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* ''Film/AirplaneIITheSequel'', which ''wasn't'' produced by James Abrahams and the Zucker brothers who did the brilliant ''Film/{{Airplane}}''. Most of its jokes and plot were re-hashed from the original movie, Leslie Nielsen didn't return, and it did so badly at the box office that the planned second sequel was canceled. The best parts were the courtroom scene and the [[AdamWesting self-parodying performance]] by Creator/WilliamShatner.

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* ''Film/AirplaneIITheSequel'', which ''wasn't'' produced by James Abrahams and the Zucker brothers who did the brilliant ''Film/{{Airplane}}''. Most of its jokes and plot were re-hashed from the original movie, Leslie Nielsen Creator/LeslieNielsen didn't return, and it did so badly at the box office that the planned second sequel was canceled. The best parts were the courtroom scene and the [[AdamWesting self-parodying performance]] by Creator/WilliamShatner.



* The ''Film/AustinPowers'' series, once it became insanely popular (i.e. by [[Film/AustinPowersTheSpyWhoShaggedMe the first sequel]]), started becoming a caricature of [[Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery the first movie]], with its VulgarHumor and especially their tendency to take gags that were most memorable from the previous movie and exaggerating them in the next. The first was intended to be an AffectionateParody of the movies Mike Myers used to watch with his father. After the first became a cultural phenomenon on home video, more writers were brought in to create something DenserAndWackier. By the time [[Film/AustinPowersInGoldmember the third movie]] came around, the series was repeatedly breaking the FourthWall and just generally making a mockery of itself. Still, some fans regret that the token CharacterDevelopment Austin went through in the first movie [[AesopAmnesia had to be systematically scrapped]] for the sequels to work.

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* The ''Film/AustinPowers'' series, once it became insanely popular (i.e. by [[Film/AustinPowersTheSpyWhoShaggedMe the first sequel]]), started becoming a caricature of [[Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery the first movie]], with its VulgarHumor and especially their tendency to take gags that were most memorable from the previous movie and exaggerating them in the next. The first was intended to be an AffectionateParody of the movies Mike Myers Creator/MikeMyers used to watch with his father. After the first became a cultural phenomenon on home video, more writers were brought in to create something DenserAndWackier. By the time [[Film/AustinPowersInGoldmember the third movie]] came around, the series was repeatedly breaking the FourthWall and just generally making a mockery of itself. Still, some fans regret that the token CharacterDevelopment Austin went through in the first movie [[AesopAmnesia had to be systematically scrapped]] for the sequels to work.



* ''Film/{{Friday}}'' was a great comedy with good performances from Ice Cube as Craig and Chris Tucker as Smokey, the latter of whom is widely thought to be the funniest part of the film. A sequel, ''Next Friday'', was released in 2000 and is generally considered inferior - mainly due to the lack of Smokey (Tucker had chosen to do ''Film/RushHour'' instead and had become a born-again Christian after making ''Money Talks''), who was replaced by Mike Epps as Day-Day - but the movie still has its defenders. 2002's ''Friday After Next'', however, has been almost universally panned.

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* ''Film/{{Friday}}'' was a great comedy with good performances from Ice Cube Music/IceCube as Craig and Chris Tucker Creator/ChrisTucker as Smokey, the latter of whom is widely thought to be the funniest part of the film. A sequel, ''Next Friday'', was released in 2000 and is generally considered inferior - mainly due to the lack of Smokey (Tucker had chosen to do ''Film/RushHour'' instead and had become a born-again Christian after making ''Money Talks''), who was replaced by Mike Epps as Day-Day - but the movie still has its defenders. 2002's ''Friday After Next'', however, has been almost universally panned.



* ''Film/{{Grease}}'' is a hugely popular [[TheFifties 50s nostalgia]] musical funfest. ''Film/{{Grease 2}}'' has only a few characters returning from the original (Frenchie, Eugene, the principal and her assistant, and the coach. All brief roles.) and introduces Sandy's cousin Michael in some weak attempt to connect the two movies. The plot is a GenderFlip of the first movie's plot and the results are... well, [[FanonDiscontinuity most Grease fans like to pretend it doesn't exist]]. Incidentally, ''Grease 2'' unwittingly stopped the franchise from experiencing what would likely be more sequelitis. There were plans for two more movies and a TV series, but they were scrapped after ''Grease 2'' flopped.

