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* The various ''ComicBook/XMen'' and spinoff series semi-regularly feature intolerant, hate-preaching [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purifiers_(Marvel_Comics) fundamentalist groups]] obviously based off televangelists and Southern Baptists with some Ku Klux Klan thrown in for good measure as villains. Several major arcs featured a Reverend Stryker becoming a major threat to the X-Men. Less common, but still present on rare occasions, are religious folk shown opposing the extremist fringe. (Anti-mutant discrimination is often played to echo historic discrimination against Blacks in America. That the actual emancipation movement first took root in religious circles is not similarly reflected.) They also, especially in the last few years, represent gays, so religious persecution makes perfect sense. That's the X-Men - they stand in for every minority group ever. Any political view can be justified with the right interpretation of a religion. The first arc of the Comicbook/MarvelNOW ''Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Comicbook/XForce'' relaunch has the team taking on the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's equivalent of Chick-fil-A. The only difference is they swapped out the restaurant chain's homophobic leanings for a hatred of mutants.

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* The various ''ComicBook/XMen'' and spinoff series semi-regularly feature intolerant, hate-preaching [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purifiers_(Marvel_Comics) fundamentalist groups]] obviously based off televangelists and Southern Westboro Baptists with some Ku Klux Klan thrown in for good measure as villains. Several major arcs featured a Reverend Stryker becoming a major threat to the X-Men. Less common, but still present on rare occasions, are religious folk shown opposing the extremist fringe. (Anti-mutant discrimination is often played to echo historic discrimination against Blacks in America. That the actual emancipation movement first took root in religious circles is not similarly reflected.) They also, especially in the last few years, represent gays, so religious persecution makes perfect sense. That's the X-Men - they stand in for every minority group ever. Any political view can be justified with the right interpretation of a religion. The first arc of the Comicbook/MarvelNOW ''Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Comicbook/XForce'' relaunch has the team taking on the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's equivalent of Chick-fil-A. The only difference is they swapped out the restaurant chain's alleged homophobic leanings for a hatred of mutants.


* ''ComicBook/{{Viz}}'' has a number of one-joke characters based around parodying certain political viewpoints. Ones which still appear regularly are Millie Tant (StrawFeminist), Major Misunderstanding (conservative GrumpyOldMan who hates the modern world in general and anybody who isn't a white male heterosexual Tory in particular), Meddlesome Ratbag (right-wing MoralGuardian), and the Male Online (AnthropomorphicPersonification of the very right-wing ''Daily Mail'' newspaper). The comic also used to feature The Modern Parents (trendy middle-class BourgeoisBohemian leftist/environmentalist) but they haven't appeared for some time. Actual politician Baxter Basics is ''not'' an example, as his strips tend to revolve around his sexual depravity, financial corruption, and general self-centredness rather than partisan ideological humour.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Viz}}'' has a number of one-joke characters based around parodying certain political viewpoints. Ones which still appear regularly are Millie Tant (StrawFeminist), Major Misunderstanding (conservative GrumpyOldMan who hates the modern world in general and anybody who isn't a white male heterosexual Tory in particular), Meddlesome Ratbag (right-wing MoralGuardian), and the Male Online (AnthropomorphicPersonification of the very right-wing ''Daily Mail'' newspaper). The comic also used to feature The Modern Parents (trendy (a parody of media depictions of trendy middle-class BourgeoisBohemian leftist/environmentalist) but they haven't appeared for some time. Actual politician Baxter Basics is ''not'' ''[[AvertedTrope not]]'' [[AvertedTrope an example, example]], as his strips tend to revolve around his sexual depravity, financial corruption, and general self-centredness rather than partisan ideological humour.



* ''Film/LaCageAuxFolles'', feature an obvious strawman in the father of a gay man's son's fiancée. The French version has deputy Simon Charrier being played by Michel Galabru, who turns the straw into pure comedic awesomeness. This being a ''French'' movie, Sarrier was not meant to be a strawman conservative, but a religious extremist: unlike the US and its Two-Party System, French religious extremists do not get along well with French conservatives and usually French conservatives do not feel they are targeted when watching the movie.

