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* ''Literature/{{August 1914}}'': The novel recounts the Battle of Tannenberg at the start of World War I, a CurbStompBattle in which an entire Russian army was surrounded and captured by the Germans. Colonel Vorotyntsev watches a Russian wagon train cross a bridge. One carter "even contrived to bounce along the cobbled road in a squatting Russian dance." Besides adding a little bit of atmosphere, this whole passage is meant to demonstrate how crude and half-assed the Russian supply system is; a theme throughout the whole book is how thoroughly EasyLogistics is averted, as Russian soldiers starve for days while on the march.

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* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' had SHUSH Agent Grizzlikov use the squat dance as a combat technique.


This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Russian and Ukrainian and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak]]'' or ''Gopak''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Russia and Ukraine. The Squat dance is also a integral part of Russian dances like Barinya, Leto, Trepak and many more.

The dance is commonly depicted with dancers barking "Hey! Hey! Hey!" while squatting, which is another point of mixing things up and thinking that all Russians say "Hey!" while dancing not just like this, but in any other style. On occasions, it can be substituted with "Hop! Hop!"[[note]]If actual Russians are dancing, they would shout "Op! Op!" without any h's.[[/note]]

The squat-and-kick move is properly called ''prisyadka'' (knee-bending) and is just one part of the ''Hopak'' dance, but [[PopCulturalOsmosis it's the only part known to most non-Russians]] due to its inherently funny looks and need for athleticism in order to accomplish. It's indeed one of the more difficult parts of the dance, requiring good balance and substantial leg muscle strength, but of course MotherRussiaMakesYouStrong. In fact, there is an entire martial art based on ''Hopak'' dancing called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat_Hopak Combat Hopak]].

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This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually both Russian and Ukrainian Ukrainian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while derivate. While it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak]]'' or ''Gopak''[[note]]Spelled ''Gopak''.[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Russia and Ukraine. The Squat squat dance is also a integral part of Russian dances like Barinya, Leto, Trepak and many more.

The dance is commonly depicted with dancers barking "Hey! Hey! Hey!" while squatting, which is another point of mixing things up and thinking that all Russians say "Hey!" while dancing not just like this, but in any other style. On occasions, it can be substituted with "Hop! Hop!"[[note]]If actual Russians are were dancing, they would shout "Op! Op!" without any h's.[[/note]]

The squat-and-kick move itself is properly called ''prisyadka'' (knee-bending) and is just one part of the ''Hopak'' dance, but [[PopCulturalOsmosis it's the only part known to most non-Russians]] due to its inherently funny looks and need for obvious athleticism in order to accomplish.required. It's indeed one of the more difficult parts of the dance, requiring good balance and substantial leg muscle strength, but of course MotherRussiaMakesYouStrong. In fact, there is an entire martial art based on ''Hopak'' dancing called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat_Hopak Combat Hopak]].


This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Ukrainian and not Russian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak]]'' or ''Gopak''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Ukraine.

The dance is commonly depicted with dancers barking "Hey! Hey! Hey!" while squatting, which is another point of mixing things up and thinking that all Russians say "Hey!" while dancing not just like this, but in any other style. Again, this stems from Ukrainian language, since Russian language ''does not even have'' the soft "h" sound. On occasions, it can be substituted with "Hop! Hop!"[[note]]If actual Russians are dancing, they would shout "Op! Op!" without any h's.[[/note]]

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This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Russian and Ukrainian and not Russian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak]]'' or ''Gopak''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Ukraine.

Russia and Ukraine. The Squat dance is also a integral part of Russian dances like Barinya, Leto, Trepak and many more.

The dance is commonly depicted with dancers barking "Hey! Hey! Hey!" while squatting, which is another point of mixing things up and thinking that all Russians say "Hey!" while dancing not just like this, but in any other style. Again, this stems from Ukrainian language, since Russian language ''does not even have'' the soft "h" sound. On occasions, it can be substituted with "Hop! Hop!"[[note]]If actual Russians are dancing, they would shout "Op! Op!" without any h's.[[/note]]


* Naturally, works involving the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'''s equivalent of Russians take this UpToEleven. In the works of Creator/AAPessimal, when a group of "Rus" witches performs traditional dance at the annual Witch Trials, members of Lancre's Morris Dancing side are heard to remark that this is only a ''ladies''' team. Imagine an international against the ''men''?

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* Naturally, works involving the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'''s ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' equivalent of Russians take this UpToEleven. In the works of Creator/AAPessimal, when a group of "Rus" witches performs traditional dance at the annual Witch Trials, members of Lancre's Morris Dancing side are heard to remark that this is only a ''ladies''' team. Imagine an international against the ''men''?



[[folder: Fan Works ]]

* Naturally, works involving the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'''s equivalent of Russians take this UpToEleven. In the works of Creator/AAPessimal, when a group of "Rus" witches performs traditional dance at the annual Witch Trials, members of Lancre's Morris Dancing side are heard to remark that this is only a ''ladies''' team. Imagine an international against the ''men''?

