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** A common question raised by Broadway.com message board members who saw this show was why, when the {{Retool}] incorporated [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory many of the 1971 film adaptation's songs]], "Cheer Up Charlie" -- also fitting this trope -- wasn't given to Mrs. Bucket instead.

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** A common question raised by Broadway.com message board members who saw this show was why, when the {{Retool}] retool incorporated [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory many of the 1971 film adaptation's songs]], "Cheer Up Charlie" -- also fitting this trope -- wasn't given to Mrs. Bucket instead.



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* "If Your Father Were Here" is this for Mrs. Bucket in the Broadway {{Retool}} of ''Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' -- while the West End original's "If Your Mother Were Here" also didn't have much bearing on the plot beyond refocusing attention on Charlie after four consecutive songs about the Bratty Kids, it was a duet for Mr. and Mrs. Bucket (who otherwise get minor parts in two group numbers). In the Broadway version, Mr. Bucket suffered DeathByAdaptation in the {{Backstory}} and Mrs. Bucket disappears after Act One.
** A common question raised by Broadway.com message board members who saw this show was why, when the {{Retool}] incorporated [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory many of the 1971 film adaptation's songs]], "Cheer Up Charlie" -- also fitting this trope -- wasn't given to Mrs. Bucket instead.


* "Another Suitcase in Another Hall" from the stage production of ''{{Evita}}'', sung by Juan Peron's lover prior to Evita, who has no real role in the play other than to be unceremoniously kicked out by Evita. (In the movie, the song is sung by Evita herself.)

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* "Another Suitcase in Another Hall" from the stage production of ''{{Evita}}'', ''Theatre/{{Evita}}'', sung by Juan Peron's lover prior to Evita, who has no real role in the play other than to be unceremoniously kicked out by Evita. (In the movie, the song is sung by Evita herself.)


* “Sandy” in ''{{Film/Grease}}'' is Creator/JohnTravolta’s only solo, as [[LetsDuet he shares his other songs]] with Olivia Newton-John ([[DistantDuet “Summer Nights,”]] “You’re the One that I Want”) and Jeff Conway (“Grease Lightning”). Yet, the song was written to [[FollowTheLeader capitalize on]] the TheSeventies trend of songs named after young women (such as [[BarryManilow “Mandy”]]).

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* “Sandy” in ''{{Film/Grease}}'' is Creator/JohnTravolta’s only solo, as [[LetsDuet he shares his other songs]] with Olivia Newton-John ([[DistantDuet “Summer Nights,”]] “You’re the One that I Want”) and Jeff Conway (“Grease Lightning”). Yet, the song was written to [[FollowTheLeader capitalize on]] the TheSeventies trend of songs named after young women (such as [[BarryManilow [[Music/BarryManilow “Mandy”]]).


* Really the only explanation for "Shipoopi" in ''TheMusicMan'', The song appears to just be an excuse for Marcellus to sing and dance (in-story, it serves as a distraction, but the song itself is still '''bizarre''').

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* Really the only explanation for "Shipoopi" in ''TheMusicMan'', ''Theatre/TheMusicMan'', The song appears to just be an excuse for Marcellus to sing and dance (in-story, it serves as a distraction, but the song itself is still '''bizarre''').


* “Sandy” in ''{{Film/Grease}}'' is JohnTravolta’s only solo, as [[LetsDuet he shares his other songs]] with Olivia Newton-John ([[DistantDuet “Summer Nights,”]] “You’re the One that I Want”) and Jeff Conway (“Grease Lightning”). Yet, the song was written to [[FollowTheLeader capitalize on]] the TheSeventies trend of songs named after young women (such as [[BarryManilow “Mandy”]]).

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* “Sandy” in ''{{Film/Grease}}'' is JohnTravolta’s Creator/JohnTravolta’s only solo, as [[LetsDuet he shares his other songs]] with Olivia Newton-John ([[DistantDuet “Summer Nights,”]] “You’re the One that I Want”) and Jeff Conway (“Grease Lightning”). Yet, the song was written to [[FollowTheLeader capitalize on]] the TheSeventies trend of songs named after young women (such as [[BarryManilow “Mandy”]]).


* When FrankSinatra played Nathan Detroit in the movie version of ''Theatre/GuysAndDolls'', it was not enough for him to be half of the "Sue Me" duet and add his voice to the title number (which might have happened in the original production if Sam Levene hadn't been a non-singer). Therefore, the rather bland MovieBonusSong "Adelaide" was written for him.

