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** Sony had also [[WhatCouldHaveBeen planned downloadable [=PS1=] games]] in Japan through the UsefulNotes/PlayStation Broadband Navigator; A complete overhaul of the system's OS and the predecessor to the PlayStation Network including web portal browsing, emails and enhanced save data and title management for the optional internal HDD or an external USB 1.0 HDD. Only one game was released by Konami under the ID of SLBB-00001 but included a full software emulator of the [=PS1=] that was feature complete. It was speculated to have been removed from the service in 2004 due to the emergence of various HDD loader's like [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil HD Loader]] and the growing homebrew scene coupled with the oncoming Slim revision lacking hard drive support. Said homebrew community discovered this emulator years later and modified it into [=POPStarter=] to [[https://www.ps2-home.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=144 install [=PS1=] games to a hard drive]]. This emulator was later recycled for the PSP and it's PS One Classic's series.

to:

** Sony had also [[WhatCouldHaveBeen planned downloadable [=PS1=] games]] in Japan through the UsefulNotes/PlayStation Broadband Navigator; A complete overhaul of the system's OS and the predecessor to the PlayStation Network UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork including web portal browsing, emails and enhanced save data and title management for the optional internal HDD or an external USB 1.0 HDD. Only one game was released by Konami under the ID of SLBB-00001 but included a full software emulator of the [=PS1=] that was feature complete. It was speculated to have been removed from the service in 2004 due to the emergence of various HDD loader's like [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil HD Loader]] and the growing homebrew scene coupled with the oncoming Slim revision lacking hard drive support. Said homebrew community discovered this emulator years later and modified it into [=POPStarter=] to [[https://www.ps2-home.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=144 install [=PS1=] games to a hard drive]]. This emulator was later recycled for the PSP and it's PS One Classic's series.


* More concerned to [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil piracy]], various hackers have modified the Nintendo Mini consoles (NES and SNES) to be able to load other games than the ones already charged as well to run other consoles in their system (the most known case is [[https://www.maxconsole.com/threads/psx-games-now-working-on-nes-classic-mini-edition.44022/ UsefulNotes/PlayStation games running in a NES Mini]]).

to:

* More concerned to [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil piracy]], various hackers have modified the Nintendo Mini consoles (NES and SNES) to be able to load other games than the ones already charged as well to run other consoles in their system (the most known case is [[https://www.maxconsole.com/threads/psx-games-now-working-on-nes-classic-mini-edition.44022/ UsefulNotes/PlayStation PlayStation games running in a NES Mini]]).



** Sony had also [[WhatCouldHaveBeen planned downloadable [=PS1=] games]] in Japan through the PlayStation Broadband Navigator; A complete overhaul of the system's OS and the predecessor to the PlayStation Network including web portal browsing, emails and enhanced save data and title management for the optional internal HDD or an external USB 1.0 HDD. Only one game was released by Konami under the ID of SLBB-00001 but included a full software emulator of the [=PS1=] that was feature complete. It was speculated to have been removed from the service in 2004 due to the emergence of various HDD loader's like [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil HD Loader]] and the growing homebrew scene coupled with the oncoming Slim revision lacking hard drive support. Said homebrew community discovered this emulator years later and modified it into [=POPStarter=] to [[https://www.ps2-home.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=144 install [=PS1=] games to a hard drive]]. This emulator was later recycled for the PSP and it's PS One Classic's series.

to:

** Sony had also [[WhatCouldHaveBeen planned downloadable [=PS1=] games]] in Japan through the PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation Broadband Navigator; A complete overhaul of the system's OS and the predecessor to the PlayStation Network including web portal browsing, emails and enhanced save data and title management for the optional internal HDD or an external USB 1.0 HDD. Only one game was released by Konami under the ID of SLBB-00001 but included a full software emulator of the [=PS1=] that was feature complete. It was speculated to have been removed from the service in 2004 due to the emergence of various HDD loader's like [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil HD Loader]] and the growing homebrew scene coupled with the oncoming Slim revision lacking hard drive support. Said homebrew community discovered this emulator years later and modified it into [=POPStarter=] to [[https://www.ps2-home.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=144 install [=PS1=] games to a hard drive]]. This emulator was later recycled for the PSP and it's PS One Classic's series.


