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* ''Webcomic/TheInexplicableAdventuresOfBob'' has [[https://bobadventures.thecomicseries.com/files/images/VolTurnWeb.jpg Princess Voluptua.]] 'Nuff said.

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* ''Webcomic/TheInexplicableAdventuresOfBob'' has [[https://bobadventures.thecomicseries.com/files/images/VolTurnWeb.jpg Princess Voluptua.]] 'Nuff said.Princess]] [[https://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/images/VolBackWeb.jpg Voluptua,]] whose outfit is a thong-leotard with gloves and boots.


** Averted for both ComicBook/{{Mystique}} and ComicBook/{{Moira|MacTaggert}} in the final battle. They both wear the same jumpsuits as the others (though Moira's is grey).

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** Averted for both ComicBook/{{Mystique}} and ComicBook/{{Moira|MacTaggert}} [[Characters/XMenMutants Moira MacTaggert]] in the final battle. They both wear the same jumpsuits as the others (though Moira's is grey).


* {{Justified|Trope}} in Creator/WhiteWolf's ''TabletopGame/ScarredLands'' d20 System TabletopRPG: using arcane magic releases heat within the spellcaster's body, explaining the core rule systems ban on wizards using armor while also giving the caster the buff protection from cold with the side effect of making any heavy clothing really uncomfortable to wear. Some cultures embrace the skimpy garb this situation tends to require. Some wizards with more dignity slightly avoid the trope by wearing a loose robe over a more skimpy outfit, and simply doff the robe before a fight starts.
* ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]]'', of course.
** Many [[OurElvesAreDifferent Elves]] when they don't have to wear something more practical. Especially female Drow who seems to know only two sorts of clothes: quasi-magical chainmail plus cloak of near-invisibility and stunningly [[PimpedOutDress pimped out]] ''un''-dress.
** For most ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' elves clothes are only matter of convenience, at least when on their own (they tend to be uncomfortable with the sort of attention humans may display). ''[[Literature/TheElminsterSeries Elminster in Myth Drannor]]'' featured some elven ladies "dressed" in a handful of enchanted gems glued to the skin in artistic patterns.
** In 3.5 the Drow [[JustifiedTrope have an excuse]]: In their society, the more you cover up, the more flaws and weaknesses you're perceived to be compensating for, to the point where wealthy and powerful drow only really wear clothes as something to hang expensive finery from. ''Drow of the Underdark'' actually [[LampshadeHanging addresses]] this in depth. It's common for drow girls to expose a lot of skin due to the above and {{Fanservice}}, but considering most females in drow society can [[BarrierWarrior protect themselves with magic]], wearing a skimpy outfit is akin to announcing your spellcasting ability as well as confidence.
** The ''TabletopGame/DarkSun'' setting is made of this trope, for both males and females. Designers who'd worked on its initial development have openly admitted choosing a [[SingleBiomePlanet desert setting]] (as opposed to, for instance, an arctic one) because of the ample beef-and-cheesecake opportunities afforded by the artwork.
** [[CriticalResearchFailure Though in real deserts, people cover up to prevent dehydration and sunstroke]].
** The Gensai a 4th edition Player race: "To show off the energy lines etching his or her body, a genasi often wears clothes that leave at least some portion of his or her body uncovered." Yep, they've built Stripperiffic costumes into an entire race.
** A partial answer for all of this can be found in the D&D novel/module/CRPG "Curse of the Azure Bonds" and its sequels. Alias prefers to wear a chainmail bikini in lieu of proper armor because of the high-level enchantment on it; the skimpy mail has a higher AC then her platemail due to the enchantment. Magical armor can be less about actual armor and more about magical force fields with the strips of metal/leather serving as something to bind the magic to. Of course, this doesn't apply to nonmagical armor...
* JustifiedTrope with the sorcerer iconic Seoni from ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' by simple JustForFun/{{Troperithmetic}}: ArmorAndMagicDontMix + {{Downplayed|Trope}} VainSorceress = Stripperiffic outfit.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Fantasy Battles'' there are those that use it. Witch elves and sorceresses of the dark elves wear stripperiffic "clothes".
* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' has the Sisters Repentia, who wear little more than scraps of parchment covering key areas; and Dark Eldar Wytches, who are best described as wearing leather bikinis with armoured, high-heel boots. With the Sisters Repentia, it's justified by them being DeathSeeker|s, and with the Wytches it's justified by them being gladiatrices in Commorragh, the Milky Way's ultimate wretched hive of scum and villainy. Any Wytch who isn't sexually appealing enough for the crowds inevitably gets stuck in a HopelessBossFight at the arena.