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* ''Film/LaCageAuxFolles'', feature an obvious strawman in the father of a gay man's son's fiancée. The French version has deputy Simon Charrier being played by Michel Galabru, who turns the straw into pure comedic awesomeness. This being a ''French'' movie, Sarrier was not meant to be a strawman conservative, but a religious extremist: unlike Given the US and its Two-Party System, multi-party French religious extremists do not get along well with French political system, conservatives and usually French conservatives fundamentalists do not share a party, and thus the former would not feel they are targeted when watching the movie.targeted.



** In ''Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand'', Heinlein once again goes back to libertarian views involving a rich and famous MarySue writer/doctor/lawyer, protecting an even ''more'' rich and famous MarySue Martian/Changeling/cult-leader from a human society of fascist-politicians and religious-fanatics who want to stop/control/kill him -- sort of an interplanetary version of ''Atlas Shrugged,'' along with arguments comparing humans to monkeys and God.

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** In ''Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand'', Heinlein once again goes back to libertarian views involving a rich and famous MarySue writer/doctor/lawyer, protecting an even ''more'' rich and famous MarySue Martian/Changeling/cult-leader from a human society of fascist-politicians fascist politicians and religious-fanatics religious fanatics who want to stop/control/kill him -- sort of an interplanetary version of ''Atlas Shrugged,'' along with arguments comparing humans to monkeys and God.



* The ''Literature/InDeath'' series: Some characters are certainly this, with Commander Douglas Skinner from ''Interlude In Death'' standing out in particular. "Instead, he'd put in his fifty and then used that as a springboard in a run for Congress. And had fallen hard on his face. A half century of public service hadn't been enough to offset views so narrow even the most dug-in of the Conservative Party had balked. Added to that, his platform had swung unevenly from side to side. He was an unwavering supporter of the Gun Ban, something the Conservatives tried to overturn at every opportunity. Yet he beat the drum to reinstate the death penalty, which alienated the Liberals from mid-road to far left. He wanted to dissolve legal and regulated prostitution and strike out all legal and tax benefits for cohabitating couples. He preached about the sanctity of marriage, as long as it was heterosexual, but disavowed the government stipend for professional mothers. Motherhood, the gospel according to Skinner stated, was a God-given duty, and payment in its own right. His mixed-voice and muddled campaign had gone down in flames. However much he'd rebounded financially via lectures, books, and consults, Eve imagined he still bore the burns of that failure." Apparently, Skinner is supposed to be a Straw Conservative with TheFundamentalist mixed in, but even the Conservative Party didn't like him very much because he didn't agree with ''all'' their policies. This is hardly the biggest strawman character in the series either. That honor goes to a conservative senator in the first book, who's a literal slobbering pedophile rapist (incestuous, at that). In general, the series treats conservatives as being, nearly to a man (and they're all men), misogynist assholes, while liberals (especially liberal politicians) are portrayed as being respectable if not likable. The series moves away from this a bit later on, able to treat at least some subjects considered conservative (such as religion) with respect, but at the same time goes back to referring to the conservative political party as the Republicans.

