with all kinds of unnecessary accessories (jewels, wigs, etc.) to show off your wealth; after Brummel, it meant wearing the finest cloth, the most elegant cut, and the soberest and most austere accessories (a watch, a hat, and a cravat, all tastefully made) to show off your taste. This was helped along by the changing times: with industrialisation, anyone could get rich and afford gaudy clothes; but clothes--which were cheaper by the day anyway, since the first industry industrialisation transformed was textiles, and previously exclusive fabrics were now being mass produced, especially now that the Jacquard loom could make even the most complex pattern almost as easily as plain cloth. But no matter how rich you were, you couldn't buy good taste, which suited the traditional British upper crust very well.[[note]]In a way, the Brummel style was a key part of developing the modern habit of elites favouring simple, austere styles as a means of distinguishing themselves--now that any fool who could get the money could buy gilded everything and silk clothes in any colour they desired, it became a mark of distinction to wear or own something that was simple, yet demonstrated masterful workmanship. It's this kind of thinking that eventually led to Modernism and the AsceticAesthetic that continues to pop up periodically in modern architecture and design.[[/note]]


** Unbelievable as it is, the ''Manga/PokemonSpecial'' manga contains an even more obvious example...Ruby.

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** Unbelievable as it is, the ''Manga/PokemonSpecial'' ''Manga/PokemonAdventures'' manga contains an even more obvious example...example... Ruby.


* UsefulNotex/LouisXIV of France was a dandy who subverted the trope in order to better control the French nobility. He made his most senior noblemen attend him at all times, and instead of giving them money or titles allowed them privileges such as being allowed to help him dress, undress, or eat dinner. (It took about 200 men and an hour and a half to help Louis get dressed most mornings.) The point was to keep them at Versailles doing pointless and stupid things, which he hoped would prevent them from raising peasant armies against him; in the meantime, Louis himself would only be pretending to wake up at the formal ''levée'' and actually woke up an hour or two earlier to handle the royal paperwork. To paraphrase Will Cuppy: if you think society's bad now, be glad you don't have to get up at seven in the morning to watch Louis [=XIV=] put on his pants.

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* UsefulNotex/LouisXIV UsefulNotes/LouisXIV of France was a dandy who subverted the trope in order to better control the French nobility. He made his most senior noblemen attend him at all times, and instead of giving them money or titles allowed them privileges such as being allowed to help him dress, undress, or eat dinner. (It took about 200 men and an hour and a half to help Louis get dressed most mornings.) The point was to keep them at Versailles doing pointless and stupid things, which he hoped would prevent them from raising peasant armies against him; in the meantime, Louis himself would only be pretending to wake up at the formal ''levée'' and actually woke up an hour or two earlier to handle the royal paperwork. To paraphrase Will Cuppy: if you think society's bad now, be glad you don't have to get up at seven in the morning to watch Louis [=XIV=] put on his pants.

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* Actor and ''Series/SchittsCreek'' creator Creator/DanielLevy has integrated his own love of fashion into his show, and although he doesn't dress as outrageously as his character, his fashion sense is a key part of his persona.

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* Long-haired Bananya from Anime/{{Bananya}}, who spends most of his entire time grooming his mane every 2 hours.


* Harris was the squad Dandy on ''Series/BarneyMiller''. He was always dressed to the nines and kept spare pieces of clothing in his desk to dress up or dress down as he liked. Barney gave him "flashy efficiency" on one performance review. At one point, Harris actually refused to wear his blues on a uniform day because it offends his fshion sense (among other reasons).

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* Harris was the squad Dandy on ''Series/BarneyMiller''. He was always dressed to the nines and kept spare pieces of clothing in his desk to dress up or dress down as he liked. Barney gave him "flashy efficiency" on one performance review. At one point, Harris actually refused to wear his blues on a uniform day because it offends his fshion fashion sense (among other reasons).



* David Rose on ''Series/SchittsCreek'' epitomizes this trope as his black and white wardrobe made up of men's designers like Rick Owens and Helmut Lang is a key part of his identity and represents the life of wealth and privilege he has lost. He also has a strong interest in grooming and personal care, which helps him select and market products for his store Rose Apothecary.

