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* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout [[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630 to his family]]

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* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier TropeCodifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout [[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630 to his family]]


* ''Franchise/DanganRonpa:''
** Sakura Ogami's death in ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' turns out to have been a suicide; the victim had just admitted she was blackmailed into being TheMole, and she knew her continued presence was a ticking time bomb that would eventually get someone killed. So she locked herself in a room and drank some poison. Unfortunately for the player, Monokuma tampers with the suicide note, leading [[spoiler:Aoi Asahina]] to believe she did what she did out of despair and try to cover up the suicide to get everyone killed.

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* ''Franchise/DanganRonpa:''
''Franchise/{{Danganronpa}}'':
** Sakura Ogami's death in ''VisualNovel/DanganRonpa'' ''VisualNovel/DanganronpaTriggerHappyHavoc'' turns out to have been a suicide; the victim had just admitted she was blackmailed into being TheMole, and she knew her continued presence was a ticking time bomb that would eventually get someone killed. So she locked herself in a room and drank some poison. Unfortunately for the player, Monokuma tampers with the suicide note, leading [[spoiler:Aoi Asahina]] to believe she did what she did out of despair and try to cover up the suicide to get everyone killed.


* Inverted in ''Fanfic/WhereTalentGoesToDie''. The fifth murder victim is found drowned in the baths, and some suspect that it was a suicide, but there are a number of points indicating that it was murder- the victim's arms and legs were bound, there was a chloroform-soaked rag near the scene, and the victim, being a Christian, believed that committing suicide would send her to Hell. It ultimately turns out that the victim allowed the killer to kill her, since Monokuma was threatening to harm the students' families if a murder didn't occur soon.



** Nagito Komaeda's death in ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'' turns out to be a subversion: which is to say, it was a murder, that looked like a suicide, that looked like a murder. Details as follows: He had a number of knife wounds and a spear sticking out of him. All these were self-inflicted in an elaborate way to make it look like they weren't, but he didn't die of injury. He actually tricked one of the students into poisoning him.

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** Nagito Komaeda's death in ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'' turns out to be a subversion: which is to say, it was a murder, that looked like a suicide, that looked like a murder. Details as follows: He had a number of knife wounds and a spear sticking out of him. All these were self-inflicted in an elaborate way to make it look like they weren't, but he didn't die of injury. He actually tricked one of the students into poisoning him.him, so that whether he died of the poison or by dropping the spear (as a result of being poisoned), said student would become the murderer.


* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout to [[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630 to his family]]

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* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout to [[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630 to his family]]


* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout to his family.[[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630]]

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* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout to his family.[[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630]]org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630 to his family]]



* Attempted by Thomas G. Doty when he blew up an airplane[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_Airlines_Flight_11]]. Facing charges of armed robbery he decided to purchase a number of generous life insurance policies along with a bundle of dynamite, which he detonated in the lavatory. Unfortunately for his family, when his plot was uncovered the insurance companies denied their attempts to collect a payout, [[EpicFail giving them only a 3$ refund]].
* A case report[[https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jeffrey_Barnard/publication/13622995_A_Suicide_Disguised_as_a_Homicide_Return_to_Thor_Bridge/links/5c1819ff92851c39ebf52424/A-Suicide-Disguised-as-a-Homicide-Return-to-Thor-Bridge.pdf]] describes an attempt to try this using a method similar to the one described in A Return to Thorn Bridge. Unfortunately for the man the rope wound up getting caught on a drainage opening, causing police to realize what had happened.

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* Attempted by Thomas G. Doty when he blew up an airplane[[https://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_Airlines_Flight_11]].org/wiki/Continental_Airlines_Flight_11 an airplane]]. Facing charges of armed robbery he decided to purchase a number of generous life insurance policies along with a bundle of dynamite, which he detonated in the lavatory. Unfortunately for his family, when his plot was uncovered the insurance companies denied their attempts to collect a payout, [[EpicFail giving them only a 3$ refund]].
* A case report[[https://www.[[https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jeffrey_Barnard/publication/13622995_A_Suicide_Disguised_as_a_Homicide_Return_to_Thor_Bridge/links/5c1819ff92851c39ebf52424/A-Suicide-Disguised-as-a-Homicide-Return-to-Thor-Bridge.pdf]] pdf case report]] describes an attempt to try this using a method similar to the one described in A Return to Thorn Bridge. Unfortunately for the man the rope wound up getting caught on a drainage opening, causing police to realize what had happened.


* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout to his family.

to:

* It's believed that Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was based on an incident described in the homicide investigation handbook of criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of providing a life insurance payout to his family.[[https://archive.org/details/criminalinvestig00grosuoft/page/630]]


* It's claimed in several secondary works on the Holmes mythos that the famous example in "Thor Bridge" was directly based on an actual suicide somewhere in Germany or Austro-Hungary, where a person shot themselves in exactly the same kind of location and using the same method of disposing of the gun, in order to frame an enemy for murder. None of the sources give enough detail to verify this, though.

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* It's claimed in several secondary works on the Holmes mythos believed that the famous example in "Thor Bridge" Arthur Conan Doyle's Trope codifier was directly based on an actual suicide somewhere incident described in Germany or Austro-Hungary, where a person shot themselves in exactly the same kind homicide investigation handbook of location and using the same method criminalist Tom Gross, in which an Austrian grain merchant in serious debt attempted this in hopes of disposing of the gun, in order providing a life insurance payout to frame an enemy for murder. None of the sources give enough detail to verify this, though.his family.