to:

* {{Justified|Trope}} in Creator/WhiteWolf's ''TabletopGame/ScarredLands'' d20 System TabletopRPG: ''TabletopGame/ScarredLands'': {{Justified|Trope}}: using arcane magic releases heat within the spellcaster's body, explaining the core rule systems ban on wizards using armor while also giving the caster the buff protection from cold with the side effect of making any heavy clothing really uncomfortable to wear. Some cultures embrace the skimpy garb this situation tends to require. Some wizards with more dignity slightly avoid the trope by wearing a loose robe over a more skimpy outfit, and simply doff the robe before a fight starts.
* ''[[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]]'', of course.
''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** Many [[OurElvesAreDifferent Elves]] elves]] when they don't have to wear something more practical. Especially female Drow who seems to know only two sorts of clothes: quasi-magical chainmail plus cloak of near-invisibility and stunningly [[PimpedOutDress pimped out]] ''un''-dress.
** ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'': For most ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' elves clothes are only matter of convenience, at least when on their own (they tend to be uncomfortable with the sort of attention humans may display). ''[[Literature/TheElminsterSeries Elminster in Myth Drannor]]'' featured some elven ladies "dressed" in a handful of enchanted gems glued to the skin in artistic patterns.
** In 3.5 the Drow drow [[JustifiedTrope have an excuse]]: In their society, the more you cover up, the more flaws and weaknesses you're perceived to be compensating for, to the point where wealthy and powerful drow only really wear clothes as something to hang expensive finery from. ''Drow of the Underdark'' actually [[LampshadeHanging addresses]] this in depth. It's common for drow girls to expose a lot of skin due to the above and {{Fanservice}}, but considering most females in drow society can [[BarrierWarrior protect themselves with magic]], wearing a skimpy outfit is akin to announcing your spellcasting ability as well as confidence.
** The ''TabletopGame/DarkSun'' setting is made of this trope, for both males and females. Designers who'd worked on its initial development have openly admitted choosing a [[SingleBiomePlanet desert setting]] (as opposed to, for instance, an arctic one) because of the ample beef-and-cheesecake opportunities afforded by the artwork.
**
artwork. [[CriticalResearchFailure Though in real deserts, people cover up to prevent dehydration and sunstroke]].
** The Gensai a 4th edition Player race: "To Genasi, humanoids descended from elementals, often choose to leave parts of their bodies uncovered to show off the energy lines etching his or her body, a genasi often wears clothes that leave at least some portion of his or her body uncovered." Yep, they've built Stripperiffic costumes into an entire race.
their bodies.
** A partial answer for all of this can be found in the D&D ''D&D'' novel/module/CRPG "Curse of the Azure Bonds" and its sequels. Alias prefers to wear a chainmail bikini in lieu of proper armor because of the high-level enchantment on it; the skimpy mail has a higher AC then her platemail due to the enchantment. Magical armor can be less about actual armor and more about magical force fields with the strips of metal/leather serving as something to bind the magic to. Of course, this doesn't apply to nonmagical armor...
* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'': JustifiedTrope with the sorcerer iconic Seoni from ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' by simple JustForFun/{{Troperithmetic}}: ArmorAndMagicDontMix + {{Downplayed|Trope}} VainSorceress = Stripperiffic outfit.
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Fantasy Battles'' there are those that use it. Witch elves and sorceresses of the dark elves wear stripperiffic "clothes".
* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' has the Sisters Repentia, who wear little more than scraps of parchment covering key areas; and Dark Eldar Wytches, who are best described as wearing leather bikinis with armoured, high-heel boots. With the Sisters Repentia, it's justified by them being DeathSeeker|s, and with the Wytches it's justified by them being gladiatrices in Commorragh, the Milky Way's ultimate wretched hive of scum and villainy. Any Wytch who isn't sexually appealing enough for the crowds inevitably gets stuck in a HopelessBossFight at the arena.
''Franchise/{{Warhammer}}'':



* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' is occasionally guilty of this, especially when it regards ''[[OurAngelsAreDifferent angels]]''. The [[ProudWarriorRace Vulshok]] and [[NobleSavage Auriok]] seem to be explicitly forbidden from wearing more clothing than absolutely necessary.
** Mirrodin is generally the closest that Magic gets to a Stripperiffic setting, and even then it's somewhat [[PlayingWithATrope played with]]: most organic beings on the plane - including people - are born with substantial metallic inclusions as part of their bodies, so the dichotomy separating clothing from bare 'skin' isn't all that well-defined. (Does it count as nudity if you have a built-in ChainmailBikini?)
* ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' features quite a few characters who have no taste for pants, such as Harmonious Jade (long loincloth), Sulamore the Wan Stravophore (stripper bondage nun gear), and Thousand-Faceted Nelumbo (often depicted wearing nothing ''but'' shoulder pads, knee pads, and a cape). Of course, they're all Exalted of various stripes, which means they get access to Perfect Defenses, things that allow you to dodge, parry or withstand any attack even if you're naked and just holding a dessert fork.

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** ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyBattles'': Witch elves and sorceresses of the dark elves typically only wear metal bikinis and loincloths and, in the witch elves' case, thigh-high boots.
** ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' has the Sisters Repentia, who wear little more than scraps of parchment covering key areas; and Dark Eldar Wytches, who are best described as wearing leather bikinis with armoured, high-heel boots. With the Sisters Repentia, it's justified by them being DeathSeeker|s, and with the Wytches it's justified by them being gladiatrices in Commorragh, the Milky Way's ultimate wretched hive of scum and villainy. Any Wytch who isn't sexually appealing enough for the crowds inevitably gets stuck in a HopelessBossFight at the arena.
* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' is occasionally guilty of this, especially when it regards ''[[OurAngelsAreDifferent angels]]''. The [[ProudWarriorRace Vulshok]] and [[NobleSavage Auriok]] seem to be explicitly forbidden from wearing more clothing than absolutely necessary.
**
Mirrodin is generally the closest that Magic gets to a Stripperiffic setting, setting -- few of its inhabitants wear much more than loincloths -- and even then it's somewhat [[PlayingWithATrope played with]]: most organic beings on the plane - -- including people - -- are born with substantial metallic inclusions as part of their bodies, so the dichotomy separating clothing from bare 'skin' "skin" isn't all that well-defined. (Does it count as nudity if you have a built-in ChainmailBikini?)
* ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' features quite a few characters who have no taste for pants, such as Harmonious Jade (long loincloth), the Green Lady (a single long ribbon wound around her body), Sulamore the Wan Stravophore (stripper bondage nun gear), and Thousand-Faceted Nelumbo (often depicted wearing nothing ''but'' shoulder pads, knee pads, and a cape). Of course, they're all Exalted of various stripes, which means they get access to Perfect Defenses, things that allow you to dodge, parry or withstand any attack even if you're naked and just holding a dessert fork.



* A whole lot of the female characters in ''TabletopGame/AnimaBeyondFantasy'' are dressed like high-class call-girls, with plenty (well, relatively speaking) of leather, lace, and frills.
* In ''Tabletopgame/BattleTech'', pilots of [[HumongousMecha Battlemechs]] go into combat wearing little more than a thin vest and shorty shorts. {{Justified|Trope}}, as the cockpit of a battlemech, can become lethally hot in combat due to OverHeating; the vests are laced with a network of cooling cables. Downplayed as the series moves on and LostTechnology is recovered, allowing full-body jumpsuits laced with new non-toxic coolant fluid.
* There are a number of incidents of this in ''TabletopGame/RocketAge'', but the best and most {{justified|Trope}} example is the Silthuri dueling vest, a set of armour designed to protect the groin, face, neck, inner things, wrists, and upper chest in a duel to determine first blood, but not meant to kill. Traditionally no other clothing is worn while dueling, leaving a lot on display.
* All five Staple Resources in ''TabletopGame/TheSpoils'' feature women in tight and/or skimpy clothing.

