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* ''Anime/InuXBokuSS'' due to the art style, heaping helpings of pretty boys, and many, many shojo tropes, one would be forgiven for thinking this was a shojo, though it was actually published in a Shonen publication. Most of Cocoa Fujiwara's works, including ''Manga/{{Dear}}'' are like this.

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* ''Anime/InuXBokuSS'' due to the art style, heaping helpings of pretty boys, and many, many shojo tropes, one would be forgiven for thinking this was a shojo, though it was actually published in a Shonen publication. Most of Cocoa Fujiwara's works, including ''Manga/{{Dear}}'' ''Manga/{{Dear}}'', are like this.

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* ''Anime/InuXBokuSS'' due to the art style, heaping helpings of pretty boys, and many, many shojo tropes, one would be forgiven for thinking this was a shojo, though it was actually published in a Shonen publication. Most of Cocoa Fujiwara's works, including ''Manga/{{Dear}}'' are like this.


* ''Kono Oto Tomare!'' gets this a lot for havjng a watercolour art style reminiscent of stereotypical shoujo and its character drama focused plot, but the manga runs in ''Jump Square''.

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* ''Kono Oto Tomare!'' gets this a lot for havjng having a watercolour art style reminiscent of stereotypical shoujo and its character drama focused plot, but the manga runs in ''Jump Square''.

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* ''Kono Oto Tomare!'' gets this a lot for havjng a watercolour art style reminiscent of stereotypical shoujo and its character drama focused plot, but the manga runs in ''Jump Square''.


* ''[[Manga/{{HoriMiya}} Hori-san and Miyamura-kun]]'' - Despite running in a shonen magazine in its print run, it focus heavily on the romantic relationships between the cast members, and the art style does have some of the usual conventions of the genre.

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* ''[[Manga/{{HoriMiya}} Hori-san and Miyamura-kun]]'' - Despite running in a shonen magazine in its print run, it focus focuses heavily on the romantic relationships between the cast members, and the art style does have some of the usual conventions of the genre.this demographic.


** ''TheCaseStudyOfVanitas'' was published in [=GanGan Joker=], which is neutral.

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** ''TheCaseStudyOfVanitas'' ''Manga/TheCaseStudyOfVanitas'' was published in [=GanGan Joker=], ''[=GanGan Joker=]'', which is neutral.

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* The works of Jun Mochizuki are often subjected to this treatment due to their art style:
** ''TheCaseStudyOfVanitas'' was published in [=GanGan Joker=], which is neutral.
** ''Manga/PandoraHearts''


While a lot of this demographic's manga output does get adapted into anime of varying popularity, its real foothold is in a medium even its brother demographic had a hard time attracting viewers: LiveActionTV. As their romance and contemporary series tend to match up with common trends in tv serials, ''Shōjo'' and ''Jōsei'' manga adaptations tend to make up a sizeable portion of Japanese {{Dorama}}s. In fact, it may find more popularity through its Dorama version than its life as a manga.

to:

While a lot of this demographic's manga output does get adapted into anime of varying popularity, its real foothold is in a medium even its brother demographic had a hard time attracting viewers: LiveActionTV. As their romance and contemporary series tend to match up with common trends in tv serials, ''Shōjo'' and ''Jōsei'' ''Josei'' manga adaptations tend to make up a sizeable portion of Japanese {{Dorama}}s. In fact, it may find more popularity through its Dorama version than its life as a manga.


Not all romance series are ''Shōjo''. ''{{Shonen}}'' romances take the boy's perspective ({{Magical Girlfriend}}s and HaremSeries are both common, though there are just as many mundane one-to-one stories), and focus on the boy pursuing the girl, or trying to resolve the LoveDodecahedron. If it doesn't have that, a ''Shōnen'' romance tends to ''end'' with a declaration of love and its acceptance. ''Shōjo'' romances, by contrast, frequently involve the [[SmittenTeenageGirl heroine finding love early]] in the series, then stick around to watch the couple work through trouble in their relationship. Shoujo romances with male leads often tread somewhere in between: sometimes it takes the ''Shōnen'' route of the chase, others focus on how the boy treats his newfound lover.

to:

