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** Although in the end it OvertookTheManga (or in this case, book series) and it may not be how the books end, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' showcases in [[GrandFinale its last two episodes]] that [[spoiler:for all of her attempts at not being this, Daenerys Targaryen is no different from her ancestors at all, finally snapping after losing a few too many close ones to the White Walkers and Cersei Lannister and leading a RapePillageAndBurn rampage on King's Landing, with full intent on doing it to the rest of Westeros under the belief that she's "liberating" them. Jon Snow ends up being forced to assassinate her to prevent it.]]

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** Although in the end it OvertookTheManga (or in this case, book series) OvertookTheSeries and it may not be how the books end, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' showcases in [[GrandFinale its last two episodes]] that [[spoiler:for all of her attempts at not being this, Daenerys Targaryen is no different from her ancestors at all, finally snapping after losing a few too many close ones to the White Walkers and Cersei Lannister and leading a RapePillageAndBurn rampage on King's Landing, with full intent on doing it to the rest of Westeros under the belief that she's "liberating" them. Jon Snow ends up being forced to assassinate her to prevent it.]]

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** Although in the end it OvertookTheManga (or in this case, book series) and it may not be how the books end, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' showcases in [[GrandFinale its last two episodes]] that [[spoiler:for all of her attempts at not being this, Daenerys Targaryen is no different from her ancestors at all, finally snapping after losing a few too many close ones to the White Walkers and Cersei Lannister and leading a RapePillageAndBurn rampage on King's Landing, with full intent on doing it to the rest of Westeros under the belief that she's "liberating" them. Jon Snow ends up being forced to assassinate her to prevent it.]]


* UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} routinely had this kind of problem, with great rulers being almost always succeeded with absurdly incompetent ones and not just due to high standard set up by their predecessors. Bolesław Chrobry, the very first king of the country, was followed by his son, Mieszko II, who got booted out of the throne by pagan uprising, was reduced to a duke and lost every single piece of land his father conquered. Casimir III the Great (the only Polish ruler with such nickname) died without a legal heir, so his replacement was first a titular king who never showed up in person and then a teenage girl. Władysław II Jagiełło, a highly successful king of the new dynasty, was followed by his god-awful son, Władysław III, who's biggest achievement was getting himself killed in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Varna the battle of Varna]] - to the point his Polish nickname is "of Varna". Next king, his younger brother, Casimir IV Jagiellon, is widely considered only second best to Casimir the Great... and was followed by ''two'' greatly incompetent sons, Jan and Alexander, both infamous for being utterly incapable of controlling the nobility and constantly folding under any kind of pressure. Their reign, while short-lived (9 and 5 years, respectively), was so terrible, it started the DisasterDominoes leading to Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth becoming a full-blown elective monarchy - and the elective kings also had the fair share of sketchy successors.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} routinely had this kind of problem, with great rulers being almost always succeeded with absurdly incompetent ones and not just due to high standard set up by their predecessors. Bolesław Chrobry, the very first king of the country, was followed by his son, Mieszko II, who got booted out of the throne by pagan uprising, was reduced to a duke and lost every single piece of land his father conquered. Casimir III the Great (the only Polish ruler with such nickname) died without a legal heir, so his replacement was first a titular king who never showed up in person and then a teenage girl. Władysław II Jagiełło, a highly successful king of the new dynasty, was followed by his god-awful son, Władysław III, who's biggest achievement was getting himself killed in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Varna the battle of Varna]] - to the point his Polish nickname is "of Varna". Next king, his younger brother, Casimir IV Jagiellon, is widely considered only second best to Casimir the Great... and was followed by ''two'' greatly incompetent sons, Jan and Alexander, both infamous for being utterly incapable of controlling the nobility and constantly folding under any kind of pressure. Their reign, while short-lived (9 and 5 years, respectively), was so terrible, it started the DisasterDominoes leading to Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth becoming a full-blown elective monarchy ElectiveMonarchy - and the elective kings also had the fair share of sketchy successors.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} routinely had this kind of problem, with great rulers being almost always succeeded with absurdly incompetent ones and not just due to high standard set up by their predecessors. Bolesław Chrobry, the very first king of the country, was followed by his son, Mieszko II, who got booted out of the throne by pagan uprising, was reduced to a duke and lost every single piece of land his father conquered. Casimir III the Great (the only Polish ruler with such nickname) died without a legal heir, so his replacement was first a titular king who never showed up in person and then a teenage girl. Władysław II Jagiełło, a highly successful king of the new dynasty, was followed by his god-awful son, Władysław III, who's biggest achievement was getting himself killed in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Varna the battle of Varna]] - to the point his Polish nickname is "of Varna". Next king, his younger brother, Casimir IV Jagiellon, is widely considered only second best to Casimir the Great... and was followed by ''two'' greatly incompetent sons, Jan and Alexander, both infamous for being utterly incapable of controlling the nobility and constantly folding under any kind of pressure. Their reign, while short-lived (9 and 5 years, respectively), was so terrible, it started the DisasterDominoes leading to Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth becoming a full-blown elective monarchy - and the elective kings also had the fair share of sketchy successors.


