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* ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': During the show's various tournaments, if there is a tie after Final Jeopardy!, a single tiebreaker clue is played. The first player to buzz in with the correct response wins. If no one answers correctly, additional tiebreakers are used until someone does.
* On ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'', ties were broken by playing another round of seven words. The team who caused the tie was given the choice of two letters, each of which would be the first letter of every correct response in the tiebreaker round. Originally, they were just played until one team finally outscored the other, but after many instances of both teams going 7/7 in tiebreaker rounds, it was changed in TheEighties so that whichever team got their 7 words faster was declared the winner. (However, on at least one episode, they had to play ''three'' tiebreakers in the first half due to both teams only getting 6 words right on their first two attempts, while another had to do a double-tiebreaker due to both teams getting the seventh word in the first tiebreaker round on the buzzer.)

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* ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': During the show's various tournaments, if If there is a tie after Final Jeopardy!, a single tiebreaker clue is played. The first player to buzz in with the correct response wins. If no one answers correctly, additional tiebreakers are used until someone does.
* ''Series/{{Blackout}}'' had a tiebreaker word that was played if both teams were tied after two rounds. The team that had correctly guessed more words during the first two rounds (or the winner of a backstage coin toss if there was a tie) chose to either play the word or pass to the opponents. The contestant giving clues had 10 seconds to describe the word for his/her partner, and the opposing contestant had three seconds of blackout time, with the same repetition penalty as in the one first two rounds. A correct guess won the game, while a miss gave the win to the opposing team.
* On ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'', ties were broken by playing another round of seven words. The team who caused the tie was given the choice of two letters, each of which would be the first letter of every correct response in the tiebreaker round. Originally, they were just played until one team finally outscored the other, but after many instances of both teams going 7/7 in tiebreaker rounds, it was changed in TheEighties so that whichever team got their 7 words faster was declared the winner. (However, on at least one episode, they had to play ''three'' tiebreakers in the first half due to both teams only getting 6 words right on their first two attempts, while another had to do a double-tiebreaker due to both teams getting the seventh word in the first tiebreaker round on the buzzer.)) Since 2016, the tiebreaker is only used in the event that both teams took the same amount of time to provide all of their correct responses.
* ''Series/{{Duel}}'': On the American version, if both contestants answered a question incorrectly or, during the show's second season, there was no winner after 10 question, a sudden-death tiebreaker question was played. Contestants received four chips and the winner is the first to have the correct answer while using the fewest amount of chips. If both contestants got the correct answer while using the same amount of chips, the procedure was repeated until there was a winner. If no one answered the question correctly, both contestants were eliminated.


* In UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}, the US Open between 1970 and 1974 implemented a sudden-death tie-breaker in which the first player to reach five points won the set. Since then, the US Open and most other associations have used a "lingering death" tie-breaker at 6-6 in which the first to at least seven points with at least a two-point lead is needed to win the set. Note that many tournaments (including the French Open) won't use the tiebreaker for the final set, requiring a clear winner by at least two games. Starting from 2019, the Australian open will use a tiebreaker to ten points instead of the standard seven, and Wimbledon will use the standard seven point tiebreaker for the final set if it reaches 12-12 instead of 6-6.

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* In UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}, the US Open between 1970 and 1974 implemented a sudden-death tie-breaker in which the first player to reach five points won the set. Since then, the US Open and most other associations have used a "lingering death" tie-breaker at 6-6 in which the first to at least seven points with at least a two-point lead is needed to win the set. Note that many tournaments (including the French Open) won't use the tiebreaker for the final set, requiring a clear winner by at least two games. Starting from 2019, the Australian open will use a tiebreaker to ten points instead of the standard seven, and Wimbledon will use the standard seven point tiebreaker for the final set if it reaches 12-12 instead of 6-6.
6-6. The French Open is the last remaining Grand Slam event to not use a tiebreaker for the final set.


* In UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}, the US Open between 1970 and 1974 implemented a sudden-death tie-breaker in which the first player to reach five points won the set. Since then, the US Open and most other associations have used a "lingering death" tie-breaker in which at least a two-point lead is needed to win. Note that many tournaments (including two of the four Grand Slam events: the Australian and French Opens) won't use the tiebreaker for the final set, requiring a clear winner by at least two games. Starting from 2019, Wimbledon will also use a sudden death tiebreaker for the final set if it reaches 12-12.

