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* ''Anime/UnderTheDog'' was going to be a full-fledged franchise. After two years of TroubledProduction, they managed to make a 22-minute pilot that was released to middling reviews. Two years later they released an expanded version that performed better but with the people involved having moved on to other works, it's highly unlikely it will ever be revisited.


** The failure of ''Disney Heroes'' can very likely be attributed to the "girly" reputation Disney had earned for itself at that point in time; the term "Disney" had become so heavily associated with princesses, fairy tales and magic castles that they just couldn't shake this image off. Disney movies had become decidedly uncool to young boys, especially at a time where action-fantasy franchises like ''Pokémon'', ''Digimon'', ''Yu-Gi-Oh'' and ''Beyblade'' were viewed by them as substantially more trendy and exciting.

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** The failure of ''Disney Heroes'' can very likely be attributed to the "girly" reputation Disney had earned for itself at that point in time; the term "Disney" had become so heavily associated with princesses, fairy tales and magic castles that they just couldn't shake this image off. Disney movies had become decidedly uncool to young boys, especially at a time where action-fantasy franchises like ''Pokémon'', ''Digimon'', ''Yu-Gi-Oh'' and ''Beyblade'' were viewed by them as substantially more trendy cool and exciting.


** The failure of ''Disney Heroes'' can very likely be attributed to the "girly" reputation Disney had earned for itself at that point in time; the term "Disney" had become so heavily associated with princesses, fairy tales and magic castles that they just couldn't shake this image off. Disney movies had become decidedly uncool to young boys, especially at a time where action-fantasy franchises like ''Pokémon'', ''Digimon'', ''Yu-Gi-Oh'' and ''Beyblade'' were viewed as substantially more attractive and exciting by them.

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** The failure of ''Disney Heroes'' can very likely be attributed to the "girly" reputation Disney had earned for itself at that point in time; the term "Disney" had become so heavily associated with princesses, fairy tales and magic castles that they just couldn't shake this image off. Disney movies had become decidedly uncool to young boys, especially at a time where action-fantasy franchises like ''Pokémon'', ''Digimon'', ''Yu-Gi-Oh'' and ''Beyblade'' were viewed by them as substantially more attractive trendy and exciting by them.exciting.

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** The failure of ''Disney Heroes'' can very likely be attributed to the "girly" reputation Disney had earned for itself at that point in time; the term "Disney" had become so heavily associated with princesses, fairy tales and magic castles that they just couldn't shake this image off. Disney movies had become decidedly uncool to young boys, especially at a time where action-fantasy franchises like ''Pokémon'', ''Digimon'', ''Yu-Gi-Oh'' and ''Beyblade'' were viewed as substantially more attractive and exciting by them.


* [[{{Title1}} The title indicating it is the first in a series]]

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* [[{{Title1}} The title indicating it is the first in a series]]series]].


* ''Matthew Blackheart: Monster Smasher'' is a 2002 TV movie starring Robert Bogue and Christopher Heyerdahl, about [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything a WWII super-soldier frozen in the 1940s and revived in the 1990s, who battles supernatural creatures in New York City]]. Similar (in concept, at least) to ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', it failed to garner any plaudits and no series detailing the further adventures of Blackheart ever appeared.

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* ''Matthew Blackheart: Monster Smasher'' is a 2002 TV movie starring Robert Bogue and Christopher Heyerdahl, Creator/ChristopherHeyerdahl, about [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything a WWII super-soldier frozen in the 1940s and revived in the 1990s, who battles supernatural creatures in New York City]]. Similar (in concept, at least) to ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', it failed to garner any plaudits and no series detailing the further adventures of Blackheart ever appeared.


* The 1999-2000 Russian animated series ''Adventures in the Emerald City'' was supposed to be an adaptation of Creator/LFrankBaum's ''Literature/LandOfOz'' novels. They only got to producing four episodes, adapting the first two books, before the budget ran out and they were unable to secure more funding.
** This might be because the Russians are more familiar with the [[Literature/TalesOfTheMagicLand literary translation by Alexander Volkov]] than the original novel. In fact, Baum's sequels didn't get the same treatment from Volkov as the first novel, as Volkov went on to write his own sequels to the translation, unrelated to Baum's sequels except for the occasional magical artifact or substance.
** Then in 2017 the series got a feature-length sequel based off Volkov's second book. Still unsuccessful.

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* The 1999-2000 Russian animated series ''Adventures in the Emerald City'' was supposed to be an adaptation of Creator/LFrankBaum's ''Literature/LandOfOz'' novels. They only got to producing four episodes, adapting the first two books, before the budget ran out and they were unable to secure more funding.
**
funding. This might be because the Russians are more familiar with the [[Literature/TalesOfTheMagicLand literary translation by Alexander Volkov]] than the original novel. In fact, Baum's sequels didn't get the same treatment from Volkov as the first novel, as Volkov went on to write his own sequels to the translation, unrelated to Baum's sequels except for the occasional magical artifact or substance.
**
substance. Then in 2017 the series got a feature-length sequel based off Volkov's second book. Still unsuccessful.