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* ''Film/{{Grease}}'' is a hugely popular [[TheFifties 50s nostalgia]] musical funfest. ''Film/{{Grease 2}}'' ''Film/Grease2'' has only a few characters returning from the original (Frenchie, Eugene, the principal and her assistant, and the coach. All brief roles.) and introduces Sandy's cousin Michael in some weak attempt to connect the two movies. The plot is a GenderFlip of the first movie's plot and the results are... well, [[FanonDiscontinuity most Grease fans like to pretend it doesn't exist]]. Incidentally, ''Grease 2'' unwittingly stopped the franchise from experiencing what would likely be more sequelitis. There were plans for two more movies and a TV series, but they were scrapped after ''Grease 2'' flopped.



* ''Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight'' had two sequels, 1970's ''They Call Me Mr. Tibbs'' and 1971's ''The Organization'', that most people tend to forget about. It doesn't help that the only people who worked on all three films -- other than Sidney Poitier, who played Tibbs in both sequels -- were Quincy Jones, who provided the jazzy score for each, and producer Walter Mirisch.

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* ''Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight'' had two sequels, 1970's ''They Call Me Mr. Tibbs'' and 1971's ''The Organization'', that most people tend to forget about. It doesn't help that the only people who worked on all three films -- other than Sidney Poitier, Creator/SidneyPoitier, who played Tibbs in both sequels -- were Quincy Jones, Music/QuincyJones, who provided the jazzy score for each, and producer Walter Mirisch.



* ''Film/{{Jaws 2}}'', ''Film/Jaws3D'', ''Film/JawsTheRevenge'', ad nauseam. Ken Begg's series of reviews chronicles the slide in quality from ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws.htm Jaws]]'' to ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws2.htm Jaws 2]]'' (which he admits is merely inferior and mediocre, but much better than the knock-offs and the next sequels) to ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws3-D.htm Jaws 3-D]]'' to ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws4.htm Jaws: The Revenge]]'' (which bottomed out at 0% on RT, including a zero star rating from Creator/RogerEbert, and ensnared the careers of a good chunk of its crew). So much that it was mocked in ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'': a holographic ''Jaws 19'' poster can be seen during the 2015 sequence. Which makes oddly prescient [[http://www.peterbenchley.com/articles/peter-benchley-the-father-jaws-and-other-tales-the-deep a move by Peter Benchley]], who wrote [[Literature/{{Jaws}} the original novel]]. Prior to the film's release, the royalties were late. He called his agent, she replied that there were negotiations on sequel right. “Sequel rights!? I don’t care about sequels; who’ll ever want to make a sequel to a movie about a fish? Sell them the rights to anything they want ... my life as an astronaut, ''any''thing. I need money!” Eventually Benchley's sequel rights were exchanged for one-time payments for each new installment, making the original author someone not to blame for the decay. Parodied again around "Back To The Future Day" in October 2015, when, to celebrate the gag from ''II'', Universal released a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pl092whRLlI fake trailer]] for the aforementioned ''Jaws 19''.

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* ''Film/{{Jaws 2}}'', ''Film/Jaws2'', ''Film/Jaws3D'', ''Film/JawsTheRevenge'', ad nauseam. Ken Begg's series of reviews chronicles the slide in quality from ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws.htm Jaws]]'' to ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws2.htm Jaws 2]]'' (which he admits is merely inferior and mediocre, but much better than the knock-offs and the next sequels) to ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws3-D.htm Jaws 3-D]]'' to ''[[http://www.jabootu.com/jaws4.htm Jaws: The Revenge]]'' (which bottomed out at 0% on RT, including a zero star rating from Creator/RogerEbert, and ensnared the careers of a good chunk of its crew). So much that it was mocked in ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartII'': a holographic ''Jaws 19'' poster can be seen during the 2015 sequence. Which makes oddly prescient [[http://www.peterbenchley.com/articles/peter-benchley-the-father-jaws-and-other-tales-the-deep a move by Peter Benchley]], who wrote [[Literature/{{Jaws}} the original novel]]. Prior to the film's release, the royalties were late. He called his agent, she replied that there were negotiations on sequel right. “Sequel rights!? I don’t care about sequels; who’ll ever want to make a sequel to a movie about a fish? Sell them the rights to anything they want ... my life as an astronaut, ''any''thing. I need money!” Eventually Benchley's sequel rights were exchanged for one-time payments for each new installment, making the original author someone not to blame for the decay. Parodied again around "Back To The Future Day" in October 2015, when, to celebrate the gag from ''II'', Universal released a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pl092whRLlI fake trailer]] for the aforementioned ''Jaws 19''.