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* A case report[[https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jeffrey_Barnard/publication/13622995_A_Suicide_Disguised_as_a_Homicide_Return_to_Thor_Bridge/links/5c1819ff92851c39ebf52424/A-Suicide-Disguised-as-a-Homicide-Return-to-Thor-Bridge.pdf]] describes an attempt to try this using a method similar to the one described in A Return to Thorn Bridge. Unfortunately for the man the rope wound up getting caught on a drainage opening, causing police to realize what had happened.

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* Attempted by Thomas G. Doty when he blew up an airplane[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_Airlines_Flight_11]]. Facing charges of armed robbery he decided to purchase a number of generous life insurance policies along with a bundle of dynamite, which he detonated in the lavatory. Unfortunately for his family, when his plot was uncovered the insurance companies denied their attempts to collect a payout, [[EpicFail giving them only a 3$ refund]].

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* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'' has an interesting play on this when Myndi Mayer commits suicide and is subsequently shot by a man intending to kill her without realizing she was already dead. It takes a while for the whole of the story to be revealed, and the fact that she was already dead before being shot is learned before the motives of her shooter.

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** In yet another episode, this becomes clear towards the end of the episode. ''Unlike'' the above examples, [[spoiler: the person committing suicide wasn't involved with making it appear as if he'd been murdered. It was the victim's ''friends'' that arranged that when they found the body, in a bid to frame a faux-friend who was lying to and blackmailing the victim.]]


** An unhappy husband on ''Series/LawAndOrder'' framed his wife and her boyfriend. Awesomely pulled off, by the way. [[spoiler: He hired a hitman with an account of his wife's. Planted evidence that incriminated the two in the boyfriend's apartment and among wife's things. To pull all this off, however, he had to borrow money from his best friend. To make sure said friend wouldn't be caught up in his plot, he made a VideoWill in which the "victim" revealed that it was his plot. Then the "victim" has a good laugh about it.]]

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** An unhappy husband on ''Series/LawAndOrder'' framed his wife and her boyfriend. Awesomely pulled off, by the way. [[spoiler: He hired a hitman with an account of his wife's. Planted evidence that incriminated the two in the boyfriend's apartment and among the wife's things. To pull all this off, however, he had to borrow money from his best friend. To make sure said friend wouldn't be caught up in his plot, he made a VideoWill in which the "victim" revealed that it was his plot. Then the "victim" has a good laugh about it.]]



*** In another episode, a young mother with severe, untreated post-partum depression blows up her car to kill herself and her children. She never specifically says she meant for it to look like murder, but it's mentioned that she rejected another method (carbon monoxide poisoning by intentionally breaking a space heater) because people would know what she had done, implying she wanted people to think someone besides her was responsible.

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*** In another episode, a young mother with severe, untreated post-partum postpartum depression blows up her car to kill herself and her children. She never specifically says she meant for it to look like murder, but it's mentioned that she rejected another method (carbon monoxide poisoning by intentionally breaking a space heater) because people would know what she had done, implying she wanted people to think someone besides her was responsible.

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* ''Series/CrossingLines'': In "Enemy of the People" the victim at first appears to have been thrown out a window. It turns out he was {{blackmail}}ed though, and killed himself to expose the people behind this by making his death appear to be murder, along with insuring his family got the life insurance (as most policies do not pay out for a suicide).


** In a rather tragic instance, [[spoiler: an IllGirl [[StuffBlowingUp blows herself and her car up]] when she finds out that [[SurpriseIncest her fiancé was her long-lost twin brother]]. Bad thing, the fiancé was in the restaurant in whose parking lot she killed herself ''and'' both of them had suspected one another of [[YourCheatingHeart cheating]], so he was immediately accused of murdering her. Conan had to race against the clock to defuse the whole deal.]]


In shows when it is AlwaysMurder and NeverSuicide this can crop up as the rare exception. Can also cover instances where you hire an assassin to kill yourself. Sometimes the idea isn't to frame someone in particular, just to cover up the suicide as part of an InsuranceFraud, since death-by-suicide usually isn't covered. Occasionally a suicide will be covered up by a second party who wants to protect the deceased's reputation. Exists at the intersection of WoundedGazelleGambit and MyDeathIsJustTheBeginning. Sometimes, but not always, a sub-trope of ThanatosGambit. The character may be pulling off this trope in order to avoid the [[SuicideIsShameful stigmatization of suicide.]]

Compare and contrast MakeItLookLikeAnAccident and SuicideNotAccident. Similar to but distinct from TakingYouWithMe; that trope is more of a last resort for when you were going to die anyway.

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In Often played as a refreshing subversion in shows when it is AlwaysMurder and where NeverSuicide this can crop up as is the rare exception. Can also cover instances where you hire an assassin to kill yourself. norm. Sometimes the idea isn't to frame someone in particular, just but to cover up the suicide as murder anyway, e.g. as part of an InsuranceFraud, since death-by-suicide usually isn't covered. InsuranceFraud or in order to avoid the [[SuicideIsShameful stigmatization of suicide.]] Occasionally a suicide will be covered up by a second party who wants to protect the deceased's reputation.reputation.

Sister trope of SuicideNotAccident where instead of murder, the suicide is made to look like an accident. Also see SuicideByAssassin for instances where you hire someone to kill yourself.
Exists at the intersection of WoundedGazelleGambit and MyDeathIsJustTheBeginning. Sometimes, but not always, a sub-trope of ThanatosGambit. The character may be pulling off this trope in order to avoid the [[SuicideIsShameful stigmatization of suicide.]]\n\nCompare and contrast MakeItLookLikeAnAccident and SuicideNotAccident. Similar to but distinct from TakingYouWithMe; that trope is more of a last resort for when you were going to die anyway.

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