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* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': [[GeneralRipper General Eiling]] is shown to have sinister straw-conservative leanings, he's eager to drop [[NukeEm nuclear bombs]] on the Justice League, blames the "bleeding hearts in Congress" for not getting his way and eventually turns himself into a supervillain in order to "defend" America from heroes. The series also features a cowardly straw-Bill O'Reilly type character. However, like the comic books, they avoid hinting which political side Lex Luthor leans toward in his policies when he runs for president. A quick line of dialogue revealed he was running as an independent.

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* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'': ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'':
**
[[GeneralRipper General Eiling]] is shown to have sinister straw-conservative leanings, he's eager to drop [[NukeEm nuclear bombs]] on the Justice League, blames the "bleeding hearts in Congress" for not getting his way and eventually turns himself into a supervillain in order to "defend" America from heroes. The series also features a cowardly straw-Bill O'Reilly type character. However, like character.
** Like
the comic books, they avoid hinting which political side Lex Luthor leans toward in his policies when he runs for president. A quick line of dialogue revealed he was running as an independent.


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** Green Arrow is a much more downplayed version. Like the comics, Green Arrow is liberal in his views and comments on it from time to time (he is a self described "old lefty" and marched against nuclear energy in college, according to a comment made to Captain Atom). Unlike the two straw conservative examples above, however, he is very respectful of the other heroes, even when he disagrees with them, and was brought into the League specifically to counter-balance them and offer a street-level perspective.


** In a final argument, StrawmanHasAPoint. He demands PanderingToTheBase by, for example [[TakeThatScrappy killing off obnoxious characters]] nobody likes. For once, the Overthinker agrees -- and promptly shoots Strawman.

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** In a final argument, StrawmanHasAPoint. He demands PanderingToTheBase -- by, for example example, [[TakeThatScrappy killing off obnoxious characters]] nobody likes. For once, the Overthinker agrees -- and promptly shoots Strawman.


** One time, StrawmanHasAPoint. He demands the Overthinker PanderToTheBase by [[TakeThatScrappy killing off obnoxious characters]] nobody likes. For once, the Overthinker agrees -- and promptly shoots Strawman.

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** One time, In a final argument, StrawmanHasAPoint. He demands the Overthinker PanderToTheBase by PanderingToTheBase by, for example [[TakeThatScrappy killing off obnoxious characters]] nobody likes. For once, the Overthinker agrees -- and promptly shoots Strawman.

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** One time, StrawmanHasAPoint. He demands the Overthinker PanderToTheBase by [[TakeThatScrappy killing off obnoxious characters]] nobody likes. For once, the Overthinker agrees -- and promptly shoots Strawman.


* In the oddest example of this trope, [[https://tellygunge.wordpress.com/archives/story-archive/by-tellygunge/ the Tellygunge series]] ''Comeuppance'' combines this with OfficialFanSubmittedContent. The readers vote on which woman with whatever [[TheScrappy disliked occupation]] will be CoveredInGunge. The thing is that all the women are just straw- well, women for the represented occupation (the Tax lady loves lining her pockets with your cash, the dentist loves to scare you, the airline service check lady demands you pay up if you want to fly if you didn't bring your boarding pass, etc.) Hence, this leads to a case where a woman coming third (or escapes for 2 nights in a row) is seen as a KarmaHoudini, while the gunging is LaserGuidedKarma for their [[DisproportionateRetribution 'misdeeds']].

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* ''WebVideo/TheGameOverthinker'': In early episodes, a character regularly appears to facilitate a dialectic. This character exclusively makes ignorant and fallacious arguments for the oddest example Overthinker to rebut, and also manages to be a StrawFan and StrawCritic of this trope, the show he is in. This character's [[LampshadeHanging name is Strawman]] and he is [[AnimateInanimateObject a talking bale]] of [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin straw]].
*
[[https://tellygunge.wordpress.com/archives/story-archive/by-tellygunge/ the The Tellygunge series]] ''Comeuppance'' combines this with OfficialFanSubmittedContent. The readers vote on which woman with whatever [[TheScrappy disliked occupation]] will be CoveredInGunge. The thing is that all the women are just straw- well, women for the represented occupation (the Tax lady loves lining her pockets with your cash, the dentist loves to scare you, the airline service check lady demands you pay up if you want to fly if you didn't bring your boarding pass, etc.) Hence, this leads to a case where a woman coming third (or escapes for 2 nights in a row) is seen as a KarmaHoudini, while the gunging is LaserGuidedKarma for their [[DisproportionateRetribution 'misdeeds']].