* ''Film/TheMummyTombOfTheDragonEmperor'' is widely considered to be inferior to the first ''Film/{{The Mummy|1999}}'' (a very fun ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' style romp) and ''Film/TheMummyReturns'' (the first film on steroids) films. Probably not helped by the seven year gap between the second and third films - it badly misses Creator/RachelWeisz, who was replaced by Maria Bello (Weisz's and Fraser's chemistry in the first two films is obvious whereas Fraser and Bello are totally unconvincing as a couple). The omission of Imhotep (Creator/ArnoldVosloo) and Ardeth Bay (Creator/OdedFehr) robs the film of those actors' abilities to stretch beyond the schlock setting and craft believable and human characters. Creator/JetLi is criminally underused in the Dragon Emperor role, spending most of his screen time as a CGI dragon. Creator/MichelleYeoh is wasted in her role also and the sequence with the yetis stretches willing suspension of disbelief too far. Critically panned with poor fan reactions, it made LESS money than either of the first two despite seven years worth of inflation, and has probably [[FranchiseKiller killed the main franchise]] (though the ''Film/TheScorpionKing'' spinoff series continues).

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* ''Film/TheMummyTombOfTheDragonEmperor'' is widely considered to be inferior to the first ''Film/{{The Mummy|1999}}'' (a very fun ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' style romp) and ''Film/TheMummyReturns'' (the first film on steroids) films. Probably not helped by the seven year gap between the second and third films - it badly misses Creator/RachelWeisz, who was replaced by Maria Bello Creator/MariaBello (Weisz's and Fraser's chemistry in the first two films is obvious whereas Fraser and Bello are totally unconvincing as a couple). The omission of Imhotep (Creator/ArnoldVosloo) and Ardeth Bay (Creator/OdedFehr) robs the film of those actors' abilities to stretch beyond the schlock setting and craft believable and human characters. Creator/JetLi is criminally underused in the Dragon Emperor role, spending most of his screen time as a CGI dragon. Creator/MichelleYeoh is wasted in her role also and the sequence with the yetis stretches willing suspension of disbelief too far. Critically panned with poor fan reactions, it made LESS money than either of the first two despite seven years worth of inflation, and has probably [[FranchiseKiller killed the main franchise]] (though the ''Film/TheScorpionKing'' spinoff series continues).



* ''Film/OhGod'' is generally remembered as a quirky little Carl Reiner comedy, while the next two movies are ignored almost to the point of being FanonDiscontinuity. The changes in creators definitely didn't help.

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* ''Film/OhGod'' is generally remembered as a quirky little Carl Reiner Creator/CarlReiner comedy, while the next two movies are ignored almost to the point of being FanonDiscontinuity. The changes in creators definitely didn't help.



* While not considered terrible ''Film/PacificRimUprising'' is considered a major downgrade on [[Film/PacificRim the original]], lacking Del Toro's artistic vision, having disliked {{retcon}}s, much less likeable or memorable characters, and being far more MerchandiseDriven. Rather tellingly, following this film, nearly all online hype regarding followups to the franchise (which was very prevalent beforehand) vanished almost overnight.

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* While not considered terrible ''Film/PacificRimUprising'' is considered a major downgrade on [[Film/PacificRim the original]], lacking Del Toro's Creator/GuillermoDelToro's artistic vision, having disliked {{retcon}}s, much less likeable or memorable characters, and being far more MerchandiseDriven. Rather tellingly, following this film, nearly all online hype regarding followups to the franchise (which was very prevalent beforehand) vanished almost overnight.



* The ''Film/PoliceAcademy'' series. The first movie was a commercial success, and jumpstarted the careers of several actors who would go on to bigger projects (Steve Guttenberg, Kim Cattrall, Bobcat Goldthwait), but as the sequels progressed, the humor became increasingly lowbrow and cast members started leaving throughout the franchise. By the time the seventh and final film, ''Mission to Moscow'', was released in 1994, only a handful of original characters remained, and it failed to surpass the $200,000 mark. It's the last theatrical film directed by Alan Metter, who disowned it in the end.

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* The ''Film/PoliceAcademy'' series. The first movie was a commercial success, and jumpstarted the careers of several actors who would go on to bigger projects (Steve Guttenberg, Kim Cattrall, Bobcat Goldthwait), (Creator/SteveGuttenberg, Creator/KimCattrall, Creator/BobcatGoldthwait), but as the sequels progressed, the humor became increasingly lowbrow and cast members started leaving throughout the franchise. By the time the seventh and final film, ''Mission to Moscow'', was released in 1994, only a handful of original characters remained, and it failed to surpass the $200,000 mark. It's the last theatrical film directed by Alan Metter, who disowned it in the end.