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* ''TabletopGame/AnimaBeyondFantasy'': A whole lot of the female characters in ''TabletopGame/AnimaBeyondFantasy'' are dressed like high-class call-girls, with plenty (well, relatively speaking) of leather, lace, and frills.
* In ''Tabletopgame/BattleTech'', pilots ''Tabletopgame/BattleTech'': Pilots of [[HumongousMecha Battlemechs]] go into combat wearing little more than a thin vest and shorty shorts. {{Justified|Trope}}, as the cockpit of a battlemech, can become lethally hot in combat due to OverHeating; the vests are laced with a network of cooling cables. Downplayed as the series moves on and LostTechnology is recovered, allowing full-body jumpsuits laced with new non-toxic coolant fluid.
* ''TabletopGame/RocketAge'': There are a number of incidents of this in ''TabletopGame/RocketAge'', this, but the best and most {{justified|Trope}} example is the Silthuri dueling vest, a set of armour designed to protect the groin, face, neck, inner things, wrists, and upper chest in a duel to determine first blood, but not meant to kill. Traditionally no other clothing is worn while dueling, leaving a lot on display.
* ''TabletopGame/TheSpoils'': All five Staple Resources in ''TabletopGame/TheSpoils'' feature women in tight and/or skimpy clothing.


** ArmorIsUseless in this setting anyway. Most of the best fighters don't bother with it at all; Hercules and Iolaus over on ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' were generally showing more skin than Xena's outfit does. Iolaus, in particular, doesn't seem to own a shirt.

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** ArmorIsUseless in this setting anyway. Most of the best fighters don't bother with it at all; Hercules and Iolaus over on ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'' were generally showing more skin than Xena's outfit does. Iolaus, in particular, [[WalkingShirtlessScene doesn't seem to own a shirt.shirt]].


* In ''WebAnimation/IfTheEmperorHadATextToSpeechDevice'', ''all'' the Custodes are this, even [[TwentyFourHourArmor Little Kitten]] at one time. The least clothed being the trio called the Fabulous Custodes [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure (Karstodes, Custodisi, and Whammudes)]] wear only loincloths and hearty amount of body oil, though a [[LargeHam nameless one]] based on Diavolo (Custodevolo?) at least wears a pair of pants.

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* In ''WebAnimation/IfTheEmperorHadATextToSpeechDevice'', ''all'' the Custodes are this, even [[TwentyFourHourArmor Little Kitten]] at one time. The least clothed being the trio called the Fabulous Custodes [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure (Karstodes, Custodisi, and Whammudes)]] wear only loincloths loincloths, helmets, and a hearty amount of body oil, though a [[LargeHam nameless one]] based on Diavolo (Custodevolo?) (named in the credits as Diavodes) at least wears a pair of pants.


* ''Webcomic/TheInexplicableAdventuresOfBob'' has [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/VolTurn.html Princess Voluptua.]] 'Nuff said.

to:

* ''Webcomic/TheInexplicableAdventuresOfBob'' has [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/VolTurn.html [[https://bobadventures.thecomicseries.com/files/images/VolTurnWeb.jpg Princess Voluptua.]] 'Nuff said.

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** It's indoor cousin for women, while much more conservative in terms of skin coverage, still is no slouch when it comes to showing off the [[StatuesqueStunner tall]] and [[MsFanservice shapely]] figures of its' players. For one, the bottom part is a set of [[WhoWearsShortShorts shorts that border on being bloomers]], the top is a shirt with extremely short sleeves that are a step from being a tanktop, and both are [[SensualSpandex made of spandex]]. There is a reason ''why'' volleyball is advised for girls who'd like to take up a sport and want the DudeMagnet status.