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* The ''Literature/InDeath'' series: series:
**
Some characters are certainly this, with Commander Douglas Skinner from ''Interlude In Death'' standing out in particular. "Instead, he'd put in his fifty and then used that as a springboard in a run for Congress. And had fallen hard on his face. A half century of public service hadn't been enough to offset views so narrow even the most dug-in of the Conservative Party had balked. Added to that, his platform had swung unevenly from side to side. He was an unwavering supporter of the Gun Ban, something the Conservatives tried to overturn at every opportunity. Yet he beat the drum to reinstate the death penalty, which alienated the Liberals from mid-road to far left. He wanted to dissolve legal and regulated prostitution and strike out all legal and tax benefits for cohabitating couples. He preached about the sanctity of marriage, as long as it was heterosexual, but disavowed the government stipend for professional mothers. Motherhood, the gospel according to Skinner stated, was a God-given duty, and payment in its own right. His mixed-voice and muddled campaign had gone down in flames. However much he'd rebounded financially via lectures, books, and consults, Eve imagined he still bore the burns of that failure." Apparently, Skinner is supposed to be a Straw Conservative with TheFundamentalist mixed in, but even the Conservative Party didn't like him very much because he didn't agree with ''all'' their policies. This is hardly the biggest strawman character in the series either. That honor goes to a conservative senator in the first book, who's a literal slobbering pedophile rapist (incestuous, at that). In general, the series treats conservatives as being, nearly to a man (and they're all men), misogynist assholes, while liberals (especially liberal politicians) are portrayed as being respectable if not likable. The series moves away from this a bit later on, able to treat at least some subjects considered conservative (such as religion) with respect, but at the same time goes back to referring to the conservative political party as the Republicans.



* ''Series/AllInTheFamily'' had the character Archie Bunker, who was created by producer Norman Lear to be a Neanderthalesque caricature of working-class conservatives. [[MisaimedFandom It backfired.]] Bunker was based on Alf Garnett of ''Series/TillDeathUsDoPart'' and its sequels. Creator Johnny Speight claimed the character was based directly on his own father's POV.
** In adapting Alf Garnett in Archie Bunker, Lear injected his own father's attitudes and catchphrases.
** Alf Garnett also backfired, being a racist idiot who became an idol to people who seemed to miss that fact that he was created, scripted and acted by Jews.

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* ''Series/AllInTheFamily'' had the character Archie Bunker, who was created by producer Norman Lear to be a Neanderthalesque caricature of working-class conservatives. [[MisaimedFandom It backfired.]] ]]
**
Bunker was based on Alf Garnett of ''Series/TillDeathUsDoPart'' and its sequels. Creator Johnny Speight claimed the character was based directly on his own father's POV.
** In
POV (in adapting Alf Garnett in Archie Bunker, Lear injected his own father's attitudes and catchphrases.
**
catchphrases). Alf Garnett also backfired, being a racist racist, borderline anti-Semitic idiot who became an idol to people who seemed to miss that fact that he was created, scripted and acted by Jews.''Jews''.



* ''Series/TheHalfHourNewsHour'' was a conservative response to ''Series/TheDailyShow'', an attempt to inject right-leaning political humor into the market. Its jokes were largely based on taking down straw versions of liberal figures and stereotypes.

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* ''Series/TheHalfHourNewsHour'' was a conservative response to ''Series/TheDailyShow'', in an attempt to inject right-leaning political humor into the market. Its jokes were largely based on taking down straw versions of liberal figures and stereotypes.



* ''Series/TheNewsroom'' used this as part of its series-wide attack on the Tea Party. The ShowWithinAShow's anchor Will [=McAvoy=], a [[FoxNewsLiberal self-described conservative]], and the rest of his staff regularly tear into Tea Party-aligned characters on the show, with Will stating that they are not true conservatives. The straw characters typically collapse under the assault. The trope is regularly addressed, however:

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* ''Series/TheNewsroom'' used this as part of its series-wide attack on the Tea Party. The ShowWithinAShow's anchor Will [=McAvoy=], a [[FoxNewsLiberal self-described conservative]], and the rest of his staff regularly tear into Tea Party-aligned characters on the show, with Will stating that they are not true conservatives.conservatives, but actually near-fascists. The straw characters typically collapse under the assault. The trope is regularly addressed, however:



** After another episode, Sorkin defended Will's ability to win a debate with a gay adviser of Rick Santorum because it was necessary for Will to feel guilty about his bullying behavior afterwards for the sake of character development.
* The British No 2 AV campaign used Alan B'Stard as an example of the kind of arsehole who would ''inevitably'' saturate the UK's political life if AV was introduced. Unfortunately, most of his dickery could easily be attributed to the politicians of the status quo.