* ''Film/TheToxicAvenger'' is a horror comedy classic. The second film isn’t ''bad'', but it’s largely just made up of footage that was cut from the first one, and it shows. The third film was panned and subjects Toxie to severe BadassDecay. This being the sort of series it is, the fourth film hangs a hilarious LampshadeHanging on it During the opening narration:

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* ''Film/TheToxicAvenger'' is a horror comedy classic. The second film isn’t isn't ''bad'', but it’s largely just made up of footage that was cut from the first one, and it shows. The third film was panned and subjects Toxie to severe BadassDecay. This being the sort of series it is, the fourth film hangs a hilarious LampshadeHanging on it During the opening narration:



* ''Film/WaynesWorld 2'' was deemed a step down and not as fresh as the first, though with still positive reviews and a fair share of fans - though not the same box office success, as [[Film/MrsDoubtfire steep]] [[Film/SchindlersList competition]] made it only gross $48 million domestically against a $40 million budget.

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* ''Film/WaynesWorld 2'' ''Film/WaynesWorld2'' was deemed a step down and not as fresh as the first, though with still positive reviews and a fair share of fans - though not the same box office success, as [[Film/MrsDoubtfire steep]] [[Film/SchindlersList competition]] made it only gross $48 million domestically against a $40 million budget.

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* ''Film/NuttyProfessorIITheKlumps'' raised the low-brow comedy of [[Film/TheNuttyProfessor1996 its predecessor]] to unsavory levels and the results wound up very inferior and often disgusting - an enhanced role for the other Klumps already meant {{Toilet|Humor}} ([[{{Gasshole}} the father]]) and VulgarHumor ([[DirtyOldWoman the grandmother]]), but things like [[BlackComedyRape rape by giant hamster]] were uncalled for.


* ''VideoGame/BattlefieldV''. Over time, many fans came to view the ''[=BFV=]'' entry as weakest installment in the mainline ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' games (1942, 2142, Vietnam and the 5 numbered titles) with much criticism aimed at its botched launch and weak post-launch support. Upon release in November 2018, the game had game-breaking bugs, deviated from the realistic aesthetics of previous games, didn't have iconic battles and lacked advertised features like the much-touted battle royale mode. While past ''Battlefield'' games improved with updates, ''[=BFV=]'' was riddled with problems throughout its lifecycle and whatever updates it received took too long to implement[[note]]Most glaringly, tank customization was advertised before release yet didn't appear in the base game until February 2020, more than ''15 months'' after launch.[[/note]]. The game couldn't even support double XP events or having more than 4 game modes at a time even though these features have been in every prior ''Battlefield'' games. Many fans have compared the game unfavorably to its predecessor ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' as that game was released in a solid state and improved over time whereas ''Battlefield V'' lingered in mediocrity for its entire lifespan. It's widely accepted as a very missed opportunity as Dice & EA took what was a highly anticipated game that was going back to its World War 2 roots, and instead created a buggy, controversial mess.

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* ''VideoGame/BattlefieldV''. Over time, many fans came to view the ''[=BFV=]'' entry as weakest installment in the mainline ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' games (1942, 2142, Vietnam and the 5 numbered titles) with much criticism aimed at its botched launch and weak post-launch support. Upon release in November 2018, the game had game-breaking bugs, deviated from the realistic aesthetics look of previous games, didn't have iconic battles and lacked advertised features like the much-touted battle royale mode. While past ''Battlefield'' games improved with updates, ''[=BFV=]'' was riddled with problems throughout its lifecycle and whatever updates it received took too long to implement[[note]]Most glaringly, tank customization was advertised before release yet didn't appear in the base game until February 2020, more than ''15 months'' after launch.[[/note]]. The game couldn't even support double XP events or having more than 4 game modes at a time even though these features have been in every prior ''Battlefield'' games. Many fans have compared the game unfavorably to its predecessor ''VideoGame/Battlefield1'' as that game was released in a solid state and improved over time whereas ''Battlefield V'' lingered in mediocrity for its entire lifespan. It's widely accepted as a very missed opportunity as Dice DICE & EA took what was a highly anticipated game that was going back to its World War 2 roots, and instead created a buggy, controversial mess.

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* Creator/JohnOsborne's ''Film/LookBackInAnger'' was a groundbreaking work that revitalised British theatre and gave a voice to the working class. Nearly thirty years later, Osborne wrote a sequel ''Déjàvu'' that sees the protagonist Jimmy Porter in middle-age. It closed after just seven weeks and was harshly reviewed, with critics calling it a series of monologues in place of a play. It would ultimately be the last play Osborne ever wrote.


* ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' is a well-regarded yearlong series that took place after ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'', while its follow-up ''ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis'' isn't due to it being responsible for the controversial FaceHeelTurn of Mary Marvel and other wide-sweeping character changes. This is not helped by the fact that Creator/DanDiDio once said that ''Countdown'' was ''52'' done right before it hit the shelves and due to its {{Padding}} structure.



* ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' is a well-regarded yearlong series that took place after ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'', while its follow-up ''ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis'' isn't due to it being responsible for the controversial FaceHeelTurn of Mary Marvel and other wide-sweeping character changes. This is not helped by the fact that Creator/DanDiDio once said that ''Countdown'' was ''52'' done right before it hit the shelves and due to its {{Padding}} structure.


* Parodied in ''Comicbook/TheSimpsons'' comic book storyline "When Bongos Collide!", in which [[EveryoneIsASuper everyone in Springfield gets superpowers]] as a [[ILoveNuclearPower result of a nuclear explosion]]. Troy [=McClure=]'s alter-ego, The Sequelizer, has the power to "create an infinite number of copies of [himself] -- although [[CloneDegeneration each is only 50% as powerful as the one before]]."
* Several fans think of [=Pk2=] as this for the excellent ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures''. Many more consider [[ContinuityReboot "Pikappa"]] a definite case.
* ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' suffered from this. He did fine when he started out as an occasional guest star in Franchise/SpiderMan's comics and did okay when he debuted in his own limited series, and then ongoing series. Unfortunately, when he became more popular and Marvel started to star him in ''Punisher War Journal'' and ''Punisher War Zone'', fans started to see what a one-dimensional character he was. In 1995, all three of his comics were canceled due to poor sales; he did gain some popularity back in 2000 as part of the Marvel Knights line.
* ''Comicbook/AvengersUndercover'' was considered vastly inferior to both its immediate predecessors, ''Comicbook/AvengersAcademy'' and ''Comicbook/AvengersArena'', and sales were so bad it was canceled at ten issues out of an intended twelve. For reference, cancellation of a book that has a set number of issues from the get-go is extremely rare. ''Avengers Arena'' itself was a ContestedSequel at best, with very few fans of ''Academy'' or ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'' walking away satisfied. ''Undercover'', it seems, burned through what little goodwill ''Arena'' had remaining.



* ''ComicBook/SecretWars1984'' was, and is, widely regarded as ''the'' classic Marvel CrisisCrossover, and one that's [[UnbuiltTrope held up very well since.]] ''ComicBook/SecretWarsII'', on the other hand, usually gets the response of "There was a second one?" Of course, it's hard to blame one for forgetting; a sequel to one of the most action-packed books in Marvel's history where a lengthy scene is devoted to the main villain learning how to use the bathroom was never going to go down well, and the considerably worse writing (better suited to a Creator/JimCarrey comedy than a superhero event book) did it no favors. The biggest weakness was that it tried to make the story about the Beyonder, whom most readers didn't find very interesting the first time around, and assumed that readers cared about seeing his story resolved when they mostly saw him as a plot device.
* ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsCollide'' is beloved by readers of both ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogArchieComics'' and ''ComicBook/MegaMan'' for the unique way everything happened and giving both video game stars a chance to meet long before ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' could. Its sequel, ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsUnite'' isn't as beloved, due to [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters too many characters]] (seriously, not counting the main four of ''Sonic'', ''VideoGame/SonicBoom'', ''Mega Man'' and ''VideoGame/MegaManX'', there are ''twelve franchises'' represented here), wasting the Mega Man X characters, reducing Sonic Boom to just Sticks, and so on. It ended up causing the deaths of all the series involved.

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* ''ComicBook/SecretWars1984'' was, ''Comicbook/AvengersUndercover'' was considered vastly inferior to both its immediate predecessors, ''Comicbook/AvengersAcademy'' and is, widely regarded as ''the'' classic Marvel CrisisCrossover, ''Comicbook/AvengersArena'', and one that's [[UnbuiltTrope held up very well since.]] ''ComicBook/SecretWarsII'', on sales were so bad it was canceled at ten issues out of an intended twelve. For reference, cancellation of a book that has a set number of issues from the other hand, usually gets the response of "There get-go is extremely rare. ''Avengers Arena'' itself was a second one?" Of course, it's hard to blame one for forgetting; a sequel to one of the most action-packed books in Marvel's history where a lengthy scene is devoted to the main villain learning how to use the bathroom was never going to go down well, and the considerably worse writing (better suited to a Creator/JimCarrey comedy than a superhero event book) did it no favors. The biggest weakness was that it tried to make the story about the Beyonder, whom most readers didn't find ContestedSequel at best, with very interesting the first time around, and assumed that readers cared about seeing his story resolved when they mostly saw him as a plot device.
* ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsCollide'' is beloved by readers
few fans of both ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogArchieComics'' and ''ComicBook/MegaMan'' for the unique way everything happened and giving both video game stars a chance to meet long before ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' could. Its sequel, ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsUnite'' isn't as beloved, due to [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters too many characters]] (seriously, not counting the main four of ''Sonic'', ''VideoGame/SonicBoom'', ''Mega Man'' and ''VideoGame/MegaManX'', there are ''twelve franchises'' represented here), wasting the Mega Man X characters, reducing Sonic Boom to just Sticks, and so on. It ended up causing the deaths of all the series involved.''Academy'' or ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'' walking away satisfied. ''Undercover'', it seems, burned through what little goodwill ''Arena'' had remaining.


