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* {{Invoked}|Trope}} in Music/{{Tool}}'s song "Die Eier von Satan". The song is a joke revolving around a cookie recipe, with the last steps before baking being to roll the cookies in powdered sugar then speak the magic words "Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim".

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* {{Invoked}|Trope}} {{Invoked|Trope}} in Music/{{Tool}}'s song "Die Eier von Satan". The song is a joke revolving around a cookie recipe, with the last steps before baking being to roll the cookies in powdered sugar then speak the magic words "Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim".



[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Wrestling/TheGreatKhali. Tigers, sitars, Bollywood dancing, the Mowgli haircut - over his career, his WWE iconography has had it all.


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[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* Wrestling/TheGreatKhali. Tigers, sitars, Bollywood dancing, the Mowgli haircut - over his career, his WWE iconography has had it all.
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[[folder:Music]]
* {{Invoked}|Trope}} in Music/{{Tool}}'s song "Die Eier von Satan". The song is a joke revolving around a cookie recipe, with the last steps before baking being to roll the cookies in powdered sugar then speak the magic words "Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim".


* ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest'': "Sim sim salabim" are the magic words used by Hadji in the original 1964-1965 series, who grew up in a version of this India. He could control snakes by playing his flute, had fakir style powers such as levitation, and incredible skill at hypnotizing others.

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* ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest'': For our purposes the original 1964-1965 series is the TropeNamer, if not maker. "Sim sim salabim" are the magic words used by Hadji in the original 1964-1965 series, Hadji, who grew up in a version of this India. He could control snakes by playing his flute, had fakir style powers such as levitation, and incredible skill at hypnotizing others.


The phrase "Sim sim salabim" itself is an old stock magician's phrase like ''abracadabra'' or ''hocus pocus'', and originally derived from {{Scatting}} within a ''[[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Danish or German]]'' (whichever came first) children's song titled ''Højt på en gren en krage (sad)'', "High on a branch a crow (sat)", or ''Auf einem Baum ein Kuckuck (saß)'', "Upon a tree a cuckoo (sat)". Either way, the original phrase in the song is ''Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim'').

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The phrase "Sim sim salabim" itself is an old stock magician's phrase like ''abracadabra'' or ''hocus pocus'', and originally derived from {{Scatting}} within a ''[[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Danish or German]]'' (whichever came first) children's song titled ''Højt på en gren en krage (sad)'', "High on a branch a crow (sat)", or ''Auf einem Baum ein Kuckuck (saß)'', "Upon a tree a cuckoo (sat)". Either way, the original phrase in the song is ''Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim'').
saladim''.


The phrase "Sim sim salabim" itself is an old stock magician's phrase like ''abracadabra'' or ''hocus pocus'', and originally derived from {{Scatting}} within a ''[[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Danish or German]]'' (whichever came first) children's song titled ''Højt på en gren en krage (sad)'', "High on a branch a crow (sat)", or ''Auf einem Baum ein Kuckuck (saß)'', "Upon a tree a cuckoo (sat)". Either way, the original phrase in the song is ''Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim'').



* ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest'': [[TropeNamer Named for]] the magic words used by Hadji in the original 1964-1965 series, who grew up in a version of this India (though the phrase is an old stock one like ''abracadabra'', and originally derived from {{Scatting}} within a ''[[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Danish]]'' children's song titled ''Højt på en gren en krage'', "High on a Branch a Crow Sat"; the original phrase in the song is ''Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim''). He could control snakes by playing his flute, had fakir style powers such as levitation, and incredible skill at hypnotizing others.

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* ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest'': [[TropeNamer Named for]] "Sim sim salabim" are the magic words used by Hadji in the original 1964-1965 series, who grew up in a version of this India (though the phrase is an old stock one like ''abracadabra'', and originally derived from {{Scatting}} within a ''[[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign Danish]]'' children's song titled ''Højt på en gren en krage'', "High on a Branch a Crow Sat"; the original phrase in the song is ''Sim salabim bumba saladu saladim'').India. He could control snakes by playing his flute, had fakir style powers such as levitation, and incredible skill at hypnotizing others.


* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'': The Kingdoms of Ind, in the far southeast of the Old World, are a fractious land of small kingdoms, deep jungles and many strange gods, a haven for spice traders and home to many elephants and to tribes of tiger-headed {{beast|Man}}men, in contrast to the goat- and sheep-headed varieties prevalent in the western lands. Worthy of note is the fact that the lands of Ind are the only human civilization, aside from the Chaos barbarians in the far north, to officially recognize and permit [[GodOfEvil Tzeentch]] worship.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'': The Kingdoms of Ind, in the far southeast of the Old World, are a fractious land of small kingdoms, deep jungles and many strange gods, a haven for spice traders and home to many elephants and to tribes of tiger-headed {{beast|Man}}men, in contrast to the goat- and sheep-headed varieties prevalent in the western lands. Worthy of note is the fact that the lands of Ind are the only human civilization, aside from the Chaos barbarians in the far north, to officially recognize and permit [[GodOfEvil Tzeentch]] worship.