* Creator/StephenieMeyer's ''Literature/TheHost'' was supposed to start a trilogy of adult science fiction books centered on the Souls. Despite being a bestseller, however, Meyer has apparently given up on the idea.

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* Creator/StephenieMeyer's ''Literature/TheHost'' was supposed to start a trilogy of adult science fiction books centered on the Souls. Despite the novel being a bestseller, however, Meyer has apparently given up on the idea.


** A number of characters which were supposed to be the next generation of heroes. Among them ''ComicBook/{{Sleepwalker}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Darkhawk}}'', ''Super Pro'', and ''ComicBook/TheAwesomeSlapstick''. None of them lasted long, although there have been many attempts to bring them back after years in ComicBookLimbo.

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** A number of characters which were supposed to be the next generation of heroes. Among them ''ComicBook/{{Sleepwalker}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Darkhawk}}'', ''Super Pro'', ''ComicBook/NFLSuperPro'', and ''ComicBook/TheAwesomeSlapstick''. None of them lasted long, although there have been many attempts to bring them back after years in ComicBookLimbo.


* ''WesternAnimation/TheRapsittieStreetKidsBelieveInSanta'' was meant to be the first of a series of TV specials featuring the eponymous kids. The special's... [[NoFlowInCGI questionable]] [[UncannyValley quality]] and poor reception, however, put the kibosh on any of those plans, and the only other planned special starring the eponymous kids known to have existed, an Easter special called ''A Bunny's Tale'', was scrapped and was never heard from again.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheRapsittieStreetKidsBelieveInSanta'' ''WesternAnimation/RapsittieStreetKidsBelieveInSanta'' was meant to be the first of a series of TV specials featuring the eponymous kids. The special's... [[NoFlowInCGI questionable]] [[UncannyValley quality]] and poor reception, however, put the kibosh on any of those plans, and the only other planned special starring the eponymous kids known to have existed, an Easter special called ''A Bunny's Tale'', was scrapped and was never heard from again.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' had several [[http://www.multiversitycomics.com/longform/gargoyles-spin-offs/ spin-offs]] planned, with Disney wanting to make an entire universe akin to Marvel or DC. Some got released as comics by Slave Labor Graphics[[note]]the same company that made the comics that continued after Season 2[[/note]], while others were never released in any form.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' had several [[http://www.multiversitycomics.com/longform/gargoyles-spin-offs/ spin-offs]] planned, with Disney wanting to make an entire universe akin to Marvel or DC. Some got released as comics by Slave Labor Graphics[[note]]the Creator/SlaveLaborGraphics[[note]]the same company that made the comics that continued after Season 2[[/note]], while others were never released in any form.


* After the first episode of ''WebAnimation/ButtonsAdventures'' was posted, [=JanAnimations=] [[ScrewedByTheLawyers got hit with a Cease and Desist from Hasbro's lawyers]]. Plans for as many as ten episodes were put to an abrupt end. After a few years of legal limbo, Jan gave in by posting a sendoff called "[[https://youtu.be/eV2LjonGVIE Game Over]]".

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* After the first episode of ''WebAnimation/ButtonsAdventures'' was posted, [=JanAnimations=] [[ScrewedByTheLawyers got hit with a Cease and Desist from Hasbro's lawyers]]. Plans for as many as ten episodes were put to an abrupt end. After Jan ended the legal limbo a few years of legal limbo, Jan gave in later by posting a sendoff called "[[https://youtu.be/eV2LjonGVIE Game Over]]".

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[[folder:Web Animation]]
* After the first episode of ''WebAnimation/ButtonsAdventures'' was posted, [=JanAnimations=] [[ScrewedByTheLawyers got hit with a Cease and Desist from Hasbro's lawyers]]. Plans for as many as ten episodes were put to an abrupt end. After a few years of legal limbo, Jan gave in by posting a sendoff called "[[https://youtu.be/eV2LjonGVIE Game Over]]".
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[[folder:Film - Animated]]
* After the success of ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' as a CashCowFranchise, Pixar wanted to make ''WesternAnimation/TheGoodDinosaur'' as popular as that franchise with TOMY's toyline based off the movie. However, because the movie was a BoxOfficeBomb and was not received well among the target audience since [[NightmareFuel it had many scary moments]] and was way too [[{{Wangst}} dramatic]] even for Pixar standards, it fizzled away once the movie came to home video.
* The title of ''WesternAnimation/Dougs1stMovie'' strongly implies that it was meant to be the first in a series of movies based on the then-popular ''{{WesternAnimation/Doug}}'' cartoon. At the time, movie adaptations of popular television cartoons was a common trend in animation, having started with the smash success of ''WesternAnimation/TheRugratsMovie'' and having continued with numerous other TV-to-movie adaptations. However, ''{{WesternAnimation/Doug}}'' had already been falling in popularity at the time, having been recently purchased by {{Creator/Disney}} and having had several [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks controversial changes]] applied to it. Moreover, ''WesternAnimation/Dougs1stMovie'' was not even intended to be a feature film, having started its life as a DirectToVideo film based on ''{{WesternAnimation/Doug}}'' before being abruptly moved to theaters [[FollowTheLeader after the aforementioned success of]] ''WesternAnimation/TheRugratsMovie''. As such, while the film was a box office success (owing to its low budget,) it received unfavorable reviews and became the only ''{{WesternAnimation/Doug}}'' movie ever made.
* The direct-to-video film ''Elf Bowling: The Great North Pole Elf Strike'' based on the [[VideoGame/ElfBowling Flash game of the same name]]. The movie advertised a Halloween-themed sequel at the end slated for a 2007 release that never happened due to the movie's very poor reception.
[[/folder]]