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* ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' is a controversial event thanks to some CharacterDerailment and some ''very'' inconsistent political strawmanning, but it's somewhat VindicatedByHistory because it gave the Marvel Universe ''itself'' something of a story arc, with ''Civil War'' kicking off a saga that led into the darker ''Secret Invasion'' and ''Dark Reign'', followed by a triumphant return in ''Siege'' and ''The Heroic Age''. That and it didn't actually derail many books for long, and some of the tie-ins and consequences from the run are very well-liked, such as the death of Captain America. ''ComicBook/CivilWarII'', on the other hand... it's ''never'' talked about fondly. It features an insane amount of derailment, made everyone unlikeable, was setup for ''more'' inn-received stories such as Riri Williams' turn as Iron Man, Amadeus Cho's turn as the Hulk and ''ComicBook/InhumansVsXMen'', and was so bad that it's considered directly responsible for a ''huge'' DorkAge that took two years to end.


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* Several fans think of [=Pk2=] as this for the excellent ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures''. Many more consider [[ContinuityReboot "Pikappa"]] a definite case.
* ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' suffered from this. He did fine when he started out as an occasional guest star in Franchise/SpiderMan's comics and did okay when he debuted in his own limited series, and then ongoing series. Unfortunately, when he became more popular and Marvel started to star him in ''Punisher War Journal'' and ''Punisher War Zone'', fans started to see what a one-dimensional character he was. In 1995, all three of his comics were canceled due to poor sales; he did gain some popularity back in 2000 as part of the Marvel Knights line, and then ''much'' more popularity from the MAX line.
* ''ComicBook/SecretWars1984'' was, and is, widely regarded as ''the'' classic Marvel CrisisCrossover, and one that's [[UnbuiltTrope held up very well since.]] ''ComicBook/SecretWarsII'', on the other hand, usually gets the response of "There was a second one?" Of course, it's hard to blame one for forgetting; a sequel to one of the most action-packed books in Marvel's history where a lengthy scene is devoted to the main villain learning how to use the bathroom was never going to go down well, and the considerably worse writing (better suited to a Creator/JimCarrey comedy than a superhero event book) did it no favors. The biggest weakness was that it tried to make the story about the Beyonder, whom most readers didn't find very interesting the first time around, and assumed that readers cared about seeing his story resolved when they mostly saw him as a plot device.
* Parodied in ''Comicbook/TheSimpsons'' comic book storyline "When Bongos Collide!", in which [[EveryoneIsASuper everyone in Springfield gets superpowers]] as a [[ILoveNuclearPower result of a nuclear explosion]]. Troy [=McClure=]'s alter-ego, The Sequelizer, has the power to "create an infinite number of copies of [himself] -- although [[CloneDegeneration each is only 50% as powerful as the one before]]."
* ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsCollide'' is beloved by readers of both ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogArchieComics'' and ''ComicBook/MegaMan'' for the unique way everything happened and giving both video game stars a chance to meet long before ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' could. Its sequel, ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogMegaManWorldsUnite'' isn't as beloved, due to [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters too many characters]] (seriously, not counting the main four of ''Sonic'', ''VideoGame/SonicBoom'', ''Mega Man'' and ''VideoGame/MegaManX'', there are ''twelve franchises'' represented here), wasting the Mega Man X characters, reducing Sonic Boom to just Sticks, and so on. It ended up causing the deaths of all the series involved.


* ''Film/TheRing'' franchise has suffered from this disease. While each of the three "original" films has been well-received (Japanese, American, and Korean, respectively), their sequels have met with various degrees of scorn and failure to the point that the very first sequel, a film adaptation of the novel's follow-up ''Spiral'', is considered so bad it's CanonDiscontinuity by the Japanese producers, who went on to make ''The Ring 2'' instead.