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** After another episode, creator Aaron Sorkin defended Will's ability to win a debate with a gay adviser of Rick Santorum because it was necessary for Will to feel guilty about his bullying behavior afterwards for the sake of character development.
* ''The New Statesman'' featured a scathing parody of the Thatcher ministry, particularly in its depiction of Alan B'Stard.
**
The British No 2 AV campaign used Alan B'Stard as an example of the kind of arsehole who would ''inevitably'' saturate the UK's political life if AV "alternative voting" was introduced. Unfortunately, most of his dickery could easily be attributed to the politicians of the status quo.



* ''Series/TheWestWing'' tends to have liberal-leaning sensibilities, but tries to avert or subvert this trope. However, it's played straight with its portrayal of members of the religious right. The pilot alone portrays religious leaders who are shown to be hypocritical, anti-Semitic, and tacitly condoning ''very'' extreme methods.

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* ''Series/TheWestWing'' tends to have liberal-leaning sensibilities, but tries to avert or subvert this trope. However, it's played straight with its portrayal of members of the religious right.[[TheFundamentalist Religious Right]]. The pilot alone portrays religious leaders who are shown to be hypocritical, anti-Semitic, and tacitly condoning ''very'' extreme methods.



* Conservapedia: "The Trustworthy Encyclopedia". All articles on Democratic/Liberal/Evolutionary topics are built of straw. Their article on President Obama is a stewed mixture of straw, insults and long discredited smears.

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* Conservapedia: "The Trustworthy Encyclopedia". All articles on Democratic/Liberal/Evolutionary topics are built of straw. Their article on President Obama is a stewed mixture of straw, insults and long discredited long-discredited smears.



* Ms. Betty Bowers, a fictional member of the fictional Landover Baptist, has her own [[http://www.bettybowers.com/ website]] and Website/YouTube [[https://www.youtube.com/user/MrsBettyBowers channel]]. She spends a good deal of her videos [[RichBitch extolling her own opulent lifestyle]] and tends to feature [[ItsAllAboutMe her own image]] [[StrawHypocrite more than Jesus's]].

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* ** Ms. Betty Bowers, a fictional member of the fictional Landover Baptist, has her own [[http://www.bettybowers.com/ website]] and Website/YouTube [[https://www.youtube.com/user/MrsBettyBowers channel]]. She spends a good deal of her videos [[RichBitch extolling her own opulent lifestyle]] and tends to feature [[ItsAllAboutMe her own image]] [[StrawHypocrite more than Jesus's]].



* Political memes on social media often distort the other side's views, sometimes beyond recognition, e.g., accusing right-libertarians of believing that Creator/AynRand was an economist.

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* Political memes on social media often distort the other side's views, sometimes beyond recognition, e.g., accusing right-libertarians right-leaning libertarians of believing that Creator/AynRand was an economist.



* Just say that ''any'' political cartoonist has done this; in fact, their profession demands it.

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* Just say that ''any'' political cartoonist has done this; in fact, their profession demands ''demands'' it.



* Going further back, ''ComicStrip/LittleOrphanAnnie'' and ''ComicStrip/LilAbner'' frequently served up liberal versions, while ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' featured them on both sides (though more often as conservatives, given Walt Kelly's politics).

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* Going further back, ''ComicStrip/LittleOrphanAnnie'' hammered liberals and the New Deal quite frequently.
*
''ComicStrip/LilAbner'' frequently served up liberal versions, while often poked fun at conservatives for most of its run, but it's better remembered these days for Al Capp's tirades against hippies and the "New Left".
*
''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' featured them strawmen on both sides (though more often as conservatives, given Walt Kelly's politics).politics). A particularly famous example is that of Senator Malarkey, a thinly-veiled TakeThat of Joseph [=McCarthy=].