In some cases, the start of a stillborn franchise may actually be [[AcclaimedFlop critically]] and/or even financially successful, but complications (such as the creators parting ways with the production company and losing the rights, the creative team focusing on other projects, or, most dramatically, AuthorExistenceFailure) prevent sequels from being made.

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In some cases, the start of a stillborn franchise may actually be [[AcclaimedFlop critically]] and/or even financially [[CriticProof financially]] successful, but complications (such as the creators parting ways with the production company and [[ScrewedByTheLawyers losing the rights, rights]], CreativeDifferences, the creative team focusing on other projects, or, most dramatically, AuthorExistenceFailure) prevent sequels from being made.


* Creator/StephenieMeyer's ''Literature/TheHost'' was supposed to start a trilogy of adult science fiction books centered on the Souls. Despite being a bestseller, however, Meyer has apparently given up on the idea.



* [[Series/HardyBoysNancyDrewMysteries After having a semi-successful series in the seventies]], there have been multiple attempts to adapt the ''Literature/NancyDrew'' and ''[[Literature/TheHardyBoys Hardy Boys]]'' series onto the screen, often as a TV series. Both had a limited 13-episode Canadian adaptation in 1995, but both were quickly cancelled (many feel the biggest factor working against them was the half-hour format, which just doesn't give enough space to set up a good mystery). This happened to Nancy again in 2002, with a made-for-TV movie that would function as a backdoor pilot if ratings were good enough. It wasn't, and after the flop of the 2007 Nancy Drew movie starting Emma Roberts, Hollywood lost interest until 2016 when CBS filmed a pilot for a ''Nancy Drew'' TV procedural that would have portrayed Nancy as a grownup private detective. The pilot was not picked up to series. There was also a failed Nancy Drew TV pilot in the 1950s. The most success she's found on the screen is still arguably the low-budget film series in the late 1930s.

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* [[Series/HardyBoysNancyDrewMysteries After having a semi-successful series in the seventies]], there have been multiple attempts to adapt the ''Literature/NancyDrew'' and ''[[Literature/TheHardyBoys Hardy Boys]]'' series onto the screen, often as a TV series. Success is variable.
**
Both had a limited 13-episode Canadian adaptation in 1995, but both were quickly cancelled (many feel the biggest factor working against them was the half-hour format, which just doesn't give enough space to set up a good mystery). This happened to Nancy again mystery).
** Previously, the Hardy Boys had two Disney serials
in 2002, with the 1950s as part of ''Series/TheMickeyMouseClub'', a failed 1967 TV pilot, and a single-season 1969 SaturdayMorningCartoon. After the 1995 series, there was no more adaptation until 2020, when Creator/{{Hulu}} aired a DarkerAndEdgier adaptation.
** As for Nancy, there was a failed TV pilot in the 1950s, as well as
a made-for-TV movie in 2002 that would function as a backdoor pilot if ratings were good enough. It wasn't, and after enough (they weren't). After the flop of the [[Film/NancyDrew 2007 Nancy Drew movie movie]] starting Emma Roberts, Creator/EmmaRoberts, Hollywood lost interest until 2016 when CBS filmed a pilot for a ''Nancy Drew'' TV procedural that would have portrayed Nancy as a grownup private detective. The detective, but the pilot was not picked up to series. There was also a failed By 2019, however, Nancy Drew has [[Series/NancyDrew2019 an ongoing TV pilot in the 1950s. series]] on The most success she's found on the screen is still arguably the low-budget film series in the late 1930s. CW.


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* Circa 2006, The WB created a PilotMovie adaptation of ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} starring Creator/JustinHartley in the title role. As with the ''Charmed'' spin-off above, because of the creative hurdles surrounding The WB/UPN merger, it was never picked up by The CW and the pilot was ultimately not aired on TV, being relegated to digital media. Hartley would instead star as ComicBook/GreenArrow in ''Series/{{Smallville}}''.

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