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* When FrankSinatra Music/FrankSinatra played Nathan Detroit in the movie version of ''Theatre/GuysAndDolls'', it was not enough for him to be half of the "Sue Me" duet and add his voice to the title number (which might have happened in the original production if Sam Levene hadn't been a non-singer). Therefore, the rather bland MovieBonusSong "Adelaide" was written for him.


* The song "The Morning Report" in ''Disney/TheLionKing''; it's blatantly there just to give Zazu more singing time, and is little more than a HurricaneOfPuns. To add insult to injury, Zazu doesn't even get to finish the song - ''Simba'' butts in and finishes it, for him, completely invalidating the reason for giving him the song to sing, in the first place.

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* The song "The Morning Report" in ''Disney/TheLionKing''; ''Disney/TheLionKing'' 2003 Special Edition; it's blatantly there just to give Zazu more singing time, and is little more than a HurricaneOfPuns. To add insult to injury, Zazu doesn't even get to finish the song - ''Simba'' butts in and finishes it, for him, completely invalidating the reason for giving him the song to sing, in the first place.


* ''[[Literature/AuntieMame Mame]]'' adds a MovieBonusSong to its 1974 film adaptation, "Loving You", solely to give third-billed Robert Preston's Beauregarde a solo and a little more screen time; his character only appears in the middle stretch of the story and dies offscreen not long after this song.

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* ''[[Literature/AuntieMame Mame]]'' adds a MovieBonusSong to its 1974 film adaptation, "Loving You", solely to give third-billed Robert Preston's Beauregarde a solo and a little more screen time; his character only appears in the middle stretch of the story and dies offscreen not long shortly after this song.


* ''[[Literature/AuntieMame Mame]]'' adds a MovieBonusSong to its 1974 film adaptation, "Loving You", solely to give third-billed Robert Preston's Beauregarde a solo (the only song he has in the stage show is the title number, which becomes a full-cast showstopper) and a little more screen time; his character only appears in the middle stretch of the story and dies offscreen not long after this song.

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* ''[[Literature/AuntieMame Mame]]'' adds a MovieBonusSong to its 1974 film adaptation, "Loving You", solely to give third-billed Robert Preston's Beauregarde a solo (the only song he has in the stage show is the title number, which becomes a full-cast showstopper) and a little more screen time; his character only appears in the middle stretch of the story and dies offscreen not long after this song.



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* ''[[Literature/AuntieMame Mame]]'' adds a MovieBonusSong to its 1974 film adaptation, "Loving You", solely to give third-billed Robert Preston's Beauregarde a solo (the only song he has in the stage show is the title number, which becomes a full-cast showstopper) and a little more screen time; his character only appears in the middle stretch of the story and dies offscreen not long after this song.


* In ''The Rocky Horror Show'', Brad's song "Once In A While" originally existed solely because Brad was the only [[{{Pun}} major]] character without his own song. Not all productions included it, as it was often considered the weakest in the show; it was also cut from [[TheRockyHorrorPictureShow the film]].

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* In ''The Rocky Horror Show'', Brad's song "Once In A While" originally existed solely because Brad was the only [[{{Pun}} major]] character without his own song. Not all productions included it, as it was often considered the weakest in the show; it was also cut from [[TheRockyHorrorPictureShow [[Film/TheRockyHorrorPictureShow the film]].



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* In ''The Rocky Horror Show'', Brad's song "Once In A While" originally existed solely because Brad was the only major character without his own song. Not all productions included it, as it was often considered the weakest in the show; it was also cut from [[TheRockyHorrorPictureShow the film]].

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* In ''The Rocky Horror Show'', Brad's song "Once In A While" originally existed solely because Brad was the only major [[{{Pun}} major]] character without his own song. Not all productions included it, as it was often considered the weakest in the show; it was also cut from [[TheRockyHorrorPictureShow the film]].


* The 1994 Broadway revival of ''ShowBoat'' reassigned "Why Do I Love You?" to Parthy, who had to sing if played by Elaine Stritch. Parthy sings it to Magnolia's newborn daughter; that the song was originally a boy/girl duet is poorly camouflaged.

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* The 1994 Broadway revival of ''ShowBoat'' ''Theatre/ShowBoat'' reassigned "Why Do I Love You?" to Parthy, who had to sing if played by Elaine Stritch. Parthy sings it to Magnolia's newborn daughter; that the song was originally a boy/girl duet is poorly camouflaged.


** “Beauty School Dropout” may also count, as the song adds nothing to the plot.

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** “Beauty School Dropout” may also count, as the song adds nothing to the plot.
plot, and seems to exist purely for the sake of "Look! It's Frankie Avalon!"

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