* ''VideoGame/MassEffectAndromeda'': This is about the most charitable way to view Jorun Tann, the "Director" of the Andromeda Initiative. He was eighth in line to lead the Initiative, and got his position when all seven leaders above him died. What was he before he was put in charge of colonizing an entirely new galaxy? An accountant. It's clear he's in way over his head, and to his credit he does recognize this. He does appear to honestly be trying his best, but he simply doesn't have the kind of experience or charisma his position requires. His inability to fill the shoes of Jien Garson, the Initiative's founder, is the source of a huge amount of trouble the player has to clean up over the course of the game.
** Jorun is painted is a much more negative light in the prequel novel, where his arrogance and incompetence causes [[spoiler:the repair workers to rebel and ends in the death of the workers' leader, and the protagonist of the book joining the rebels in exile]].

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* ''VideoGame/MassEffectAndromeda'': This is about the most charitable way to view Jorun Jarun Tann, the "Director" of the Andromeda Initiative. He was eighth in line to lead the Initiative, and got his position when all seven leaders above him died. What was he before he was put in charge of colonizing an entirely new galaxy? An accountant. It's clear he's in way over his head, and to his credit he does recognize this. He does appear to honestly be trying his best, but he simply doesn't have the kind of experience or charisma his position requires. His inability to fill the shoes of Jien Garson, the Initiative's founder, is the source of a huge amount of trouble the player has to clean up over the course of the game.
** Jorun Jarun is painted is a much more negative light in the prequel novel, where his arrogance and incompetence causes [[spoiler:the repair workers to rebel and ends in the death of the workers' leader, and the protagonist of the book joining the rebels in exile]].
exile, with Tann only acknowledging the situation ''might'' be ''partly'' his fault when it's all over]].


* Emperor Tiberius was considered this to UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, and another example of ThePeterPrinciple. An extremely skilled general with little interest in politics, Tiberius came to power at an advanced age as a ReluctantRuler with a Senate accustomed to an imperial CultOfPersonality. Following the death of his nephew Germanicus followed by his biological son Drusus, Tiberius retired to a private villa in Capri while letting his NumberTwo, the captain of the PraetorianGuard Sejanus, all but rule Rome in his name. Sejanus proved very unpopular to the people of Rome and instituted a series of purges, before being implicated in a plot to replace Tiberius and being, himself, purged alongside several prominent families who had supported him. Lacking Augustus' CultOfPersonality and personal presence in Rome, these purges (and a series of incursions into Rome's borders in Germania and Asia Minor) left Tiberius wildly unpopular. For all that, Tiberius might have been considered generally competent when looking at the pure numbers (he was emperor for twenty-five years with no CivilWar or major uprising against his rule, and left Rome's finances extremely well off with a giant surplus) had he not appointed the TropeNamer for TheCaligula as his successor. On a meta level he is also the only Julio-Claudian emperor not to have his own Useful Notes page.