* More concerned to [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil piracy]], various hackers have modified the Nintendo Mini consoles (NES and SNES) to be able to load other games than the ones already charged as well to run other consoles in their system (the most known case is [[https://www.maxconsole.com/threads/psx-games-now-working-on-nes-classic-mini-edition.44022/ PlayStation games running in a NES Mini]]).

to:

* More concerned to [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil piracy]], various hackers have modified the Nintendo Mini consoles (NES and SNES) to be able to load other games than the ones already charged as well to run other consoles in their system (the most known case is [[https://www.maxconsole.com/threads/psx-games-now-working-on-nes-classic-mini-edition.44022/ PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation games running in a NES Mini]]).


* Early [=SKUs=] of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 came with the Emotion Engine (CPU) and the Graphic Synthesizer (GPU) from the PlayStation 2, allowing people to play [=PS2=] games on the console; this was shortly removed in later units and replaced with [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} software emulation]] of the [=PS2=] hardware, which had issues running some games. Eventually, all [=PS2=] compatibility was left out for later models. Though [=PS1=] software emulation is supported across all models. Later on [=PS2=] and PSP software emulation was added for use in the downloadable [=PS2=] Classic's and PSP Mini's.

to:

* Early [=SKUs=] of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 came with the Emotion Engine (CPU) and the Graphic Synthesizer (GPU) from the PlayStation 2, UsefulNotes/PlayStation2, allowing people to play [=PS2=] games on the console; this was shortly removed in later units and replaced with [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} software emulation]] of the [=PS2=] hardware, which had issues running some games. Eventually, all [=PS2=] compatibility was left out for later models. Though [=PS1=] software emulation is supported across all models. Later on [=PS2=] and PSP software emulation was added for use in the downloadable [=PS2=] Classic's and PSP Mini's.


* Applications written for middleware like Java or Flash Player are generally guaranteed to run on any platform that has a working copy of that middleware installed. This is how ''VideoGame/Minecraft'' was able to have working Mac and Linux ports from day one. You could even play Flash games on the Wii through its built-in web browser (and, presumably, still can, provided they were made for Flash Player 7 or older and are still online).

to:

* Applications written for middleware like Java or Flash Player are generally guaranteed to run on any platform that has a working copy of that middleware installed. This is how ''VideoGame/Minecraft'' ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' was able to have working Mac and Linux ports from day one. You could even play Flash games on the Wii through its built-in web browser (and, presumably, still can, provided they were made for Flash Player 7 or older and are still online).


* After many years being outnumbered by Microsoft in every of their Xbox consoles and after years of petitions, it was stated that the UsefulNotes/PlayStation5 will be [[https://www.thegamer.com/sony-confirms-playstation-5-backwards-compatible/ backwards compatible with PS4]].

to:

* After many years being outnumbered by Microsoft in every of their Xbox consoles and after years of petitions, it was stated that the UsefulNotes/PlayStation5 will be [[https://www.thegamer.com/sony-confirms-playstation-5-backwards-compatible/ backwards compatible with PS4]]. However, developers can choose to make [=PS4=] games incompatible with the [=PS5=], which Konami did with P.T.

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** Creator/ValveSoftware has taken this further by incorporating a WINE-based subsystem right into Steam on Linux. Called Proton internally and "[=SteamPlay=]" in marketing, it allows a ridiculous number of Windows games to run with minimal issues and minimal user involvement. A growing number of games are even "whitelisted" as being guaranteed to work out of the box.


Added DiffLines:

* Applications written for middleware like Java or Flash Player are generally guaranteed to run on any platform that has a working copy of that middleware installed. This is how ''VideoGame/Minecraft'' was able to have working Mac and Linux ports from day one. You could even play Flash games on the Wii through its built-in web browser (and, presumably, still can, provided they were made for Flash Player 7 or older and are still online).


* One of the features mentioned in the upcoming Xbox console line for 2020, consisting of the [[UsefulNotes/XboxSeriesXAndS Xbox Series X and Series S]], is to continue with the backward compatibility with the Xbox One games and the previous two consoles, with the exception of games that use the Kinect accessory.

to:

* One of the features mentioned in the upcoming Xbox console line for 2020, consisting of the [[UsefulNotes/XboxSeriesXAndS Xbox Series X and Series S]], is to continue with the backward compatibility with the Xbox One games and Xbox One compatible games from the previous two consoles, with the exception of games that use the Kinect accessory.