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* The Jackie Chan movie movie Kung Fu Yoga, despite being hyped up as a joint production between Indian and Chinese studios, ends up overdoing this trope that it makes the James Bond movie tame in comparison. Probably why the movie became a hit in China and flopped badly in India.


At least, that's what fiction tells us. Often, this trope goes hand-in-hand with a case of MistakenNationality and InterchangeableAsianCultures, as India for some reason suddenly takes on [[ArabianNightsDays Arab and Persian characteristics]] in some American films. In some older Hollywood movies, it's not uncommon to see Aladdin and Genies[[note]]Silly, of course, since everyone knows that Aladdin was actually set in ''China''.[[/note]] tossed together with Hindu deities. To be fair, this is TruthInTelevision to an extent as India has a large Muslim population (13.4%, according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki) and was ruled by Islamic kingdoms for century-spanning portions of its history,[[note]]And parts of what used to be considered part of India went on to form the nations of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}} and UsefulNotes/{{Bangladesh}}, which both have majority Muslim populations[[/note]] so it's certainly been more influenced by the Middle East than most Western countries have been. Also, the languages of northern India are mostly Indo-Aryan, making them distantly related to Persian and -- even more distantly -- to English (That's where the term "Indo-European" languages comes from of which Indo-Aryan is a subset just like Germanic).

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At least, that's what fiction tells us. Often, this trope goes hand-in-hand with a case of MistakenNationality and InterchangeableAsianCultures, as India for some reason suddenly takes on [[ArabianNightsDays Arab and Persian characteristics]] in some American films. In some older Hollywood movies, it's not uncommon to see Aladdin and Genies[[note]]Silly, of course, since everyone knows that Aladdin was actually set in ''China''.[[/note]] tossed together with Hindu deities. To be fair, this is TruthInTelevision to an extent as India has a large Muslim population (13.4%, according to Wiki/TheOtherWiki) [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]]) and was ruled by Islamic kingdoms for century-spanning portions of its history,[[note]]And parts of what used to be considered part of India went on to form the nations of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}} and UsefulNotes/{{Bangladesh}}, which both have majority Muslim populations[[/note]] so it's certainly been more influenced by the Middle East than most Western countries have been. Also, the languages of northern India are mostly Indo-Aryan, making them distantly related to Persian and -- even more distantly -- to English (That's where the term "Indo-European" languages comes from of which Indo-Aryan is a subset just like Germanic).



* The Great Khali. Tigers, sitars, Bollywood dancing, the Mowgli haircut - over the past seven years, his WWE iconography has had it all.

to:

* The Great Khali. Wrestling/TheGreatKhali. Tigers, sitars, Bollywood dancing, the Mowgli haircut - over the past seven years, his career, his WWE iconography has had it all.

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* ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' has Dalaam, a vaguely Indian place existing on a FloatingContinent. The mystical training that Prince Poo receives there has strong overtones of UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}}.


* ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' has Great Tiger, a "[[FlexibleTourneyRules boxer]]" who fights with attacks like teleporting and illusions. Partially justified, as Great Tiger is also a StageMagician, and he plays up some of the stereotypes as part of his image as a performer.

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* ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' has Great Tiger, a "[[FlexibleTourneyRules boxer]]" who fights with attacks like teleporting and illusions. Partially justified, as Great Tiger is also a StageMagician, [[StageMagician performs magic for show]], and he presumably plays up some of the stereotypes as part of his image as a performer.image.


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* The Franchise/{{Pokemon}} Medicham plays up aspects of this trope, particularly the pink legs resembling bedlah pants. When it Mega Evolves, it's played up further, as it appears to wear a turban with a big jewel on the front, golden armlets, and teardrop-shaed crystals dangling from the top of said "pants."


* ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' has Great Tiger, a "[[FlexibleTourneyRules boxer]]" who fights with attacks like teleporting and illusions.

to:

* ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' has Great Tiger, a "[[FlexibleTourneyRules boxer]]" who fights with attacks like teleporting and illusions. Partially justified, as Great Tiger is also a StageMagician, and he plays up some of the stereotypes as part of his image as a performer.


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* The skin and song "Whoop-de-doo" in ''VideoGame/{{Lumines}}'' has this as a motif. The song is comprised entirely of traditional Indian instruments and vocal samples, the blocks take the appearance of stones encrusted with pink and green gems, the background is an elaborate doorway leading out into a partially cloudy sunset, and the cursor is a multifoil curtained arch. When played against the AI with this skin, the AI character is an androgynous person whose appearance is inspired by Indian folklorical tapestries.

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[[caption-width-right:350:Just an average day in India...]]
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[[folder:Videogames]]

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[[folder:Videogames]][[folder:Video Games]]



* ''VideoGame/DiddyKongRacing'' has Taj the Blue Elephant Genie , with his trademark stereotypical Indian accent.

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* ''VideoGame/DiddyKongRacing'' has Taj the Blue Elephant Genie , Genie, with his trademark stereotypical Indian accent.

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