* The ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' franchise often features conservative politicians as [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic murderous fascists]] [[ANaziByAnyOtherName in all but name]], while liberals are portrayed as [[DramaQueen touchy-feely]] [[BombThrowingAnarchists pseudo-anarchists]] who are in it just for the money and to gain some moral superiority. [[WordOfGod Dan Hauser actually complained]] that since ''GTA V'', particularly after the highly-contentious U.S. Presidential Election of 2016, real-life politicians have become too similar to the games' parodies, making it hard to parody them without harboring UnfortunateImplications (and entering "DudeNotFunny territory") instead of just poking fun at the most ideologically-charged aspects of the UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem. Because of this, Houser says that Rockstar does not plan on making or releasing ''GTA 6'' at least until after UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump leaves the White House.
** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity'' has a talk show where right and left-wing strawmen try to out-straw each other.

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* The ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' franchise often features conservative politicians as [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic murderous fascists]] [[ANaziByAnyOtherName in all but name]], while liberals are portrayed as [[DramaQueen touchy-feely]] [[BombThrowingAnarchists pseudo-anarchists]] who are in it just for the money and to gain some moral superiority. [[WordOfGod Dan Hauser actually complained]] that since ''GTA V'', and particularly after the highly-contentious U.S. Presidential Election of 2016, real-life politicians have become too similar to the games' parodies, making it hard to parody them without harboring UnfortunateImplications (and entering "DudeNotFunny territory") instead of just poking fun at the most ideologically-charged aspects of the UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem. Because of this, Houser says that Rockstar does not plan on making or releasing ''GTA 6'' at least until after UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump leaves the White House.
** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity'' has a talk show where right right- and left-wing strawmen try to out-straw each other.



* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'' and [[VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2 the prequel]] both contain many characters representative of the hideously dated and idiotic views commonly held in the turn of the 19th Century into the 20th, such as a couple of critics of the burgeoning feminist movement, and a eugenics advocate (who is apparently so hated even in 1899 that you can beat the everloving crud out of him in broad daylight and the local police don't even charge you for it). The games take a lot of relish in making fun of these characters.

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* ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'' and [[VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption2 the prequel]] both contain many characters representative of the hideously dated and idiotic views commonly held in the turn of the 19th Century into the 20th, such as a couple of critics of the burgeoning feminist movement, and a eugenics advocate (who is apparently so hated even in 1899 that you can beat the everloving ever-loving crud out of him in broad daylight and the local police don't even charge you for it). The games take a lot of relish in making fun of these characters.



* Being the politically minded work that it is, ''[[Blog/ElChiguireBipolar El Chigüire Bipolar]]'' will often feature these.

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* Being the politically politically.minded work that it is, ''[[Blog/ElChiguireBipolar El Chigüire Bipolar]]'' will often feature these.



* While rife with political satire, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' is notorious for hammering the Republican Party in particular, whose Springfield headquarters is a Transylvanian-style castle which furnishes the page image. Consider that the Springfield GOP's mayoral candidate in one instance had just left jail, having been convicted for attempted murder.

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* While rife with political satire, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' is notorious for hammering the Republican Party in particular, whose Springfield headquarters is a Transylvanian-style castle which furnishes the page image. Consider that the Springfield GOP's mayoral candidate in one instance had just left jail, having been convicted for attempted murder.attempting murder ''twice'', while a Rush Limbaugh-esque talk radio host paints him as the victim of America's "liberal" justice system.


* The various ''ComicBook/XMen'' and spinoff series semi-regularly feature intolerant, hate-preaching [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purifiers_(Marvel_Comics) fundamentalist groups]] obviously based off televangelists and Westboro Baptists with some Ku Klux Klan thrown in for good measure as villains. Several major arcs featured a Reverend Stryker becoming a major threat to the X-Men. Less common, but still present on rare occasions, are religious folk shown opposing the extremist fringe. (Anti-mutant discrimination is often played to echo historic discrimination against Blacks in America. That the actual emancipation movement first took root in religious circles is not similarly reflected.) They also, especially in the last few years, represent gays, so religious persecution makes perfect sense. That's the X-Men - they stand in for every minority group ever. Any political view can be justified with the right interpretation of a religion. The first arc of the Comicbook/MarvelNOW ''Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Comicbook/XForce'' relaunch has the team taking on the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's equivalent of Chick-fil-A. The only difference is they swapped out the restaurant chain's alleged homophobic leanings for a hatred of mutants.