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* In UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}, the US Open between 1970 and 1974 implemented a sudden-death tie-breaker in which the first player to reach five points won the set. Since then, the US Open and most other associations have used a "lingering death" tie-breaker at 6-6 in which the first to at least seven points with at least a two-point lead is needed to win. win the set. Note that many tournaments (including two of the four Grand Slam events: the Australian and French Opens) Open) won't use the tiebreaker for the final set, requiring a clear winner by at least two games. Starting from 2019, the Australian open will use a tiebreaker to ten points instead of the standard seven, and Wimbledon will also use a sudden death the standard seven point tiebreaker for the final set if it reaches 12-12.
12-12 instead of 6-6.


* In UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}, the US Open between 1970 and 1974 implemented a sudden-death tie-breaker in which the first player to reach five points won the set. Since then, the US Open and most other associations have used a "lingering death" tie-breaker in which at least a two-point lead is needed to win. Note that many tournaments won't use the tiebreaker for the final set, requiring a clear winner by at least two games. (Of the four Grand Slam events, only the US Open uses final-set tiebreakers.)

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* In UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}, the US Open between 1970 and 1974 implemented a sudden-death tie-breaker in which the first player to reach five points won the set. Since then, the US Open and most other associations have used a "lingering death" tie-breaker in which at least a two-point lead is needed to win. Note that many tournaments (including two of the four Grand Slam events: the Australian and French Opens) won't use the tiebreaker for the final set, requiring a clear winner by at least two games. (Of Starting from 2019, Wimbledon will also use a sudden death tiebreaker for the four Grand Slam events, only the US Open uses final-set tiebreakers.)
final set if it reaches 12-12.


* In the first season of ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}''[='=]s Competitive Mode, if four rounds of Assault, Escort, or Hybrid[[note]]Each pair of rounds corresponds to one round of team A attacking and then one round of team B attacking. To borrow from baseball or cricket terminology, it's basically two "innings"[[/note]] passed without a winner being declared, the game would go into Sudden Death: a coin was flipped, and the side it landed on determined which team would get 1 minute to fulfill a quick objective (such as capturing the first objective of two or escorting the payload to its first checkpoint); if they succeeded, they won, and if they couldn't, the defending team won without having to play another attacking round. However, this created balancing issues, since some maps are shown to favor one side or the other effectively making Sudden Death a LuckBasedMission, so Season 2 scrapped it in favor of simply declaring a draw if neither team has won after four rounds.[[/folder]]

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* In the first season of ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}''[='=]s Competitive Mode, if four rounds of Assault, Escort, or Hybrid[[note]]Each pair of rounds corresponds to one round of team A attacking and then one round of team B attacking. To borrow from baseball or cricket terminology, it's basically two "innings"[[/note]] passed without a winner being declared, the game would go into Sudden Death: a coin was flipped, and the side it landed on determined which team would get 1 minute to fulfill a quick objective (such as capturing the first objective of two or escorting the payload to its first checkpoint); if they succeeded, they won, and if they couldn't, the defending team won without having to play another attacking round. However, this created balancing issues, since some maps are shown to favor one side or the other effectively making Sudden Death a LuckBasedMission, so Season 2 scrapped it in favor of simply declaring a draw if neither team has won after four rounds.[[/folder]]


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* In the VideoGame/HeadSports series, if a match ends in a tie after the time is up, the Power Shot gauges will freeze as the game enters "Sudden Death" or "Double KO" (in VideoGame/HeadBoxing), which ends as soon as one point is scored.


* In the first season of ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}''[='=]s Competitive Mode, if four rounds of Assault, Escort, or Hybrid[[note]]Each pair of rounds corresponds to one round of team A attacking and then one round of team B attacking. To borrow from baseball or cricket terminology, it's basically two "innings"[[/note]] passed without a winner being declared, the game would go into Sudden Death: a coin was flipped, and the side it landed on determined which team would get 1 minute to fulfill a quick objective (such as capturing the first objective of two or escorting the payload to its first checkpoint); if they succeeded, they won, and if they couldn't, the defending team won without having to play another attacking round. This was shelved in season 2 onwards in favor of just declaring a draw if there's still no victor after four rounds.
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* In the first season of ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}''[='=]s Competitive Mode, if four rounds of Assault, Escort, or Hybrid[[note]]Each pair of rounds corresponds to one round of team A attacking and then one round of team B attacking. To borrow from baseball or cricket terminology, it's basically two "innings"[[/note]] passed without a winner being declared, the game would go into Sudden Death: a coin was flipped, and the side it landed on determined which team would get 1 minute to fulfill a quick objective (such as capturing the first objective of two or escorting the payload to its first checkpoint); if they succeeded, they won, and if they couldn't, the defending team won without having to play another attacking round. This was shelved in season However, this created balancing issues, since some maps are shown to favor one side or the other effectively making Sudden Death a LuckBasedMission, so Season 2 onwards scrapped it in favor of just simply declaring a draw if there's still no victor neither team has won after four rounds.
rounds.[[/folder]]