Not all romance series are ''Shōjo''. ''{{Shonen}}'' romances take the boy's perspective ({{Magical Girlfriend}}s and HaremSeries are both common, though there are just as many mundane one-to-one stories), and focus on the boy pursuing the girl, or trying to resolve the LoveDodecahedron. If it doesn't have that, a ''Shōnen'' romance tends to ''end'' with a declaration of love and its acceptance. ''Shōjo'' romances, by contrast, frequently involve the [[SmittenTeenageGirl heroine finding love early]] in the series, then stick around to watch the couple work through trouble in their relationship. Shoujo ''Shōjo'' romances with male leads often tread somewhere in between: sometimes it takes the ''Shōnen'' route of the chase, others focus on how the boy treats his newfound lover.


Added DiffLines:

While a lot of this demographic's manga output does get adapted into anime of varying popularity, its real foothold is in a medium even its brother demographic had a hard time attracting viewers: LiveActionTV. As their romance and contemporary series tend to match up with common trends in tv serials, ''Shōjo'' and ''Jōsei'' manga adaptations tend to make up a sizeable portion of Japanese {{Dorama}}s. In fact, it may find more popularity through its Dorama version than its life as a manga.


!!Examples:

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!!Examples:
[[folder:Popular Magazines]]


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* ''Cheese!''
* ''Ciao''
* ''Magazine/HanaToYume''
* ''Magazine/{{Nakayoshi}}''
* ''[=LaLa=]''
* ''Margaret''
* ''Ribon''
* ''Sho-Comi'' (originally ''Shoujo Comic'')
[[/index]]
[[/folder]]
!!Examples:

[[index]]


Not all romance series are ''Shōjo''. ''{{Shonen}}'' romances take the boy's perspective ({{Magical Girlfriend}}s and HaremSeries are both common), and focus on the boy pursuing the girl, or trying to resolve the LoveDodecahedron. If it doesn't have that, a ''Shōnen'' romance tends to ''end'' with a declaration of love and its acceptance. ''Shōjo'' romances, by contrast, frequently involve the [[SmittenTeenageGirl heroine finding love early]] in the series, then stick around to watch the couple work through trouble in their relationship. Shoujo romances with male leads often tread somewhere in between: sometimes it takes the ''Shōnen'' route of the chase, others focus on how the boy treats his newfound lover.

to:

Not all romance series are ''Shōjo''. ''{{Shonen}}'' romances take the boy's perspective ({{Magical Girlfriend}}s and HaremSeries are both common), common, though there are just as many mundane one-to-one stories), and focus on the boy pursuing the girl, or trying to resolve the LoveDodecahedron. If it doesn't have that, a ''Shōnen'' romance tends to ''end'' with a declaration of love and its acceptance. ''Shōjo'' romances, by contrast, frequently involve the [[SmittenTeenageGirl heroine finding love early]] in the series, then stick around to watch the couple work through trouble in their relationship. Shoujo romances with male leads often tread somewhere in between: sometimes it takes the ''Shōnen'' route of the chase, others focus on how the boy treats his newfound lover.

Added DiffLines:



Not all romance series are ''Shōjo''. ''{{Shonen}}'' romances take the boy's perspective ({{Magical Girlfriend}}s and HaremSeries are both common), and focus on the boy pursuing the girl, or trying to resolve the LoveDodecahedron. If it doesn't have that, a ''Shōnen'' romance tends to ''end'' with a declaration of love and its acceptance. ''Shōjo'' romances, by contrast, frequently involve the [[SmittenTeenageGirl heroine finding love early]] in the series, then stick around to watch the couple work through trouble in their relationship. Conversely, not all ''Shōjo'' series are romance either; some may just focus on dealing with everyday issues, others with uncovering mysteries, others where the action gets graphic or cerebral, and still others that like to take the [[SliceOfLife scenic route of life]]. And there's been times where ''Shōjo'' can get as bold-faced and crass as any ''Shōnen'' manga, as any reader of ''Manga/{{Patalliro}}'' or ''Manga/{{Sabagebu}}'' can tell you.