to:

* The various ''ComicBook/XMen'' and spinoff series semi-regularly feature intolerant, hate-preaching [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purifiers_(Marvel_Comics) fundamentalist groups]] obviously based off televangelists and Westboro Southern Baptists with some Ku Klux Klan thrown in for good measure as villains. Several major arcs featured a Reverend Stryker becoming a major threat to the X-Men. Less common, but still present on rare occasions, are religious folk shown opposing the extremist fringe. (Anti-mutant discrimination is often played to echo historic discrimination against Blacks in America. That the actual emancipation movement first took root in religious circles is not similarly reflected.) They also, especially in the last few years, represent gays, so religious persecution makes perfect sense. That's the X-Men - they stand in for every minority group ever. Any political view can be justified with the right interpretation of a religion. The first arc of the Comicbook/MarvelNOW ''Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Comicbook/XForce'' relaunch has the team taking on the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's equivalent of Chick-fil-A. The only difference is they swapped out the restaurant chain's alleged homophobic leanings for a hatred of mutants.


* The various ''ComicBook/XMen'' and spinoff series semi-regularly feature intolerant, hate-preaching [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purifiers_(Marvel_Comics) fundamentalist groups]] obviously based off televangelists and Southern Baptists with some Ku Klux Klan thrown in for good measure as villains. Several major arcs featured a Reverend Stryker becoming a major threat to the X-Men. Less common, but still present on rare occasions, are religious folk shown opposing the extremist fringe. (Anti-mutant discrimination is often played to echo historic discrimination against Blacks in America. That the actual emancipation movement first took root in religious circles is not similarly reflected.) They also, especially in the last few years, represent gays, so religious persecution makes perfect sense. That's the X-Men - they stand in for every minority group ever. Any political view can be justified with the right interpretation of a religion. The first arc of the Comicbook/MarvelNOW ''Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Comicbook/XForce'' relaunch has the team taking on the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's equivalent of Chick-fil-A. The only difference is they swapped out the restaurant chain's homophobic leanings for a hatred of mutants.

to:

* The various ''ComicBook/XMen'' and spinoff series semi-regularly feature intolerant, hate-preaching [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purifiers_(Marvel_Comics) fundamentalist groups]] obviously based off televangelists and Southern Westboro Baptists with some Ku Klux Klan thrown in for good measure as villains. Several major arcs featured a Reverend Stryker becoming a major threat to the X-Men. Less common, but still present on rare occasions, are religious folk shown opposing the extremist fringe. (Anti-mutant discrimination is often played to echo historic discrimination against Blacks in America. That the actual emancipation movement first took root in religious circles is not similarly reflected.) They also, especially in the last few years, represent gays, so religious persecution makes perfect sense. That's the X-Men - they stand in for every minority group ever. Any political view can be justified with the right interpretation of a religion. The first arc of the Comicbook/MarvelNOW ''Comicbook/{{Cable}} and Comicbook/XForce'' relaunch has the team taking on the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's equivalent of Chick-fil-A. The only difference is they swapped out the restaurant chain's alleged homophobic leanings for a hatred of mutants.

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* HeteronormativeCrusader


* While it rarely alluded to politics, ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' did a number of rather subtle jokes at the expense of conservatives, criticizing the Reagan administration's rhetoric regarding the ColdWar, comparing it to the RedScare of the 1950s. Interestingly, one strip had Calvin dismissing "conservative talk radio" as a bunch of kids spouting nonsense. This was published in 1986 when Rush Limbaugh became an overnight success and the FCC was about to drop its "Fairness Doctrine" policy.