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* In the first season of ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}''[='=]s Competitive Mode, if four rounds of Assault, Escort, or Hybrid[[note]]Each pair of rounds corresponds to one round of team A attacking and then one round of team B attacking. To borrow from baseball or cricket terminology, it's basically two "innings"[[/note]] passed without a winner being declared, the game would go into Sudden Death: a coin was flipped, and the side it landed on determined which team would get 1 minute to fulfill a quick objective (such as capturing the first objective of two or escorting the payload to its first checkpoint); if they succeeded, they won, and if they couldn't, the defending team won without having to play another attacking round. This was shelved in season 2 onwards in favor of just declaring a draw if there's still no victor after four rounds.


In video games in particular, a common way to achieve this is to have an objective that can be accomplished in a matter of seconds, or [[RocketTagGameplay put all participants into critical health so that everyone kills and gets killed by each other very quickly]].

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In video games in particular, a common way to achieve this is to have an objective that can be accomplished in a matter of seconds, or [[RocketTagGameplay put all participants into critical health so that everyone kills and gets killed by each other very quickly]].
at the poke of a finger]].

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In video games in particular, a common way to achieve this is to have an objective that can be accomplished in a matter of seconds, or [[RocketTagGameplay put all participants into critical health so that everyone kills and gets killed by each other very quickly]].

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Fortnite}}''[='=]s Battle Royale mode, the Storm gradually covers more and more of the island, and anyone who gets caught in it continously takes damage, thus forcing players into a smaller play area and thus becoming more likely to encounter each other and engage in combat with one another. However, after the Storm pauses in its encroachment a certain number of times (i.e. if a match goes on significantly longer than usual), the Storm will just straight up cover the map completely, causing everyone to rapidly lose health no matter where they are, at which point the end of the match will certainly end in a matter of seconds.


A rule in sports games, GameShows[==] and VideoGames where an end-of-match tie is broken by playing a special round. As Sudden Death is intended to bring a swift conclusion to the contest, the victory conditions for this final round are usually highly abbreviated - scoring just one or two points is often enough to achieve victory.

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A rule in sports games, GameShows[==] sports, {{Game Show}}s and VideoGames where an end-of-match tie is broken by playing a special round. As Sudden Death is intended to bring a swift conclusion to the contest, the victory conditions for this final round are usually highly abbreviated - scoring just one or two points is often enough to achieve victory.
often, the first score wins the match.



** The NFL adopted new overtime rules for postseason games starting in 2010, and extended them to regular season games starting in 2012. If a team receives the opening kickoff and only scores a field goal, the game doesn't end until after the ensuing drive. A touchdown ends the game on the first possession, as does a safety. The game ends on the second possession with any result that is not still a tie. If the game is still tied after the first two possessions (either due to no scoring or matched field goals), the game reverts to sudden death. This rule was first used in the playoff game on Jan. 8, 2012 between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Denver Broncos, in which Denver scored on an 80-yard touchdown pass-and-run on the first play in overtime, meaning it took longer to announce the new overtime rules than to ''play it''.

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** The NFL adopted new overtime rules for postseason games starting in 2010, and extended them to regular season games starting in 2012. If a team receives the opening kickoff and only scores a field goal, the game doesn't end until after the ensuing drive. A touchdown ends the game on the first possession, instantly, as does a safety. The game ends on the second possession with any result that is not still a tie. If the game is still tied after the first two possessions (either due to no scoring or matched field goals), the game reverts goes to sudden death.death, usually labeled as "next score wins". This rule was first used in the playoff game on Jan. 8, 2012 between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Denver Broncos, in which Denver scored on an 80-yard touchdown pass-and-run on the first play in overtime, meaning it took longer to announce the new overtime rules than to ''play it''.



* If the score is tied after sixty minutes of regulation play during the regular season, the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL]] uses a five-minute sudden-death overtime period. Beginning with the 199899 season, the teams played four-on-four hockey (normally it's five-on-five, not counting goalies); starting in 201516, it changed to three-on-three. Should the game still be tied, teams go to a shootout (before 2005 it was just left as a tie). In the playoffs, though, teams skate five a side for an unlimited number of twenty-minute periods until someone scores, which can take a while (the record is six).