* One of the features mentioned in the upcoming Xbox console for 2020, the UsefulNotes/XboxSeriesX, is to continue with the backward compatibility with the Xbox One games and the previous two consoles, with the exception of games that use the Kinect accessory.

to:

* One of the features mentioned in the upcoming Xbox console line for 2020, consisting of the UsefulNotes/XboxSeriesX, [[UsefulNotes/XboxSeriesXAndS Xbox Series X and Series S]], is to continue with the backward compatibility with the Xbox One games and the previous two consoles, with the exception of games that use the Kinect accessory.


** One of the features mentioned in the upcoming Xbox console for 2020, the Xbox Series X, is to continue with the backward compatibility with the Xbox One games and the previous two consoles.

to:

** * One of the features mentioned in the upcoming Xbox console for 2020, the Xbox Series X, UsefulNotes/XboxSeriesX, is to continue with the backward compatibility with the Xbox One games and the previous two consoles.consoles, with the exception of games that use the Kinect accessory.



* After many years being outnumbered by Microsoft in every of their Xbox consoles and after years of petitions, it was stated that [=PlayStation=] 5 will be [[https://www.thegamer.com/sony-confirms-playstation-5-backwards-compatible/ backwards compatible with PS4]].

to:

* After many years being outnumbered by Microsoft in every of their Xbox consoles and after years of petitions, it was stated that [=PlayStation=] 5 the UsefulNotes/PlayStation5 will be [[https://www.thegamer.com/sony-confirms-playstation-5-backwards-compatible/ backwards compatible with PS4]].


* Early [=SKUs=] of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 came with the Emotion Engine (CPU) and the Graphic Synthesizer (GPU) from the PlayStation 2, allowing to play [=PS2=] games on the console; this was shortly removed in later units and replaced with [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} software emulation]] of the [=PS2=] hardware, which had issues running some games. Eventually, all [=PS2=] compatibility was left out for later models. Though [=PS1=] software emulation is supported across all models. Later on [=PS2=] and PSP software emulation was added for use in the downloadable [=PS2=] Classic's and PSP Mini's.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 was able to play UsefulNotes/PlayStation games thanks to including several of it's system's processor's; Namely the main R3000 CPU which was used as the I/O processor and the SPU which was used for sound prcessing. The GPU was emulated on the [=PS2's=] Emotion Engine. You could even use [=PS1=] controller's and memory cards without issue although the original memory card's are needed for saving game data as the [=PS2=] Memory Card's were incompatible ([=PS1=] games can't write to them.) Later Slim models replaced the IOP processor with a custom [=PowerPC=] based chip known as Deckard which not only reduced [=PS1=] game compatibility but ''[=PS2=] game compatibility as well.''

to:

* Early [=SKUs=] of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 came with the Emotion Engine (CPU) and the Graphic Synthesizer (GPU) from the PlayStation 2, allowing people to play [=PS2=] games on the console; this was shortly removed in later units and replaced with [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} software emulation]] of the [=PS2=] hardware, which had issues running some games. Eventually, all [=PS2=] compatibility was left out for later models. Though [=PS1=] software emulation is supported across all models. Later on [=PS2=] and PSP software emulation was added for use in the downloadable [=PS2=] Classic's and PSP Mini's.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 was able to play UsefulNotes/PlayStation games thanks to including several of it's its system's processor's; processors; Namely the main R3000 CPU which was used as the I/O processor and the SPU which was used for sound prcessing.processing. The GPU was emulated on the [=PS2's=] Emotion Engine. You could even use [=PS1=] controller's and memory cards without issue although the original memory card's cards are needed for saving game data as the [=PS2=] Memory Card's memory cards were incompatible ([=PS1=] games can't write to them.) Later Slim models replaced the IOP processor with a custom [=PowerPC=] based chip known as Deckard which not only reduced [=PS1=] game compatibility but ''[=PS2=] game compatibility as well.''


* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 was able to play UsefulNotes/PlayStation games thanks to including several of it's system's processor's; Namely the main R3000 CPU which was used as the I/O processor and the SPU which was used for sound prcessing. The GPU was emulated on the [=PS2's=] Emotion Engine. You could even use [=PS1=] controller's and memory cards without issue although the original memory card's are neeed for saving game data as the [=PS2=] Memory Card's were incompatible. Later Slim models replaced the IOP processor with a custom [=PowerPC=] based chip known as Deckard which not only reduced [=PS1=] game compatibility but ''[=PS2=] game compatibility as well.''

to:

* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 was able to play UsefulNotes/PlayStation games thanks to including several of it's system's processor's; Namely the main R3000 CPU which was used as the I/O processor and the SPU which was used for sound prcessing. The GPU was emulated on the [=PS2's=] Emotion Engine. You could even use [=PS1=] controller's and memory cards without issue although the original memory card's are neeed needed for saving game data as the [=PS2=] Memory Card's were incompatible. incompatible ([=PS1=] games can't write to them.) Later Slim models replaced the IOP processor with a custom [=PowerPC=] based chip known as Deckard which not only reduced [=PS1=] game compatibility but ''[=PS2=] game compatibility as well.''


** The UsefulNotes/Atari5200 also had an add-on module for Atari 2600 games.

to:

** The UsefulNotes/Atari5200 also had an add-on module for Atari 2600 games.games known as the CX-55 2600 Adapter. This rather clumsy add-on contained the entire 2600 hardware on board including 2 extra controller ports for the otherwise incompatible [=DB9=] joysticks. Further complicating matters is the fact this adapter only works on later 2 port units and not the original 4 port consoles without being modified. This caused Atari to start scraping the 4 port consoles until one of their service engineers by the name of Gary Rubio discovered the simple mod to correct the issue.



* First came up the UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem which, through the UsefulNotes/SuperGameBoy adapter, was able to use UsefulNotes/GameBoy cartridges in order to play them on the TV and even enhance them as some games included colour data exclusively for this use.

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* First came up the UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem which, through the UsefulNotes/SuperGameBoy adapter, was able to use UsefulNotes/GameBoy cartridges in order to play them on the TV and even enhance them as some games included colour data exclusively for this use.use on the Super Game Boy such as custom color palettes. More extravagant but seldom used features include SNES quality music tracks and in one special case A port of VideoGame/SpaceInvaders contains an ''[[GameWithinAGame entire SNES port of the game]]'' on the Game Boy cartridge that will only work when inserted into a Super Game Boy. Nintendo later re-released the Super Game Boy as the [[UpdatedReRelease Super Game Boy 2]] in 1998 [[NoExportForYou exclusively to Japan]] which added a link port and fixed an issue with the original where games ran at 2.4% faster than normal due to the clock speed being divided by the SNES' clock and not the Game Boy's.



* The UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance included the '''entire''' hardware of the UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor inside, thus allowing it to play both Game Boy and Game Boy Color games in addition to GBA ones. There's the ARM processor for new games, and the [=Z80=] processor for old ones. This system also allowed to play the games stretched in order to fit the wider GBA screen. Multiplayer worked in old games, if you used the old link cable, not the new GBA link cable.
* The next adapter was the UsefulNotes/GameBoyPlayer for the UsefulNotes/GameCube. This one was as good as a GBA, playing single-player Game Boy, Game Boy Color and Game Boy Advance games, all on the TV. (Don't confuse it with the Nintendo [=GameCube=]-Game Boy Advance link cable.)
* Keeping up with its predecessor, the original and lite variants of the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS had a GBA cartridge slot as well as most of its hardware. This played single-player GBA games (but not older Game Boy Color games). The GBA slot also enabled other features in specific DS games, mostly Pokémon ones, where it enabled players to bring Pokémon from the GBA games into the DS installments. The slot and hardware of the GBA were removed in the [=DSi=] and the [=DSi=] XL.
* Given that the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} was not inaccurately described as "Two [[UsefulNotes/{{Gamecube}} GameCubes]] duct-taped together", it was fairly trivial for Nintendo to implement full backwards compatibility. The Wii has four [=GameCube=] controller slots and two memory cards located on top of the console, and these were required - [=GameCube=] games on Wii did not support Wii Remotes or Classic Controllers. On the plus side, though, [=GameCube=] controllers could be used with a multitude of Wii games - annoyingly, though, the actual Wii menu itself didn't come with support, forcing the use of a Wii Remote just to start the game. It also lacks support for the UsefulNotes/GameBoyPlayer and broadband adapter. In spite of these flaws, the Wii is still generally a preferred option for playing [=GameCube=] games today, due to the Wii itself being dirt cheap, component cables for [=GameCube=] being very rare and expensive, and it being [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil much easier to pirate games on Wii compared to GameCube.]]