Aesthetically, ''Shōjo'' is typically drawn with lighter outlines than ''{{Shonen}}'' {{manga}}, and with sparser backgrounds and little (if any) shading -- but, [[Literature/ThroughTheLookingGlass contrariwise]], it frequently uses screentone patterns to set the emotional tone of a scene, and frames are rarely solely rectangular and borders are often absent. Character designs with eyes that are even larger than those usually used in {{manga}} and {{anime}} (the infamous dinner plate size) are also usually a giveaway that the work in question is ''Shōjo'' -- [[AnimationAnatomyAging especially when the characters are not children]]. Thanks to the PeripheryDemographic of girls reading ''Shōnen'' manga, however, the bolder lines and smaller eyes common to works of that demographic can find their way back into ''Shōjo'' to draw a wider appeal.

to:

Not all romance series are ''Shōjo''. ''{{Shonen}}'' romances take the boy's perspective ({{Magical Girlfriend}}s and HaremSeries are both common), and focus on the boy pursuing the girl, or trying to resolve the LoveDodecahedron. If it doesn't have that, a ''Shōnen'' romance tends to ''end'' with a declaration of love and its acceptance. ''Shōjo'' romances, by contrast, frequently involve the [[SmittenTeenageGirl heroine finding love early]] in the series, then stick around to watch the couple work through trouble in their relationship. Shoujo romances with male leads often tread somewhere in between: sometimes it takes the ''Shōnen'' route of the chase, others focus on how the boy treats his newfound lover.

Conversely, not all ''Shōjo'' series are romance either; some may just focus on dealing with everyday issues, others with uncovering mysteries, others where the action gets graphic or cerebral, and still others that like to take the [[SliceOfLife scenic route of life]]. And there's been times where ''Shōjo'' can get as bold-faced and crass as any ''Shōnen'' manga, as any reader of ''Manga/{{Patalliro}}'' or ''Manga/{{Sabagebu}}'' can tell you.

Aesthetically, ''Shōjo'' is typically drawn with lighter outlines than ''{{Shonen}}'' {{manga}}, and with sparser backgrounds and little (if any) shading -- but, [[Literature/ThroughTheLookingGlass contrariwise]], it frequently uses screentone patterns to set the emotional tone of a scene, and frames are rarely solely rectangular and borders are often absent. Character designs with eyes that are even larger than those usually used in {{manga}} and {{anime}} (the infamous dinner plate size) are also usually a giveaway that the work in question is ''Shōjo'' -- [[AnimationAnatomyAging especially when the characters are not children]]. Thanks Though even that rule may not be ironclad: thanks to the PeripheryDemographic of girls reading ''Shōnen'' manga, however, the bolder lines and smaller eyes common to works of that demographic can find their way back into ''Shōjo'' to draw a wider appeal.


Aesthetically, ''Shōjo'' is typically drawn with lighter outlines than ''{{shonen}}'' {{manga}}, and with sparser backgrounds and little (if any) shading -- but, [[Literature/ThroughTheLookingGlass contrariwise]], it frequently uses screentone patterns to set the emotional tone of a scene, and frames are rarely solely rectangular and borders are often absent. Character designs with eyes that are even larger than those usually used in {{manga}} and {{anime}} (the infamous dinner plate size) are also usually a giveaway that the work in question is ''Shōjo'' -- [[AnimationAnatomyAging especially when the characters are not children]]. Thanks to the PeripheryDemographic of girls reading ''shonen'' manga, however, the bolder lines and smaller eyes common to works of that demographic can find their way back into ''Shōjo'' to draw a wider appeal.

to:

Aesthetically, ''Shōjo'' is typically drawn with lighter outlines than ''{{shonen}}'' ''{{Shonen}}'' {{manga}}, and with sparser backgrounds and little (if any) shading -- but, [[Literature/ThroughTheLookingGlass contrariwise]], it frequently uses screentone patterns to set the emotional tone of a scene, and frames are rarely solely rectangular and borders are often absent. Character designs with eyes that are even larger than those usually used in {{manga}} and {{anime}} (the infamous dinner plate size) are also usually a giveaway that the work in question is ''Shōjo'' -- [[AnimationAnatomyAging especially when the characters are not children]]. Thanks to the PeripheryDemographic of girls reading ''shonen'' ''Shōnen'' manga, however, the bolder lines and smaller eyes common to works of that demographic can find their way back into ''Shōjo'' to draw a wider appeal.

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