* While rife with political satire, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' is notorious for hammering the Republican Party in particular, whose Springfield headquarters is a Transylvanian-style castle which furnishes the page image. Consider that the Springfield GOP's mayoral candidate in one instance had just left jail, having been convicted for attempting murder ''twice'', while a Rush Limbaugh-esque talk radio host paints him as the victim of America's "liberal" justice system.

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* While rife with political satire, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' is notorious for hammering the Republican Party in particular, whose Springfield headquarters is a Transylvanian-style castle which furnishes the page image. Consider that the Springfield GOP's mayoral candidate in one instance had just left jail, having been convicted for attempting murder ''twice'', while a Rush Limbaugh-esque talk radio host paints him as the victim of America's "liberal" justice system. The Democrats meanwhile are often portrayed as wishy-washy, weak, ineffectual, incompetent, and willing to tolerate the abuses of their own candidates, often exemplified with Mayor Joe Quimby when he's used in episodes detailing the Left/Right divide and not as a general satire on corrupt politicians.


* While it rarely alluded to politics, ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' did a number of rather subtle jokes at the expense of conservatives, criticizing the Reagan administration's rhetoric regarding the ColdWar, comparing it to the RedScare of the 1950s. Interestingly, one strip had Calvin dismissing "conservative talk radio" as a bunch of kids spouting nonsense. This was published in 1986 when Rush Limbaugh became an overnight success and the FCC was about to drop its "Fairness Doctrine" policy, [[ValuesResonance which paved the way for broadcast punditry]]. [[ExecutiveVeto Watterson's editors eventually compelled him to dial down these jokes]], with most of the social commentary put forth afterward being more politically neutral (more focused on economics) but still rather cutting. In hindsight [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools this was probably for the best]], as nowadays the strip is almost quite as fondly remembered and beloved by conservative/right-leaning readers as it is universally adored among liberals. One thing that remained were environmentalist messages and complaints about consumerism. Though generally a left-wing stance in the US, they avoided falling into this trope by not attacking anyone specifically.

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* While it rarely alluded to politics, ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' did a number of rather subtle jokes at the expense of conservatives, criticizing the Reagan administration's rhetoric regarding the ColdWar, UsefulNotes/ColdWar, comparing it to the RedScare of the 1950s. Interestingly, one strip had Calvin dismissing "conservative talk radio" as a bunch of kids spouting nonsense. This was published in 1986 when Rush Limbaugh became an overnight success and the FCC was about to drop its "Fairness Doctrine" policy, [[ValuesResonance which paved the way for broadcast punditry]]. [[ExecutiveVeto Watterson's editors eventually compelled him to dial down these jokes]], with most of the social commentary put forth afterward being more politically neutral (more focused on economics) but still rather cutting. In hindsight [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools this was probably for the best]], as nowadays the strip is almost quite as fondly remembered and beloved by conservative/right-leaning readers as it is universally adored among liberals. One thing that remained were environmentalist messages and complaints about consumerism. Though generally a left-wing stance in the US, they avoided falling into this trope by not attacking anyone specifically.


** Huey Freeman is used to representing far-left radicals; he's been described variously as a socialist or black nationalist. [[DependingOnTheWriter Though it varies]] whether he's a strawman, or is [[StrawmanHasAPoint actually making a good point]].

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** Basically anyone but the main characters in the show have whatever character traits they have taken to the furthest extremes possible. Even Riley, Huey and Grandpa are strawmen at points, although depending on the focus of the episode (with Huey in particular) [[DependingOnTheWriter it varies]] whether they're a strawman, or [[StrawmanHasAPoint actually making a good point]].
** Huey Freeman is used to representing far-left radicals; he's been described variously as a socialist or black nationalist. [[DependingOnTheWriter Though it varies]] whether he's a strawman, or is [[StrawmanHasAPoint actually making a good point]].


** As the seasons progressed, [[Flanderization]] would set in and Hank's discomfort with anything outside his worldview would more often than not be justified, and those holding alternative views were portrayed as dumber than dirt. One late episode has Hank joining a co-op grocery store who's employees, stereotypical hippies one and all, seem to not understand basics of business. After Hank makes some common sense improvements around the store, the employees are shown as dumbfounded by making a profit. Not surprised that the store made a profit, but unaware of the concept that they could have more money than they started with, rendered helpless and dumbstruck until Hank explains basic economics.