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* Emperor Tiberius was considered this to UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, and another example of ThePeterPrinciple. An extremely skilled general with little interest in politics, Tiberius came to power at an advanced age as a ReluctantRuler with a Senate accustomed to an imperial CultOfPersonality. Following the death of his nephew Germanicus followed by his biological son Drusus, Tiberius retired to a private villa in Capri while letting his NumberTwo, the captain of the PraetorianGuard Sejanus, all but rule Rome in his name. Sejanus proved very unpopular to the people of Rome and instituted a series of purges, before being implicated in a plot to replace Tiberius and being, himself, purged alongside several prominent families who had supported him. Lacking Augustus' CultOfPersonality and personal presence in Rome, these purges (and a series of incursions into Rome's borders in Germania and Asia Minor) left Tiberius wildly unpopular. For all that, Tiberius might have been considered generally competent when looking at the pure numbers (he was emperor for twenty-five years with no CivilWar or major uprising against his rule, and left Rome's finances extremely well off with a giant surplus) had he not appointed the TropeNamer for TheCaligula as his successor. On a meta level he is also the only Julio-Claudian emperor not to have his own Useful Notes page.


* Emperor Tiberius was considered this to UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, and another example of ThePeterPrinciple. An extremely skilled general with little interest in politics, Tiberius came to power at an advanced age as a ReluctantRuler with a Senate accustomed to an imperial CultOfPersonality. Following the death of his nephew Germanicus followed by his biological son Drusus, Tiberius retired to a private villa in Capri while letting his NumberTwo, the captain of the PraetorianGuard Sejanus, all but rule Rome in his name. Sejanus proved very unpopular to the people of Rome and instituted a series of purges, before being implicated in a plot to replace Tiberius and being, himself, purged alongside several prominent families who had supported him. Lacking Augustus' CultOfPersonality and personal presence in Rome, these purges (and a series of incursions into Rome's borders in Germania and Asia Minor) left Tiberius wildly unpopular. For all that, Tiberius might have been considered generally competent when looking at the pure numbers (he was emperor for twenty-five years with no CivilWar or major uprising against his rule, and left Rome's finances extremely well off with a giant surplus) had he not appointed the TropeNamer for TheCaligula as his successor.

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* Emperor Tiberius was considered this to UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, and another example of ThePeterPrinciple. An extremely skilled general with little interest in politics, Tiberius came to power at an advanced age as a ReluctantRuler with a Senate accustomed to an imperial CultOfPersonality. Following the death of his nephew Germanicus followed by his biological son Drusus, Tiberius retired to a private villa in Capri while letting his NumberTwo, the captain of the PraetorianGuard Sejanus, all but rule Rome in his name. Sejanus proved very unpopular to the people of Rome and instituted a series of purges, before being implicated in a plot to replace Tiberius and being, himself, purged alongside several prominent families who had supported him. Lacking Augustus' CultOfPersonality and personal presence in Rome, these purges (and a series of incursions into Rome's borders in Germania and Asia Minor) left Tiberius wildly unpopular. For all that, Tiberius might have been considered generally competent when looking at the pure numbers (he was emperor for twenty-five years with no CivilWar or major uprising against his rule, and left Rome's finances extremely well off with a giant surplus) had he not appointed the TropeNamer for TheCaligula as his successor. On a meta level he is also the only Julio-Claudian emperor not to have his own Useful Notes page.