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* ''Film/TheRing'' franchise has suffered from this disease. While each of the three "original" films has been well-received (Japanese, American, and Korean, respectively), their sequels have met with various degrees of scorn and failure to the point that the very first sequel, a film adaptation of the novel's follow-up ''Spiral'', is considered so bad it's CanonDiscontinuity by the Japanese producers, who went on to make ''The Ring ''Ring 2'' instead.instead. (Alternatively, even though *that* was a big box office draw, it’s overall lack of originality and goofier aspects had the studio shifting gears by changing directors and going back to the source material by adapting one of author Koji Suzuki’s short stories into the prequel ''Ring 0: Birthday'', which is generally regarded as a solid entry, and being the swan song of the Japanese film series until the Sadako 3D movies released a decade later.)


* The ''Series/DoctorWho Literature/PastDoctorAdventures'' novel ''The Quantum Archangel''. A sequel to "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E5TheTimeMonster The Time Monster]]", which the author claimed was intentionally "the ultimate in {{fanwank}}", it's basically "The Time Monster" ONLY BIGGER! So the TOMTIT machine that affects space-time is replaced by a more advanced version called the TITAN Array that affects Calabi-Yau space (the "extra" dimensions in superstring theory). TOMTIT was secretly created by the Master to trap a Chronovore; TITAN is commandeered by the Master to wipe the Chronovores out and [[AGodAmI give himself their powers]]. The Third Doctor disrupts TOMTIT with an arrangement of forks and winebottles; the Sixth Doctor builds a ''much bigger'' version to disrupt TITAN. The Third Doctor and the Delgado Master go on a jaunt to Ancient Atlantis; the Sixth Doctor and the Ainley Master visit a forgotten planet from the beginning of the universe. Stuart Hyde gets temporarily youthed instead of aged, the Doctor attempts to Time Ram the Master's TARDIS, and Kronos again {{Deus Ex Machina}}s everything at the end. Even the throwaway gag that "E = MC cubed" in the Vortex gets reused and amped up; in Calabi-Yau Space, apparently, E = MC to the fourth power. It's so blatant about it that some feel it goes beyond conventional sequelitis and becomes good, or at least successfully does what it wants to do.

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* The ''Series/DoctorWho Literature/PastDoctorAdventures'' novel ''The Quantum Archangel''. A sequel to "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E5TheTimeMonster The Time Monster]]", which the author claimed was intentionally "the ultimate in {{fanwank}}", it's basically "The Time Monster" ONLY BIGGER! So the TOMTIT machine that affects space-time is replaced by a more advanced version called the TITAN Array that affects Calabi-Yau space (the "extra" dimensions in superstring theory). TOMTIT was secretly created by the Master to trap a Chronovore; TITAN is commandeered by the Master to wipe the Chronovores out and [[AGodAmI [[PowerCopying give himself their powers]]. The Third Doctor disrupts TOMTIT with an arrangement of forks and winebottles; the Sixth Doctor builds a ''much bigger'' version to disrupt TITAN. The Third Doctor and the Delgado Master go on a jaunt to Ancient Atlantis; the Sixth Doctor and the Ainley Master visit a forgotten planet from the beginning of the universe. Stuart Hyde gets temporarily youthed instead of aged, the Doctor attempts to Time Ram the Master's TARDIS, and Kronos again {{Deus Ex Machina}}s everything at the end. Even the throwaway gag that "E = MC cubed" in the Vortex gets reused and amped up; in Calabi-Yau Space, apparently, E = MC to the fourth power. It's so blatant about it that some feel it goes beyond conventional sequelitis and becomes good, or at least successfully does what it wants to do.


-->-- '''Joel''', ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUsPartII'' (referring to ''Film/TheLostWorldJurassicPark'') [[note]]which is ironic, given ''The Last of Us 2'''s [[BrokenBase own]] [[ContestedSequel reception]].[[/note]]

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-->-- '''Joel''', ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUsPartII'' (referring to ''Film/TheLostWorldJurassicPark'') [[note]]which is ironic, given ''The Last of Us 2'''s [[BrokenBase own]] [[ContestedSequel own reception]].[[/note]]