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** As the seasons progressed, [[Flanderization]] {{Flanderization}} would set in and Hank's discomfort with anything outside his worldview would more often than not be justified, and those holding alternative views were portrayed as dumber than dirt. One late episode has Hank joining a co-op grocery store who's employees, stereotypical hippies one and all, seem to not understand basics of business. After Hank makes some common sense improvements around the store, the employees are shown as dumbfounded by making a profit. Not surprised that the store made a profit, but unaware of the concept that they could have more money than they started with, rendered helpless and dumbstruck until Hank explains basic economics.

Added DiffLines:

** As the seasons progressed, [[Flanderization]] would set in and Hank's discomfort with anything outside his worldview would more often than not be justified, and those holding alternative views were portrayed as dumber than dirt. One late episode has Hank joining a co-op grocery store who's employees, stereotypical hippies one and all, seem to not understand basics of business. After Hank makes some common sense improvements around the store, the employees are shown as dumbfounded by making a profit. Not surprised that the store made a profit, but unaware of the concept that they could have more money than they started with, rendered helpless and dumbstruck until Hank explains basic economics.

Added DiffLines:

* Played with in an episode of ''Series/NewAmsterdam2018''. Dr. Frome, head off psychiatry, is talking to a patient, who pointed his gun at his ex-wife. The guy accuses Frome of being a "bleeding-heart liberal", who is judging him based on the fact that he believes in the Second Amendment. Later on, Frome explains that yes, he's a "bleeding-heart liberal" (also married to another man), but he is absolute ''for'' responsible gun use, and it is the patient who is the straw character for immediately prejudging him based on a single impression.


[[caption-width-right:320:Members of the Springfield Republican Party include {{Dracula}}, [[CardCarryingVillain Mr. Burns]], [[FelonyMisdemeanor a water-cooler]], and an [[HatesTheJobLovesTheLimelight unfunny]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking clown]].]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:Members of the Springfield Republican Party include {{Dracula}}, [[CardCarryingVillain [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mr. Burns]], [[FelonyMisdemeanor a water-cooler]], and an [[HatesTheJobLovesTheLimelight unfunny]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking clown]].]]

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* In ''Videogame/DiscoElysium'', the player character will inevitably end up as one of these regardless of what political opinion they end up espousing. This ranges from a free-market hating communist with an obsession with violent revolution, a fascist who blames everything on foreigners and women, a money-obsessed "Ultraliberal" who's all about hustling money or a gutless "Moralist" with no true opinion of their own. The other characters of the game tend to be a bit more nuanced however.


* While it rarely alluded to politics, ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' did a number of rather subtle jokes at the expense of conservatives, criticizing the Reagan administration's rhetoric regarding the ColdWar, comparing it to the RedScare of the 1950s. Interestingly, one strip had Calvin dismissing "conservative talk radio" as a bunch of kids spouting nonsense. This was published in 1986 when Rush Limbaugh became an overnight success and the FCC was about to drop its "Fairness Doctrine" policy, [[ValuesResonance which paved the way for broadcast punditry]]. [[ExecutiveVeto Watterson's editors eventually compelled him to dial down these jokes]], with most of the social commentary put forth afterward being more politically neutral (more focused on economics) but still rather cutting. In hindsight [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools this was probably for the best]], as nowadays the strip is almost quite as fondly remembered and beloved by conservative/right-leaning readers as it is universally adored among liberals.

to:

* While it rarely alluded to politics, ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' did a number of rather subtle jokes at the expense of conservatives, criticizing the Reagan administration's rhetoric regarding the ColdWar, comparing it to the RedScare of the 1950s. Interestingly, one strip had Calvin dismissing "conservative talk radio" as a bunch of kids spouting nonsense. This was published in 1986 when Rush Limbaugh became an overnight success and the FCC was about to drop its "Fairness Doctrine" policy, [[ValuesResonance which paved the way for broadcast punditry]]. [[ExecutiveVeto Watterson's editors eventually compelled him to dial down these jokes]], with most of the social commentary put forth afterward being more politically neutral (more focused on economics) but still rather cutting. In hindsight [[Administrivia/TropesAreTools this was probably for the best]], as nowadays the strip is almost quite as fondly remembered and beloved by conservative/right-leaning readers as it is universally adored among liberals. One thing that remained were environmentalist messages and complaints about consumerism. Though generally a left-wing stance in the US, they avoided falling into this trope by not attacking anyone specifically.