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* Emperor Tiberius was considered this to UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, and another example of ThePeterPrinciple. An extremely skilled general with little interest in politics, Tiberius came to power at an advanced age as a ReluctantRuler with a Senate accustomed to an imperial CultOfPersonality. Following the death of his nephew Germanicus followed by his biological son Drusus, Tiberius retired to a private villa in Capri while letting his NumberTwo, the captain of the PraetorianGuard Sejanus, all but rule Rome in his name. Sejanus proved very unpopular to the people of Rome and instituted a series of purges, before being implicated in a plot to replace Tiberius and being, himself, purged alongside several prominent families who had supported him. Lacking Augustus' CultOfPersonality and personal presence in Rome, these purges (and a series of incursions into Rome's borders in Germania and Asia Minor) left Tiberius wildly unpopular. For all that, Tiberius might have been considered generally competent when looking at the pure numbers (he was emperor for twenty-five years with no CivilWar or major uprising against his rule, and left Rome's finances extremely well off with a giant surplus) had he not appointed the TropeNamer for TheCaligula as his successor.

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* Stefan Uros IV Dusan, a.k.a. Stefan the Strong, turned the Serbian Kingdom into the Serbian Empire, setting it up as the successor to the [[UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire Byzantine Empire]] as the next hegemon of Southeastern Europe. His son, Stefan Uros V a.k.a [[ButtMonkey the Weak]], was well-meaning but could not keep his unruly vassals together, leading to the Serbian Empire's premature demise.


* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' Phoenix King Caledor the Conqueror of the high elves was a great warrior and strategist who kept the kingdom together through the bloody civil war with Malekith's dark elves, oversaw the construction of the Gateway fortresses that remain a fundamental part of Ulthuan's defenses in the present, reclaimed the Blighted Isle, thus ensuring the dark elves can't draw the [[ArtifactOfDoom Sword of Kaine]], and resisted the sword's temptations himself, before finally diving into the sea to drown when his ship was taken by the dark elves. His son Caledor the Warrior was a [[CaptainObvious great warrior]] and...well that's it. His rule is mostly known for a bloody and pointless war with the dwarfs that he ensured (Dark elves attacked a dwarven caravan disguised as high elves. In an unusual show of reasonableness the dwarfs sent an ambassador to talk about this and Caledor responded by ''[[BerserkButton having him shaved]]'' and sending him home in disgrace). The war left thousands on both sides dead, completely cut the high elves off from their mainland colonies, ended with Caledor slain in single combat with the Dwarven king, and ruined any hope of cooperation between the races. This was the first and definitely the last time the elves named the son of the previous Phoenix King as his successor.

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* In ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' Phoenix King Caledor the Conqueror of the high elves was a great warrior and strategist who kept the kingdom together through the bloody civil war with Malekith's dark elves, oversaw the construction of the Gateway fortresses that remain a fundamental part of Ulthuan's defenses in the present, reclaimed the Blighted Isle, thus ensuring the dark elves can't draw the [[ArtifactOfDoom Sword of Kaine]], and resisted the sword's temptations himself, before finally diving into the sea to drown when his ship was taken by the dark elves. His son Caledor the Warrior was a [[CaptainObvious great warrior]] warrior and...well that's it. His rule is mostly known for a bloody and pointless war with the dwarfs that he ensured (Dark elves attacked a dwarven caravan disguised as high elves. In an unusual show of reasonableness the dwarfs sent an ambassador to talk about this and Caledor responded by ''[[BerserkButton having him shaved]]'' and sending him home in disgrace). The war left thousands on both sides dead, completely cut the high elves off from their mainland colonies, ended with Caledor slain in single combat with the Dwarven king, and ruined any hope of cooperation between the races. This was the first and definitely the last time the elves named the son of the previous Phoenix King as his successor.


* ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur'' by Thomas Mallory had as KingArthur's successor a relative nobody named Constantine, the son of one of the lesser knights, no less. Given that, whether historical or legendary, Arthur's Britain was quickly supplanted by the Saxons he opposed, his successor may have had no footprint at all.