[[/folder]]



[[folder: Fan Works ]]

* Naturally, works involving the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'s equivalent of Russians take this UpToEleven. In the works of Creator/AAPessimal, when a group of "Rus" witches performs traditional dance at the annual Witch Trials, members of Lancre's Morris Dancing side are heard to remark that this is only a ''ladies''' team. Imagine an international against the ''men''?

[[/folder]]


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[[folder: Fan Works ]]

* Naturally, works involving the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'s equivalent of Russians take this UpToEleven. In the works of Creator/AAPessimal, when a group of "Rus" witches performs traditional dance at the annual Witch Trials, members of Lancre's Morris Dancing side are heard to remark that this is only a ''ladies''' team. Imagine an international against the ''men''?

[[/folder]]







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* In ''Manga/TheVoynichHotel'', the witch sisters called the Three Mothers originally hail from Russia, and when the youngest goes back home to visit their teacher, they are shown doing the dance when they first reunite.


* In the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes cartoon ''Hare Tonic'', Elmer Fudd is afraid he has Rabbititis, and rushes to see a doctor, who is Bugs Bunny in disguise. Bugs tests Elmer Fudd's reflexes by alternately hitting each knee with a rubber mallet, and alternates between each knee faster and faster until Elmer is doing this dance. Bugs soon joins him, giving away his disguise in the process.

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* In the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes cartoon ''Hare Tonic'', ''WesternAnimation/HareTonic'', Elmer Fudd is afraid he has Rabbititis, and rushes to see a doctor, who is Bugs Bunny in disguise. Bugs tests Elmer Fudd's reflexes by alternately hitting each knee with a rubber mallet, and alternates between each knee faster and faster until Elmer is doing this dance. Bugs soon joins him, giving away his disguise in the process.


You know the one the dancers squat down with their arms folded and kick high alternating both legs, sometimes intercalating more squats up and down between flurries of kicks. If a HuskyRusskie is celebrating a victory for GloriousMotherRussia, he is 90% likely to be doing this dance.

This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Ukrainian and not Russian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak, or Gopak.]]''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Ukraine.

to:

You know the one the dancers squat down with their arms folded and kick high alternating both legs, with one leg and the other, sometimes intercalating more squats up and down between flurries of kicks. If a HuskyRusskie is celebrating a victory for GloriousMotherRussia, he is 90% likely to be doing this dance.

This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Ukrainian and not Russian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak, Hopak]]'' or Gopak.]]''[[note]]Spelled ''Gopak''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Ukraine.



The squat-and-kick move is properly called ''prisyadka'' (knee-bending) and is just one part of the ''Hopak'' dance, but [[PopCulturalOsmosis it's the only part known to most non-Russians]] due to its inherently funny looks and need for athleticism in order to accomplish. It's indeed one of the more difficult parts of the dance, requiring good balance and substantial leg muscle strength, but of course MotherRussiaMakesYouStrong. In fact, there is an entire martial art based on Hopak dancing called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat_Hopak Combat Hopak]].

to:

The squat-and-kick move is properly called ''prisyadka'' (knee-bending) and is just one part of the ''Hopak'' dance, but [[PopCulturalOsmosis it's the only part known to most non-Russians]] due to its inherently funny looks and need for athleticism in order to accomplish. It's indeed one of the more difficult parts of the dance, requiring good balance and substantial leg muscle strength, but of course MotherRussiaMakesYouStrong. In fact, there is an entire martial art based on Hopak ''Hopak'' dancing called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat_Hopak Combat Hopak]].


This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Ukrainian and not Russian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak, or Gopak.]]''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Ukraine.

to:

This trope's name is one of those cases of mislabeling by foreigners. For instance, its origin is actually Ukrainian and not Russian, and it's not commonly called "Cossack Dance" or some derivate; while it does receive occasionally the names of ''Kazotsky'' or ''Kazatsky'', which mean just that, the true name of this stage dance is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopak Hopak, or Gopak.]]''[[note]]Spelled Гопа́к in [[[TheBackwardsR [[TheBackwardsR the Cyrillic alphabet.]] [[/note]] Similarly, it gets sometimes referred as the ''Kazachok'' or ''Kozachok'' ("Little Cossack"), but this is a completely different folk dance that also comes from Ukraine.

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Also, don't confuse this with the "[[https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/why-do-slavs-squat-slav-squat Slav Squat]]" meme.


* Boris the Russian goose performs one in ''WesternAnimation/{{Balto}}'' (complete with accompanying yells of "''HEY!''") in an attempt to cheer Balto up. [[CrowningMomentofFunny For some reason]], it doesn't work.

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* Boris the Russian goose performs one in ''WesternAnimation/{{Balto}}'' (complete with accompanying yells of "''HEY!''") in an attempt to cheer Balto up. [[CrowningMomentofFunny For some reason]], reason, it doesn't work.



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* The monkey's dancing animation in ''VideoGame/UltimateChickenHorse''.

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