to:

* The UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance included the '''entire''' hardware of the UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor inside, thus allowing it to play both Game Boy and Game Boy Color games in addition to GBA ones. There's the ARM [=ARM7=] processor for new games, and the [=Z80=] processor for old ones. ones and to act as a sound processor. (Although very few if any games used the Z80 in this fashion and instead used the faster ARM CPU for software audio mixing) This system also allowed to play the games stretched in order to fit the wider GBA screen. Multiplayer worked in old games, if you used the old link cable, not the new GBA link cable.
* A seldom known series of adapters known as the [=WideBoy 64=] was developed by Creator/IntelligentSystems for the UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 for game developer's and journalists to test games on a TV and make it easier to take screenshots. The first revision supports Game Boy and Game Boy Color and the second revision added GBA support. Finding one nowadays for a [[CrackIsCheaper reasonable price]] is a game in and of itself.
* The next adapter was the UsefulNotes/GameBoyPlayer for the UsefulNotes/GameCube. This one was as good as a GBA, contains the entire GBA hardware, playing single-player Game Boy, Game Boy Color and Game Boy Advance games, all on the TV.TV and much like it's predecessor several GBA games had enhanced features when used on the Game Boy Player such as less washed out color palettes and rumble support for the controller. (Don't confuse it with the Nintendo [=GameCube=]-Game Boy Advance link cable.)
) The only GBA games that refuse to run are the Game Boy Advance Video series of cartridges due to concerns from Nintendo people would record the [[SarcasmMode high quality video's]] with a VHS or DVD recorder.
**Datel (The manufacturer of the [=GameShark=] and the [=Action Replay=] series of cheat devices) released their own GBA adapter known as the Advance Game Port. This would plug into the Memory Card slot of a [=GameCube=] and use a disc containing a software emulator to run GBA cartridges plugged into the Memory Card slot adapter. (It does not support either Game Boy or Game Boy Color cartridges) This perculiar setup also meant it was forward compatible with the Wii although the quality of the emulator is [[PortingDisaster questionable at best.]]

* Keeping up with its predecessor, the original and lite variants of the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS had a GBA cartridge slot as well as most of its hardware.hardware bar the Z80 CPU. This played single-player GBA games (but not older Game Boy Color games). The GBA slot also enabled other features in specific DS games, mostly Pokémon ones, where it enabled players to bring Pokémon from the GBA games into the DS installments. The slot and hardware of the GBA were removed in the [=DSi=] and the [=DSi=] XL.
* Given that the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} was not inaccurately described as "Two [[UsefulNotes/{{Gamecube}} GameCubes]] duct-taped together", it was fairly trivial for Nintendo to implement full backwards compatibility. This was achieved with a compatability layer known as ''MIOS'' which lowered the Wii's CPU and GPU clock speeds down to the [=GameCube's=] original speeds and limiting the available amount of RAM as well as patch any problematic games before launching them. The Wii has four [=GameCube=] controller slots and two memory cards located on top of the console, and these were required - [=GameCube=] games on Wii did not support Wii Remotes or Classic Controllers. On the plus side, though, [=GameCube=] controllers could be used with a multitude of Wii games - annoyingly, though, the actual Wii menu itself didn't come with support, forcing the use of a Wii Remote just to start the game. It also lacks support for the UsefulNotes/GameBoyPlayer and broadband adapter. In spite of these flaws, the Wii is still generally a preferred option for playing [=GameCube=] games today, due to the Wii itself being dirt cheap, component cables for [=GameCube=] being very rare and expensive, and it being [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil much easier to pirate games on Wii compared to GameCube.]]



