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* The ''Oniverse'' games are all solo/co-operative, set in a dream world with an Art Brute aesthetic.
** ''Onirim'' uses a single deck of cards to simulate a Dream maze. The player must make combos or special cards to navigate the maze, find all the door cards, and get out before the deck is empty. Opposing the player are Nightmares that forces card loss, and in general make it more difficult to succeed.
** ''Sylvion'' is a tower defense game, where the cards are arranged form the outline of a grid and the enemy cards move towards the target. Not only is the enemy are self-running, the game also comes with expansions and rules to increase the difficulty.

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* The ''Oniverse'' games are all solo/co-operative, set in a dream world with an Art Brute aesthetic.
** ''Onirim'' uses * All games set in the ''Oniverse'' are solo-player with a single deck of cards to simulate 2-player cooperative variant. Set in a Dream maze. dream world with an Art Brute aesthetic, The Oniverse includes (among others):
** ''Onirim'', a card game where the
player must make combos or special cards uses keys to navigate the maze, find all the door cards, and get out unlock doors before the deck runs out. This task is empty. Opposing complicated with nightmares located throughout the deck, which force the player to choose between several negative effects if drawn. The second edition adds several additional mini-expansions, which can be mixed together or played separately.
** ''Castellion'', a tile-laying game where the player must protect their castle from invaders. Each tile has a special ability, and if the tiles
are Nightmares that forces card loss, in a certain layout, it gives additional bonuses like being able to reorganize tiles or gain additional time before needing to satisfy the level requirements. There are three different levels, each adding an additional layer of complexity, and in general make it more difficult to succeed.
easier/harder variants for each level.
** ''Sylvion'' is (of no relation to [[VideoGame/PokemonXandY "Sylveon"]]), a tower combination deckbuilder/castle defense game, style game where the cards are arranged form player has to organize woodland efforts to save the outline of Sylvan forest's denizens from a grid menacing forest fire. Players draft their deck before trading turns with the game, trying to both extinguish encroaching flames and revitalize the forest that's been already burned. If the blaze becomes too much for the forest to recover after the enemy cards move towards deck is depleted, it's game over.
** ''Nautilion'', a take on roll-and-move where
the target. Not player rolls 3 dice and allots them to either their own submarine, an opposing vessel, and the Darkhouse, which can potentially cause negative events depending on what value was given to it. The player has to make their way across a path to the other side before the opposing sub does, and collect a complete set of crew members on the way, who can only is be placed in certain spots relative to the enemy previous members already on the ship. Fortunately, there are self-running, ways to change results to something more in the game also comes with expansions and rules to increase the difficulty. player's favour.



* All games set in the ''Oniverse'' are solo-player with a 2-player cooperative variant. The Oniverse includes (among others):
** ''Onirim'', a card game where the player uses keys to unlock doors before the deck runs out. This task is complicated with nightmares located throughout the deck, which force the player to choose between several negative effects if drawn. The second edition adds several additional mini-expansions, which can be mixed together or played separately.
** ''Castellion'', a tile-laying game where the player must protect their castle from invaders. Each tile has a special ability, and if the tiles are in a certain layout, it gives additional bonuses like being able to reorganize tiles or gain additional time before needing to satisfy the level requirements. There are three different levels, each adding an additional layer of complexity, and easier/harder variants for each level.
** ''Sylvion'' (of no relation to [[VideoGame/PokemonXandY "Sylveon"]]), a combination deckbuilder/castle defense style game where the player has to organize woodland efforts to save the Sylvan forest's denizens from a menacing forest fire. Players draft their deck before trading turns with the game, trying to both extinguish encroaching flames and revitalize the forest that's been already burned. If the blaze becomes too much for the forest to recover after the enemy deck is depleted, it's game over.
** ''Nautilion'', a take on roll-and-move where the player rolls 3 dice and allots them to either their own submarine, an opposing vessel, and the Darkhouse, which can potentially cause negative events depending on what value was given to it. The player has to make their way across a path to the other side before the opposing sub does, and collect a complete set of crew members on the way, who can only be placed in certain spots relative to the previous members already on the ship. Fortunately, there are ways to change results to something more in the player's favour.


* ''Tiny Epic Galaxies'' has the players in the role of an expanding Space Empire. The retail version includes a solo option, by having several different AI boards. The difficulty of these Rogue Galaxies go from Beginner to ''Epic''.

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* ''Tiny Epic Galaxies'' has All of the players in the role of an expanding Space Empire. The retail version includes ''[[https://www.gamelyngames.com/ Tiny Epic]]'' games include a solo option, by having several different AI boards. The difficulty of these Rogue Galaxies go from Beginner to ''Epic''. boards.

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** Relately, ''TabletopGame/IronswornStarforged'' retains all of the solo support of its predecessor.


* Creator/SteveJacksonGames' ''Literature/FightingFantasy'' books were an early experiment to create single-player TabletopRPG gameplay by mixing it with the {{Gamebooks}} format.

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* Creator/SteveJacksonGames' ''Literature/FightingFantasy'' books were an early experiment to create single-player TabletopRPG gameplay by mixing it with the {{Gamebooks}} format.


But Solo Tabletop Games avert this - they can be played with just one player.

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But Solo Tabletop Games avert this - -- they can be played with just one player.