* ''ComicStrip/LilAbner'' often poked fun at conservatives for most of its run, but it's better remembered these days for Al Capp's [[AuthorTract tirades against hippies and the "New Left"]] on later years.

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* ''ComicStrip/LilAbner'' often poked fun at conservatives for most of its run, but it's better remembered these days for Al Capp's [[AuthorTract tirades against hippies and the "New Left"]] on in later years.



* Use of the trope in newspaper editorial cartooning is satirized by ''Website/TheOnion's'' "Stan Kelly" (actually, Ward Sutton). In the persona of a cranky conservative, "Kelly" returns again and again to caricatures like the NewAgeRetroHippie ([[https://www.theonion.com/editorial-cartoon-november-17-2008-1819589205 here]]), TeensAreMonsters ([[https://www.theonion.com/editorial-cartoon-march-2-2009-1819589313 here]]), using TheGrimReaper to symbolize disliked trends ([[https://www.theonion.com/editorial-cartoon-october-20-2008-1819589163 throughout]]) and so on. Actually not too far off from the technique of newspaper cartoonist ''Chuck Asay''. And almost ''all'' the comics have the Statue Of Liberty crying (when things are going well for Kelly, she's weeping with joy)

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* Use of the trope in newspaper editorial cartooning is satirized by ''Website/TheOnion's'' "Stan Kelly" (actually, Ward Sutton). In the persona of a cranky conservative, "Kelly" returns again and again to caricatures like the NewAgeRetroHippie ([[https://www.theonion.com/editorial-cartoon-november-17-2008-1819589205 here]]), TeensAreMonsters ([[https://www.theonion.com/editorial-cartoon-march-2-2009-1819589313 here]]), using TheGrimReaper to symbolize disliked trends ([[https://www.theonion.com/editorial-cartoon-october-20-2008-1819589163 throughout]]) and so on. Actually It's actually not too far off from the technique of newspaper cartoonist ''Chuck Asay''. And almost ''all'' the comics have the Statue Of Liberty crying (when things are going well for Kelly, she's weeping with joy)joy).


* ''Creator/RobertJSawyer'' has these in some of his works. Jock, a very conservative former consultant with the RAND Institute in ''Literature/TheNeanderthalParallax'', goes from expressing skepticism over the Neanderthals to [[spoiler: attempting their genocide]]. Meanwhile in ''Quantum Night'', we have a right-wing US President who's quite Islamophobic, [[spoiler: turns out to be a full-on psychopath, and eventually ''invades Canada'']]. Not to mention a Texas governor who passed a law removing all legal rights for illegal aliens (which is actually ridiculously unconstitutional), sparking their mass murders. That, plus the Georgia jury who believe in capital punishment and (even if not everyone agrees on that) reacts in understandable horror after learning the main character (called by the defense to show the defendant is a psychopath, thus he couldn't help killing) favors infanticide for disabled babies. In ''Calculating God'', we have two fanatical anti-abortion, creationist fundamentalist terrorists who try to destroy the Burgess Shall for its conflict with their literalist view of the Bible.

to:

* ''Creator/RobertJSawyer'' has these in some of his works. Jock, a very conservative former consultant with the RAND Institute in ''Literature/TheNeanderthalParallax'', goes from expressing skepticism over the Neanderthals to [[spoiler: attempting their genocide]]. Meanwhile in ''Quantum Night'', we have a right-wing US President who's quite Islamophobic, [[spoiler: turns out to be a full-on psychopath, and eventually ''invades Canada'']]. Not to mention a Texas governor who passed a law removing all legal rights for illegal aliens (which is actually ridiculously unconstitutional), sparking their mass murders. That, plus the Georgia jury who believe in capital punishment and (even if not everyone agrees on that) reacts in understandable horror after learning the main character (called by the defense to show the defendant is a psychopath, thus he couldn't help killing) favors infanticide for disabled babies. In ''Calculating God'', we have two fanatical anti-abortion, creationist fundamentalist terrorists who try to destroy the Burgess Shall Shale for its conflict with their literalist view of the Bible.

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