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* David Rose on ''Series/SchittsCreek'' epitomizes this trope as is extremely attached to his dramatic black and white wardrobe made up of men's pieces by designers like Rick Owens and Helmut Lang is Lang. His clothes are a key part of his identity and represents represent the life of wealth and privilege he has lost. He David also has a strong interest in grooming and personal care, which helps him select and market products for his store Rose Apothecary.


* David Rose on ''Series/SchittsCreek'' epitomizes this trope as his black and white wardrobe made up of men's designers like Rick Owens and Helmut Lang is a key part of his identity and represents the life of wealth and privilege he has lost. He also has a strong interest in grooming and personal care, which helps him select and market products for his store The Rose Apothecary.

to:

* David Rose on ''Series/SchittsCreek'' epitomizes this trope as his black and white wardrobe made up of men's designers like Rick Owens and Helmut Lang is a key part of his identity and represents the life of wealth and privilege he has lost. He also has a strong interest in grooming and personal care, which helps him select and market products for his store The Rose Apothecary.

Added DiffLines:

* David Rose on ''Series/SchittsCreek'' epitomizes this trope as his black and white wardrobe made up of men's designers like Rick Owens and Helmut Lang is a key part of his identity and represents the life of wealth and privilege he has lost. He also has a strong interest in grooming and personal care, which helps him select and market products for his store The Rose Apothecary.


* [[KingdomHearts Marluxia.]] While he doesn't really dress any differently from the rest of the Organization members, the hair-flipping (and color of said hair), and the random flower petals, and the way [[ViewerGenderConfusion the creators had to specifically say he was male...]]

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* [[KingdomHearts [[Franchise/KingdomHearts Marluxia.]] While he doesn't really dress any differently from the rest of the Organization members, the hair-flipping (and color of said hair), and the random flower petals, and the way [[ViewerGenderConfusion the creators had to specifically say he was male...]]

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* Yūga Aaoyama from ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia''.


[[quoteright:231:[[VideoGame/Disgaea3AbsenceOfJustice https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dandy.JPG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:231:[-They don't get much dandier than Master Big Star. [[AwesomeMcCoolname Yes, that's his real name.]]-] ]]

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[[quoteright:231:[[VideoGame/Disgaea3AbsenceOfJustice [[quoteright:250:[[VideoGame/Disgaea3AbsenceOfJustice https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dandy.JPG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:231:[-They
org/pmwiki/pub/images/d3masterbigstar.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:250:[-They
don't get much dandier than Master Big Star. [[AwesomeMcCoolname Yes, that's his real name.]]-] ]]


!!Examples

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!!Examples!!Examples:



* Dandy from ''{{Moetan}}''.

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* Dandy from ''{{Moetan}}''.''Moetan''.



[[folder:Comics]]
* Franchise/{{Batman}}'s non-heroic persona, Bruce Wayne, is [[DependingOnTheWriter sometimes]] [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob portrayed]] as this. It's usually depicted as ObfuscatingStupidity: "There's no way that fop dandy could be a dreaded vigilante."

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[[folder:Comics]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Franchise/{{Batman}}'s ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'':
** Batman's
non-heroic persona, Bruce Wayne, is [[DependingOnTheWriter sometimes]] [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob portrayed]] as this. It's usually depicted as ObfuscatingStupidity: "There's no way that fop dandy could be a dreaded vigilante."



*** Honorable mentions: Ra's al Ghul and Vandal Savage (who is more of a generic JLA/JSA villain) are generally well dressed by the standards of ''some'' era, it's that ... since Vandal is OlderThanDirt and Ra's is at the very least OlderThanSteam ... it's often not ''this'' era. Neither Ra's nor Vandal are too concerned about getting their clothes (or hands) dirty when it comes time to fight, though.

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*** Honorable mentions: Ra's al Ghul and Vandal Savage (who is more of a generic JLA/JSA villain) are generally well dressed by the standards of ''some'' era, it's that ... that... since Vandal is OlderThanDirt and Ra's is at the very least OlderThanSteam ...OlderThanSteam... it's often not ''this'' era. Neither Ra's nor Vandal are too concerned about getting their clothes (or hands) dirty when it comes time to fight, though.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]Animation]]