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* If the score is tied after sixty minutes of regulation play during the regular season, the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL]] uses a five-minute sudden-death overtime period. Beginning with the 199899 season, the teams played four-on-four hockey (normally it's five-on-five, not counting goalies); starting in 201516, it changed to three-on-three. Should the game still be tied, teams go to a shootout (before 2005 it was just left as a tie). In the playoffs, though, teams skate five a side for an unlimited number of twenty-minute periods until someone scores, which can take a while (the - the record is six).six overtime periods before someone scored.



* In the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series, in the event of a tie, rankings are decided by a round in which everybody has 300% damage. Last one to get knocked off the stage wins. If a Sudden Death match goes on for too long, [[StuffBlowingUp Bob-ombs start]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies raining from the sky]]. If by some freak occurrence another tie manages to occur, the player with the lower controller port number is declared the winner.

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* In the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series, in the event of a tie, rankings are decided by a round in which everybody has starts with 300% damage.damage and only one stock. Last one to get knocked off the stage wins. If a Sudden Death match goes on for too long, [[StuffBlowingUp Bob-ombs start]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies raining from the sky]]. If by some freak occurrence another tie manages to occur, the player with the lower lowest controller port number is declared the winner.


[[folder: Pinball]]
* If two or more players are tied in score at the end, and a winner is required, the standard is to play one more game, except with just one ball instead of the usual 3 or 5. Whoever's score is higher is the winner. If they're still tied, more one-ball games are played until their scores are different. The Pinburgh 2016 Finals is one case of this, with the three tied players on ''Pinball/IronManStern'' going again with a one-ball game.
[[/folder]]



* In UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball, the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_goal golden goal]]"[[note]]named as such due to being more politically correct than "sudden death"[[/note]] rule was implemented in 1993, where if the game is tied at the end of regulation time and there must be a winner, and extra time is played, the first team to score a goal during the extra time period would win; with a penalty shootout taking place if neither team scored after 30 minutes. In major tournaments like the FIFA World Cup, this replaced the original rule where the full 30 minutes would be played regardless of how many goals either side scored, with penalties if the score was still tied. A lesser form, silver goal, was later implemented in 2002, where a team that led after the first half of extra time won. Both were scrapped in 2004 due to leading to very defensive play, among other reasons.

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* In UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball, the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_goal golden goal]]"[[note]]named as such due to being more politically correct than "sudden death"[[/note]] rule was implemented in 1993, where if the game is tied at the end of regulation time and there must be a winner, and extra time is played, the first team to score a goal during the extra time period would win; with a penalty shootout taking place if neither team scored after 30 minutes. Said penalty shootout consists of five chances for both teams--if they're tied in the penalty shootout, additional chances are given for both teams until one team gets a goal in while the other does not. In major tournaments like the FIFA World Cup, this replaced the original rule where the full 30 minutes would be played regardless of how many goals either side scored, with penalties if the score was still tied. A lesser form, silver goal, was later implemented in 2002, where a team that led after the first half of extra time won. Both were scrapped in 2004 due to leading to very defensive play, among other reasons.


* In multiplayer modes other than Turf War and Clam Blitz in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'', sudden death will kick in after the end of the allotted time if the team behind on progress towards the objective has control of the objective when time's up. At that point, victory is either achieved should the team currently behind surpass the other team's progress (hold the zone for longer in Splat Zones; advance the payload further than the other team did in Tower Control or Rainmaker), or should the team behind lose control of the objective.

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* In multiplayer modes other than Turf War and Clam Blitz in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'', sudden death death, called Overtime, Pinch!, or Extra Time depending on the region, will kick in after the end of the allotted time if the team behind on progress towards the objective has control of the objective when time's up. At that point, victory is either achieved should the team currently behind surpass the other team's progress (hold the zone for longer in Splat Zones; advance the payload further than the other team did in Tower Control or Rainmaker), or should the team behind lose control of the objective. Clam Blitz, on the other hand, will have sudden death via the ''potential'' for scoring: In this mode, points are scored by tossing Power Clams into the goal on the opponents' side. If the losing team has any Power Clams, Overtime will begin and will only end when one of a number of conditions occur, one of them being that the losing team lose all of their Power Clams.



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* In multiplayer modes other than Turf War and Clam Blitz in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'', sudden death will kick in after the end of the allotted time if the team behind on progress towards the objective has control of the objective when time's up. At that point, victory is either achieved should the team currently behind surpass the other team's progress (hold the zone for longer in Splat Zones; advance the payload further than the other team did in Tower Control or Rainmaker), or should the team behind lose control of the objective.

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