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* The parodic "Gidget Goes to Hell" by Suburban Lawns (1979) has a shark attack. Creator/JonathanDemme directed the video, which made it onto ''Television/SaturdayNightLive''.

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* The parodic "Gidget Goes to Hell" by Suburban Lawns (1979) has a shark attack. Creator/JonathanDemme directed the video, which made it onto ''Television/SaturdayNightLive''.''Series/SaturdayNightLive''.


* Music/BlueOysterCult's "(Don't Fear) The Reaper" (1976) deals with death and afterlife itself and touches on the story of RomeoAndJuliet (who were both fifteen in Shakespeare's play).

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* Music/BlueOysterCult's "(Don't Fear) The Reaper" (1976) deals with death and afterlife itself and touches on the story of RomeoAndJuliet Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet (who were both fifteen in Shakespeare's play).

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* Music/ThinLizzy "Mexican Girl". It's never actually said what killed her but it's rather obvious a ricochet from the shootout her boyfriend is involved in.


Teenage Death Songs are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin songs about dead or dying teenagers]]. Also called "death rock" (not to be confused with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathrock music genre of the same name]]) or "teen tragedy" songs, these were a staple of pop music in TheFifties and early [[TheSixties Sixties]], when RockAndRoll was very much a teenage phenonemon, but they are still written occasionally today. Most, if not all, are {{Glurge}} staples and often examples of pure unadulterated {{Narm}}.

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Teenage Death Songs are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin songs about dead or dying teenagers]]. Also called "death rock" (not to be confused with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathrock music genre of the same name]]) or "teen tragedy" songs, these were a staple of pop music in TheFifties and early [[TheSixties Sixties]], when RockAndRoll was very much a teenage phenonemon, but they are still written occasionally today. Most, if not all, are {{Glurge}} staples and often examples of pure unadulterated {{Narm}}.\n


-->When we met, she was fifteen\\

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-->When we they met, she was fifteen\\

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* "Passage" by Music/ViennaTeng starts with the line "I died in a car crash" and has the singer narrate the lives of her family following her fatal accident.

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* "Bat Out Of Hell"


* "Nightmare" by The Whyte Boots (1967). The protagonist fights another girl who stole her boyfriend and accidental death results.

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* "Nightmare" by The the Whyte Boots (1967). The protagonist fights another girl who stole her boyfriend and accidental death results.



* DoubleSubverted on "Leah", by Roy Orbison (1962). The protagonist dives to fish pearls for her girlfriend, gets stuck and gets drowned. On the last verse [[spoiler:it is revealed it was just awful nightmare. The lyrics imply Leah actually was the one who was drowned long ago.]]

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* DoubleSubverted on "Leah", by Roy Orbison (1962). The protagonist dives to fish pearls for her his girlfriend, gets stuck and gets drowned. On the last verse [[spoiler:it is revealed it was just awful nightmare. The lyrics imply Leah actually was the one who was drowned long ago.]]


* "Teen Angel" by Mark Dinning (1959): Bob sings about Alice's death when his car stalled on the RailroadTracksOfDoom: after removing his ring during a fight, she got out when the car stopped but went back for the ring. (Thats right, she collects a Website/DarwinAward and he lives to sing about it.) Ironically intended as a parody of the genre, this ended up being one of its signature tunes.

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* "Teen Angel" by Mark Dinning (1959): Bob sings about Alice's death when his car stalled on the RailroadTracksOfDoom: after removing his ring during a fight, she got out when the car stopped but went back for the ring. (Thats (That's right, she collects a Website/DarwinAward Website/{{Darwin Award|s}} and he lives to sing about it.) Ironically intended Intended as a parody of the genre, this ended ironically wound up being becoming one of its signature tunes.


* "Space Junk" by Devo (1978). This is an outright bizarre story. A Soviet satellite falls off the orbit and disintegrates. Some of the debris hits the protagonist's girlfriend, who gets killed.

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* "Space Junk" by Devo (1978). This is Music/{{Devo}} (1978) depicts an outright bizarre story. A story: a Soviet satellite falls off the out of orbit and disintegrates. Some of the debris hits the protagonist's girlfriend, who gets killed.


* Another Dickey Lee song, "Laurie (Strange Things Happen)" (1965) sort of combines this with BewareOfHitchhikingGhosts. It was written by a psychologist, Dr. Milton Addington, based on a newspaper story written by Cathie Harmon, age 15. They split the royalties.

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* Another Dickey Lee song, Lee's "Laurie (Strange Things Happen)" (1965) sort of combines this with BewareOfHitchhikingGhosts. It was written by a psychologist, Dr. Milton Addington, based on a newspaper story written by Cathie Harmon, age 15. They split the royalties.


A Teenage Death Song is a song about dead or dying teenagers. Also called "death rock" (not to be confused with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathrock music genre of the same name]]) or "teen tragedy" songs, these were a staple of pop music in TheFifties and early [[TheSixties Sixties]], when RockAndRoll was very much a teenage phenonemon, but they are still written occasionally today. Most, if not all, are {{Glurge}} staples and often examples of pure unadulterated {{Narm}}.

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A Teenage Death Song is a song Songs are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin songs about dead or dying teenagers.teenagers]]. Also called "death rock" (not to be confused with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathrock music genre of the same name]]) or "teen tragedy" songs, these were a staple of pop music in TheFifties and early [[TheSixties Sixties]], when RockAndRoll was very much a teenage phenonemon, but they are still written occasionally today. Most, if not all, are {{Glurge}} staples and often examples of pure unadulterated {{Narm}}.


A Teenage Death Song is a song about dead or dying teenagers. Also called "death rock" (not to be confused with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathrock music genre of the same name]]), they were a staple of pop music in TheFifties and early [[TheSixties Sixties]], when RockAndRoll was very much a teenage phenonemon, but they are still written occasionally today. Most, if not all, are {{Glurge}} staples and often examples of pure unadulterated {{Narm}}.

to:

A Teenage Death Song is a song about dead or dying teenagers. Also called "death rock" (not to be confused with the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathrock music genre of the same name]]), they name]]) or "teen tragedy" songs, these were a staple of pop music in TheFifties and early [[TheSixties Sixties]], when RockAndRoll was very much a teenage phenonemon, but they are still written occasionally today. Most, if not all, are {{Glurge}} staples and often examples of pure unadulterated {{Narm}}.


Often a romantic tragedy written from the point-of-view of the dead teen's girlfriend or boyfriend, but sometimes are written as if the dying (or even dead) teen is singing himself. A more bittersweet variation might end with a pair of teen lovers TogetherInDeath. Often, but not always, there are also parents who are sorry they weren't more understanding. Usually a MoralityBallad, and if homicide is involved a MurderBallad as well.

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Often a romantic tragedy written from the point-of-view of the dead teen's girlfriend or boyfriend, but sometimes are written as if the dying (or even dead) teen is singing himself. A more bittersweet variation might end with a pair of teen lovers TogetherInDeath. Often, but not always, there are also parents who are sorry they weren't more understanding. Usually a MoralityBallad, and if homicide is involved a MurderBallad as well.



[[http://www.nyx.net/~anon52ea/DeadTeenSongs.html This website]] is dedicated to Teenage Death songs.

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[[http://www.nyx.net/~anon52ea/DeadTeenSongs.html This website]] is dedicated to Teenage Death songs.
Songs.

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* "Nightmare" by The Whyte Boots (1967). The protagonist fights another girl who stole her boyfriend and accidental death results.

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