* In ''ComicStrip/ModestyBlaise'', the titular character was very fond of remaining only in her BlackBraAndPanties for fights.

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* Creator/EnriqueRomero routinely undresses the heroines he draws for British newspaper strips.
**
In ''ComicStrip/ModestyBlaise'', the titular character was very fond of remaining only in her BlackBraAndPanties for fights.fights.
** In ''ComicStrip/{{Axa}}'', most of the time, Axa ambles about her ravaged world wearing only a bandeau top and a loincloth made from the tatters of her old Domed City uniform. That bandeau top routinely deserts her whenever Axa has to fight for her life or her freedom.


** In ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen'', Emma Frost surprisingly survives Adaption Decay in almost every possible way... including her extremely revealing outfit. Plus, she has a sexy UsefulNotes/{{British Accent|s}} to boot. God bless them.

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** In ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen'', ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen2009'', Emma Frost surprisingly survives Adaption Decay in almost every possible way... including her extremely revealing outfit. Plus, she has a sexy UsefulNotes/{{British Accent|s}} to boot. God bless them.

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* Women's rave outfits once involved bright T-shirts and baggy pants, but now are likely to include things like string bikinis and pasties.

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** Mirrodin is generally the closest that Magic gets to a Stripperiffic setting, and even then it's somewhat [[PlayingWithATrope played with]]: most organic beings on the plane - including people - are born with substantial metallic inclusions as part of their bodies, so the dichotomy separating clothing from bare 'skin' isn't all that well-defined. (Does it count as nudity if you have a built-in ChainmailBikini?)


* Being a robot, Jenny from ''WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot'' doesn't actually wear clothes, but her design is meant to look like she's got a very short tube top, and miniskirt, and boots. Very skimpy for a teenage girl...

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* Being a robot, Jenny from ''WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot'' doesn't actually wear clothes, but her design is meant to look like she's got wearing a very short tube crop top, and miniskirt, and boots. Very skimpy for a teenage girl...

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* ''Series/NinjaWarrior'': In a Switzerland charity celebrity edition, Milo Moiré went through a course wearing nothing but a piece of tape between her legs, several other pieces of tape to support (but not cover) her chest, and shoes. She wanted to make a statement protesting censorship so she ran the game in as little of an outfit allowed that could still help her with the acrobatics.


* In the first season of the 1980s sitcom ''Series/ItsALiving'', the lead characters (all waitresses) rotated through a series of tight, skimpy, and revealing outfits, with the most stipperific ones showing up in the opening theme. Apparently, thanks to the outfits, some viewers thought the characters actually ''were'' strippers, not waitresses, and a panicked network insisted that the waitresses' uniforms be made slightly more modest in later seasons. (Though there is still something of the FrenchMaidOutfit to those later season uniforms....)

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* In the first season of the 1980s sitcom ''Series/ItsALiving'', the lead characters (all waitresses) rotated through a series of tight, skimpy, and revealing outfits, with the most stipperific ones showing up in the opening theme. Apparently, thanks to the outfits, series title, and theme song (which never mentioned their occupation, but emphasized that the cast was "young and healthy" and would go "the way the traffic flows") some viewers thought the characters actually ''were'' strippers, not waitresses, and a strippers -- or sex workers. A panicked network insisted that the waitresses' uniforms be made slightly more modest in later seasons.seasons, which they were. (Though there is still something of the FrenchMaidOutfit to those later season uniforms....)

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* In the first season of the 1980s sitcom ''Series/ItsALiving'', the lead characters (all waitresses) rotated through a series of tight, skimpy, and revealing outfits, with the most stipperific ones showing up in the opening theme. Apparently, thanks to the outfits, some viewers thought the characters actually ''were'' strippers, not waitresses, and a panicked network insisted that the waitresses' uniforms be made slightly more modest in later seasons. (Though there is still something of the FrenchMaidOutfit to those later season uniforms....)

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