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* ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur'' by Thomas Mallory had as KingArthur's Myth/KingArthur's successor a relative nobody named Constantine, the son of one of the lesser knights, no less. Given that, whether historical or legendary, Arthur's Britain was quickly supplanted by the Saxons he opposed, his successor may have had no footprint at all.



** Lord Tywin Lannister regards his son Tyrion this way, regarding him as a drunken lecherous resentful dwarf and refusing to see any of his good points or realise how his own attitude has made Tyrion this way. He refuses to recognise Tyrion as his rightful heir in the hope of getting his other son Jaime into the position instead, despite Jaime not being interested and having his own flaws that Tywin fails to recognise.

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** Lord Tywin Lannister regards his son Tyrion this way, regarding him as a drunken lecherous resentful dwarf and refusing to see any of his good points or realise realize how [[AbusiveParents his own attitude treatment of Tyrion]] has made Tyrion this way. He refuses to recognise recognize Tyrion as his rightful heir in the hope of getting his other son Jaime into the position instead, despite Jaime not being interested and having his own flaws that Tywin fails to recognise.recognize.


** Similarly, Maria Hill, when replacing Nick Fury was this. She always worked within the system, which meant she could never do quite as good a job as Nick. The world went to crap on her watch. She got better over time, but still is very much inferior to Nick.

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** Similarly, Maria Hill, when replacing Nick Fury was this. She always worked within the system, which meant she could never do quite as good a job as Nick. The world went to crap on her watch. She got better over time, but still is very much inferior to Nick. She's ultimately thrown out of SHIELD after [[ComicBook/AvengersStandoff the Pleasant Hill incident]].




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* Poor Elias Acorn of ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog''. He takes over the throne twice and both times loses it. The first time had Elias unwittingly give Geoffery St. John as an advisor, only to become a TreacherousAdvisor as he used his position to punish Sonic and build up his Secret Service. When an Eggman plot ravaged said Secret Service as well as the Sword of Acorns rejecting him, Elias runs away in shame. He comes back again a year later in-series to take back the throne, only to lose it ''again'' to Ixis Naugus.



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* The title character's uncles in ''Theatre/RichardII'' make it clear that they think he is this compared to his grandfather, Edward III, and his father, Edward the Black Prince (who died before he could become king).
* A recurring theme in Shakespeare's ''Theatre/HenryVI'' plays is that (according to most of the characters in the play, at least) the pacifist Henry VI is an unworthy successor to his warlike father, Henry V.


* [[UsefulNotes/KingJohnOfEngland King John "Lackland" of England]] is frequently described as a poor replacement for King UsefulNotes/RichardTheLionheart. The truth is, arguably, that neither was much good; King John may have lost disastrously in France and sparked a (noble, not peasant) revolt in his own lands due to exorbitant taxes, but King Richards punitively expensive crusading was the reason ''why'' King John had to raise those taxes in the first place. And couldn't have done much for John's French campaigns either. John wasn't a ''good'' king by any means, but Richard was arguably just as bad.

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* [[UsefulNotes/KingJohnOfEngland King John "Lackland" of England]] is frequently described as a poor replacement for King UsefulNotes/RichardTheLionheart. The truth is, arguably, that neither was much good; King John may have lost disastrously in France and sparked a (noble, not peasant) revolt in his own lands due to exorbitant taxes, but King Richards Richard's punitively expensive crusading was the reason ''why'' King John had to raise those taxes in the first place. And couldn't have done much for John's French campaigns either. John wasn't a ''good'' king by any means, but Richard was arguably just as bad.



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* ''ComicBook/RobinSeries'': While the Rahul Lama did try to get his grandson more involved in all aspects of the ancient martial and healing art he was the last true master of and keep him involved in training their students after his death his grandson runs the school into the ground. By the time Tim is in Paris again long enough to revisit their martial arts school it has been replaced with a fast food joint and all of Shen's remaining "students" are thugs.

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