* ''Film/XMenFilmSeries'': Professor X relishes being flawlessly handsome. He adores his hair and his clothes--even when he loses the former, he can still indulge in the latter--and he can be quite fussy about them (such as his NobodyTouchesTheHair moment in ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', and needlessly straightening his sleeves before he goes on a 4.5-hour-long drive from Westchester to Langley in [[https://streamable.com/rk5gn this deleted scene]] from ''Film/XMenApocalypse''). Xavier spends a lot of money on his suits, and he can be a bit overdressed at times (e.g. his outfit when he visits an incarcerated Erik in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'' is so swanky that it can be worn at a wedding). In ''Apocalypse'', he looks more like an '80s fashion model than a teacher, and his translucent white shirt is a little too sexy for an academic setting. Like most dandies, Charles also surrounds himself in luxury and is very fond of the finer things in life, plus he had a hedonistic streak when he was younger (specifically a penchant for sex and booze).

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* ''Film/XMenFilmSeries'': Professor X relishes being flawlessly handsome. He adores his hair and his clothes--even clothes -- even when he loses the former, he can still indulge in the latter--and latter -- and he can be quite fussy about them (such as his NobodyTouchesTheHair moment in ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', and needlessly straightening his sleeves before he goes on a 4.5-hour-long drive from Westchester to Langley in [[https://streamable.com/rk5gn this deleted scene]] from ''Film/XMenApocalypse''). Xavier spends a lot of money on his suits, and he can be a bit overdressed at times (e.g. his outfit when he visits an incarcerated Erik in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'' is so swanky that it can be worn at a wedding). In ''Apocalypse'', he looks more like an '80s fashion model than a teacher, and his translucent white shirt is a little too sexy for an academic setting. Like most dandies, Charles also surrounds himself in luxury and is very fond of the finer things in life, plus he had a hedonistic streak when he was younger (specifically a penchant for sex and booze).



* In ''{{Film/Ned Kelly}}'' (1970), Mick Jagger wears a velvet tailcoat and frilly shirt that wouldn't look out of place at a gathering of Carnaby Street {{Scooter Riding Mod}}s.

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* In ''{{Film/Ned Kelly}}'' (1970), ''Film/NedKelly'' (1970):
**
Mick Jagger wears a velvet tailcoat and frilly shirt that wouldn't look out of place at a gathering of Carnaby Street {{Scooter Riding Mod}}s.



[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': Lorne. To paraphrase Mayor Wilkins on ''Buffy''--"That is one ''exciting'' suit!"

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'': Lorne. To paraphrase Mayor Wilkins on ''Buffy''--"That ''Buffy'' -- "That is one ''exciting'' suit!"



---> So you're my replacements! A dandy and a clown!

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---> --->'''First Doctor:''' So you're my replacements! A dandy and a clown!



[[folder:Magazines]]
* Eustace Tilley, the semi-official mascot of ''Magazine/TheNewYorker''.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Pinball]]

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[[folder:Pinball]][[folder:Pinballs]]



[[folder:Theatre]]

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[[folder:Theatre]][[folder:Podcasts]]
* Algernon Sharp from ''Podcast/DiceFunk'' season 4 fits this trope to a tee, dressing in a provocatively flashy manner. He is a pick-up artist who does everything to be the center of attention, a practice referred as "Peacocking" in the setting of Valentine.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Print Media]]
* Eustace Tilley, the semi-official mascot of ''Magazine/TheNewYorker''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theater]]



[[folder:Webcomics]]

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[[folder:Webcomics]][[folder:Web Comics]]



* The Duck Guy from ''WebVideo/DontHugMeImScared'' really likes the different costumes he can try out in number 4 using "digital style!"



* Algernon Sharp from ''Podcast/DiceFunk'' season 4 fits this trope to a tee, dressing in a provocatively flashy manner. He is a pick-up artist who does everything to be the center of attention, a practice referred as "Peacocking" in the setting of Valentine.



[[folder: Western Animation]]

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[[folder: Western [[folder:Web Videos]]
* The Duck Guy from ''WebVideo/DontHugMeImScared'' really likes the different costumes he can try out in number 4 using "digital style!"
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western
Animation]]



** Prince Blueblood from ''"The Best Night Ever"'' also fits this trope.
** [[FanNickname "Steven Magnet"]], the water dragon from the second episode "Elements Of Harmony" easily qualifies for this.

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** Prince Blueblood from ''"The "The Best Night Ever"'' Ever" also fits this trope.
** [[FanNickname "Steven Magnet"]], the water dragon from the second episode "Elements Of of Harmony" easily qualifies for this.

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