* The UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS plays DS games (and UsefulNotes/DSiWare) with no problem.
* The UsefulNotes/WiiU keeps Wii compatibility but loses [=GameCube=] compatibility. Wii game discs, Wii remotes and so on still work, but you can no longer use [=GameCube=] controllers in Wii games.

to:

* The UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS plays DS games (and UsefulNotes/DSiWare) with no problem.
problem. Every 3DS also has the ability to run GBA games through a hidden software layer known as AGB_FIRM used for the Ambassador Titles and custom injections on homebrewed system's.
* The UsefulNotes/WiiU keeps Wii compatibility using a similar method as it's predecessor but loses [=GameCube=] compatibility. Wii game discs, Wii remotes and so on still work, but you can no longer use [=GameCube=] controllers in Wii games. The [=Wii U=] has a seperate 512MB NAND memory chip for Wii save data and downloadable titles.



* Early [=SKUs=] of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 came with the Emotion Engine (CPU) and the Graphic Synthesizer (GPU) from the PlayStation 2, allowing to play [=PS2=] games on the console; this was shortly removed in later units and replaced with [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} software emulation]] of the [=PS2=] hardware, which had issues running some games. Eventually, all [=PS2=] compatibility was left out for later models. Though [=PS1=] software emulation is supported across all models.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 was not only able to play UsefulNotes/PlayStation games, thanks to including that system's processor (which wasn't removed due to [=PS2=] games using it for sound processing), but also you were able to use your [=PS1=] memory cards & joysticks.
* Though the UsefulNotes/PlaystationPortable can't fit [=PS1=] discs, it can run [=PSOne Classic=] games from a built in emulator.

to:

* Early [=SKUs=] of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 came with the Emotion Engine (CPU) and the Graphic Synthesizer (GPU) from the PlayStation 2, allowing to play [=PS2=] games on the console; this was shortly removed in later units and replaced with [[UsefulNotes/{{Emulation}} software emulation]] of the [=PS2=] hardware, which had issues running some games. Eventually, all [=PS2=] compatibility was left out for later models. Though [=PS1=] software emulation is supported across all models.
models. Later on [=PS2=] and PSP software emulation was added for use in the downloadable [=PS2=] Classic's and PSP Mini's.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 was not only able to play UsefulNotes/PlayStation games, games thanks to including that several of it's system's processor's; Namely the main R3000 CPU which was used as the I/O processor (which wasn't removed due to [=PS2=] games using it and the SPU which was used for sound processing), but also you were able to prcessing. The GPU was emulated on the [=PS2's=] Emotion Engine. You could even use your [=PS1=] controller's and memory cards & joysticks.
without issue although the original memory card's are neeed for saving game data as the [=PS2=] Memory Card's were incompatible. Later Slim models replaced the IOP processor with a custom [=PowerPC=] based chip known as Deckard which not only reduced [=PS1=] game compatibility but ''[=PS2=] game compatibility as well.''
** Sony had also [[WhatCouldHaveBeen planned downloadable [=PS1=] games]] in Japan through the PlayStation Broadband Navigator; A complete overhaul of the system's OS and the predecessor to the PlayStation Network including web portal browsing, emails and enhanced save data and title management for the optional internal HDD or an external USB 1.0 HDD. Only one game was released by Konami under the ID of SLBB-00001 but included a full software emulator of the [=PS1=] that was feature complete. It was speculated to have been removed from the service in 2004 due to the emergence of various HDD loader's like [[DigitalPiracyIsEvil HD Loader]] and the growing homebrew scene coupled with the oncoming Slim revision lacking hard drive support. Said homebrew community discovered this emulator years later and modified it into [=POPStarter=] to [[https://www.ps2-home.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=144 install [=PS1=] games to a hard drive]]. This emulator was later recycled for the PSP and it's PS One Classic's series.

* Though the UsefulNotes/PlaystationPortable can't fit [=PS1=] discs, it can run [=PSOne Classic=] games from a built in emulator.emulator known as POPS.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationVita contains the PSP's R4000 CPU for playing downloadable PSP games. the Media Engine GPU, DSP and security co-processor's are all done via software emulation.


* 64-bit Windows 10 running on ARM is compatible with 32-bit x86 applications.

to:

* 64-bit Windows 10 running on ARM is compatible with 32-bit x86 applications.applications using emulation.

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* 64-bit Windows 10 running on ARM is compatible with 32-bit x86 applications.

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