Whatever the reason, games can make this possible because of their mechanics: dice rolling and separate card decks that determine what sort of challenges or effects that occur. Others provide a solitaire variant, turning a game into a SelfImposedChallenge. Another way is the game comes with a TabletopGameAI - in this case, a set of actions and rules that trigger based on what card is drawn, roll results, or player decisions.

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Whatever the reason, games can make this possible because of their mechanics: dice rolling and separate card decks that determine what sort of challenges or effects that occur. Others provide a solitaire variant, turning a game into a SelfImposedChallenge. Another way is the game comes with a TabletopGameAI - -- in this case, a set of actions and rules that trigger based on what card is drawn, roll results, or player decisions.



Not to be confused with tabletop games based on [[Film/{{Solo}} Solo: A Star Wars Story]].

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Not to be confused with tabletop games based on [[Film/{{Solo}} ''[[Film/{{Solo}} Solo: A Star Wars Story]].Story]]''.


Whatever the reason, games can make this possible because of their mechanics: dice rolling and separate card decks that determine what sort of challenges or effects that occur. Others provide a solitaire variant, turning a game into a SelfImposedChallenge. Another way is the game comes with an "AI" - in this case, a set of actions and rules that trigger based on what card is drawn, roll results, or player decisions.

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Whatever the reason, games can make this possible because of their mechanics: dice rolling and separate card decks that determine what sort of challenges or effects that occur. Others provide a solitaire variant, turning a game into a SelfImposedChallenge. Another way is the game comes with an "AI" a TabletopGameAI - in this case, a set of actions and rules that trigger based on what card is drawn, roll results, or player decisions.

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* ''TabletopGame/SentinelsOfTheMultiverse'' plays with this trope. It's meant to be played with anywhere from three to five people working together, but due to the fact that they're all on one side, there's nothing preventing anyone from simply playing every Hero by themselves. The Villain and Environment are designed to play by themselves, rather than having anything resembling a hand, cards are simply played off the top of Villain and Environment decks at their play phase and according to their rules.


* Solo play is a main play mode of ''TabletopGame/{{Ironsworn}}'', where one person plays a lone hero in a perilous land. The game eschews the need for a gamemaster with oracle tables to roll on and solo principles, aspects that also are useful for guided play.



* Solo play is a main play mode of ''TabletopGame/{{Ironsworn}}'', where one person plays a lone hero in a perilous land. The game eschews the need for a gamemaster with oracle tables to roll on and solo principles, aspects that also are useful for guided play.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Wanderhome}}'' has a section on "journeying solo," permitting a player to play with one's imagination and giving some advice for what works for playing by oneself.

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* Solo play is a main play mode of ''TabletopGame/{{Ironsworn}}'', where one person plays a lone hero in a perilous land. The game eschews the need for a gamemaster with oracle tables to roll on and solo principles, aspects that also are useful for guided play.


* ''Terraforming Mars'' has rules for solo play, where instead of trying to have more points than your opponents when you collectively complete the terraforming process, you try to do the terraforming by yourself in a limited number of generations.

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* ''Terraforming Mars'' ''TableTopGame/StardewValley'' has special rules for a solo player.
* ''TabletopGame/TerraformingMars''
has rules for solo play, where instead of trying to have more points than your opponents when you collectively complete the terraforming process, you try to do the terraforming by yourself in a limited number of generations.


* ''TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}}'' with its many variants, using a deck of standard cards. The Klondike version is the best-known type of solo tabletop game, with many computer variants, including the famous version included with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows starting with version 3.0 in 1990.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}}'' with its many variants, using a deck of standard cards. The Klondike version is the best-known type of solo tabletop game, with many computer variants, including the famous version included with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows starting with version 3.0 in 1990. Some variations like Spider use two decks shuffled together. Others use more or use "stripped" decks.


* ''TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}}'' with its many variants, using a deck of standard cards. The Klondike version is the best-known type of Solo Tabletop.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Solitaire}}'' with its many variants, using a deck of standard cards. The Klondike version is the best-known type of Solo Tabletop. solo tabletop game, with many computer variants, including the famous version included with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows starting with version 3.0 in 1990.


* Creator/SteveJacksonGames' ''Literature/FightingFantasy'' books were an early experiment to create single-player TabletopRPG gameplay by mixing it with the ChooseYourOwnAdventure format.

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* Creator/SteveJacksonGames' ''Literature/FightingFantasy'' books were an early experiment to create single-player TabletopRPG gameplay by mixing it with the ChooseYourOwnAdventure {{Gamebooks}} format.


So why would anyone play them alone? Well, some people could be living in a small town where few share their interest in tabletop gaming. Their schedules might not allow them to attend local tabletop gaming meetups. Others just want to be alone, though many probably just want to get the most use out of their purchases. Most hobby tabletop games cost at least $20 to $60, and some cost $100 or more.

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So why would anyone play them alone? Well, some people could be living in a small town where few share their interest in tabletop gaming. Their schedules might not allow them to attend local tabletop gaming meetups. Some people want the interaction of games as opposed to watching TV or movies, but want to get away from screens. Others just want to be alone, though many probably just want to get the most use out of their purchases. Most hobby tabletop games cost at least $20 to $60, and some cost $100 or more.

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