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* While it rarely alluded to politics, ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' did a number of rather subtle jokes at the expense of conservatives, criticizing the Reagan administration's rhetoric regarding the ColdWar, comparing it to the RedScare of the 1950s. Interestingly, one strip had Calvin dismissing "conservative talk radio" as a bunch of kids spouting nonsense. This was published in 1986 when Rush Limbaugh became an overnight success and the FCC was about to drop its "Fairness Doctrine" policy. Watterson's editors eventually compelled him to dial down these jokes.



* ''Non Sequitur'' makes constant jabs at conservatives. Actually, the strip ran into trouble in 2019 after a strip had a scribble featuring an alleged insult aimed at Donald Trump.
* ''ComicStrip/{{Dustin}}'':
** The strip's creators (Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker) are both staunchly conservative editorial cartoonists. Unsurprisingly, they have mocked liberals in a few occasions, most notably with recurring unseen character Chris, a marijuana advocate who always makes a fool of himself.
** The title character could be interpreted as having a Straw Lifestyle, preferring to slack around rather than doing something for himself. At least, this attribute had some depth added into it (having just graduated at the height of the Great Recession).



* Sam Polinsky (Corey Graves' brother and former FCW developmental talent Buddy Stetcher) portrays a character called "Sam Adonis" in Mexico, as a [[ForeignWrestlingHeel Mexico-hating]] Donald Trump supporter. He's not a Trump supporter in real life.

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* Sam Polinsky (Corey Graves' brother and former FCW developmental talent Buddy Stetcher) portrays a character called "Sam Adonis" in Mexico, as a [[ForeignWrestlingHeel Mexico-hating]] Donald Trump supporter. He's not a supporter, although like Richards, Polinsky is quite the liberal, and no Trump supporter in real life. fan at all.


* Valentine, the villain of ''Film/KingsmanTheSecretService'' is a Straw Enviromentalist willing to kill off most of humanity to solve overpopulation. Oddly, one organization he aids is a straw [[TheFundamentalist extremist church]] that might as well be TheKlan under a religious facade. Meanwhile, the US President in ''Film/KingsmanTheGoldenCircle'' is a straw [[TheSocialDarwinist Social Darwinist]] who doesn't really care if millions die just because they used drugs.

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* Valentine, the villain of ''Film/KingsmanTheSecretService'' is a Straw Enviromentalist willing to kill off most of humanity to solve overpopulation. Oddly, one organization he aids is a straw [[TheFundamentalist extremist church]] that might as well be TheKlan under a religious facade.facade ([[PoesLaw it's actually a parody of the real-life Westboro Baptist Church]]). Meanwhile, the US President in ''Film/KingsmanTheGoldenCircle'' is a straw [[TheSocialDarwinist Social Darwinist]] who doesn't really care if millions die just because they used drugs.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Zootopia}}'' is unique among family-oriented animated films for its use of the trope, which got it in the news (no less considering that it was released during the 2016 US presidential campaign): [[BitchInSheepsClothing Assistant Mayor Bellwether]] sees herself as the tribune of preys and deliberately riles up tensions between them and predators. Meanwhile, the Mayor, while portrayed sympathetically, firmly clings to the belief that predators are better than preys anyway.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Zootopia}}'' ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' is unique among family-oriented animated films for its use of the trope, which got it in the news (no less considering that it was released during the 2016 US presidential campaign): [[BitchInSheepsClothing Assistant Mayor Bellwether]] sees herself as the tribune of preys and deliberately riles up tensions between them and predators. Meanwhile, the Mayor, while portrayed sympathetically, firmly clings to the belief that predators are better than preys anyway.anyway and is extremely reluctant about upending the ''status quo''.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Zootopia}}'' is unique among family-oriented animated films for its use of the trope, which got it in the news (no less considering that it was released during the 2016 US presidential campaign): [[BitchInSheepsClothing Assistant Mayor Bellwether]] sees herself as the tribune of preys and deliberately riles up tensions between them and predators. Meanwhile, the Mayor, while portrayed sympathetically, firmly clings to the belief that predators are better than preys anyway.

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