* The ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movies alternates between playing sequelitis straight and turning it on its head. Critical consensus has the first being nothing special, the [[Film/TransformersRevengeOfTheFallen second downright bad]], the [[Film/TransformersDarkOfTheMoon third]] [[ContestedSequel having no]] [[BrokenBase real consensus]], and [[Film/TransformersAgeOfExtinction the fourth]] somehow being both an improvement ''and'' the worst of the lot. The first movie was an okay sci-fi action-thriller that gave a semi-realistic tone to the franchise. The second movie lost that touch and became an over the top action movie with tons of [[RefugeInAudacity unneeded adult humor]] (such as the pot smoking mom, the [[UnfortunateImplications racist robots]] and mechanical testicles) and a generic plot. The third movie tried to please everyone and lowered the screen time for the robots (even though they are the title characters), made the first half almost a sort of parody (which led to the return of Sam's parents who by now are nothing more than TheArtifact) and the second half a sci-fi war movie that [[DroppedABridgeOnHim dropped bridges on many characters]]. Finally, the fourth movie acted as a soft reboot of the series by replacing the human cast and notably extending the length of the action sequences; which in turn made the film the longest film of the series (2 hours and 45 minutes). While this move gave the title characters a notably increased amount of screentime, the final result was also considered by many reviewers to be a monotonous and phoned-in regurgitation of the previous three films. And [[Film/TransformersTheLastKnight the fifth film]] looks to have finally driven off the public, to the point that it underperformed in ''[[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff China]]'', historically the franchise's biggest stronghold, and grossed less than the first film despite a decade of inflation and foreign market expansion. (it was so bad that ''Film/{{Bumblebee}}'', widely considered better than most, if not ''all'' the movies, underperformed at the box office given ''The Last Knight'' poisoned the well)

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* The ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movies alternates between playing sequelitis straight and turning it on its head. Critical consensus has the first being nothing special, the [[Film/TransformersRevengeOfTheFallen second downright bad]], the [[Film/TransformersDarkOfTheMoon third]] [[ContestedSequel having no]] [[BrokenBase real consensus]], and [[Film/TransformersAgeOfExtinction the fourth]] somehow being both an improvement ''and'' the worst of the lot. The first movie was an okay sci-fi action-thriller that gave a semi-realistic tone to the franchise. The second movie lost that touch and became an over the top action movie with tons of [[RefugeInAudacity unneeded adult humor]] (such as the pot smoking mom, the [[UnfortunateImplications racist robots]] and mechanical testicles) and a generic plot. The third movie tried to please everyone and lowered the screen time for the robots (even though they are the title characters), made the first half almost a sort of parody (which led to the return of Sam's parents who by now are nothing more than TheArtifact) and the second half a sci-fi war movie that [[DroppedABridgeOnHim dropped bridges on many characters]]. Finally, the fourth movie acted as a soft reboot of the series by replacing the human cast and notably extending the length of the action sequences; which in turn made the film the longest film of the series (2 hours and 45 minutes). While this move gave the title characters a notably increased amount of screentime, the final result was also considered by many reviewers to be a monotonous and phoned-in regurgitation of the previous three films. And [[Film/TransformersTheLastKnight the fifth film]] looks to have finally driven off the public, to the point that it underperformed in ''[[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff China]]'', historically the franchise's biggest stronghold, and grossed less than the first film despite a decade of inflation and foreign market expansion. (it was so bad that ''Film/{{Bumblebee}}'', widely considered better than most, if not ''all'' the movies, underperformed at the box office given ''The Last Knight'' poisoned the well)


* ''Film/{{Beethoven}}'' was a modest hit when it came out, but wasn't anything particularly special. However, the success of the film was enough to give Hollywood an excuse to turn it into a franchise, resulting in a film series that became more and more out of touch with the original with every installment. While ''Beethoven's 2nd'' stayed true to the original formula with its then-familiar cast and Beethoven still at his usual canine antics, ''Beethoven's 3rd'' saw Beethoven transferred to a new family headed by father Judge Reinhold replacing Charles Grodin, with increasingly uninspired villains and stories appearing in each installment. By the time of Beethoven's ''sixth'' film appearance, the series was rebooted and retooled and then the ''seventh'' installment, ''Beethoven's Christmas Adventure'', had Beethoven ''talking'', finally doing away with what little resemblance the sequels still bore to the original. There was also a short-lived ''animated series''[[note]]The only cast members from the movie to take part in it were Nicholle Tom voicing the family's teenage daughter Ryce. And Dean Jones, replacing Charles Grodin. Jones played the BigBad in the movie![[/note]] In 2014, it spawned an ''eighth'' installment, ''Beethoven's Treasure Tail''.

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* ''Film/{{Beethoven}}'' was a modest hit when it came out, but wasn't anything particularly special. However, the success of the film was enough to give Hollywood an excuse to turn it into a franchise, resulting in a film series that became more and more out of touch with the original with every installment. While ''Beethoven's 2nd'' stayed true to the original formula with its then-familiar cast and Beethoven still at his usual canine antics, ''Beethoven's 3rd'' saw Beethoven transferred to a new family headed by father Judge Reinhold replacing Charles Grodin, with increasingly uninspired villains and stories appearing in each installment. By the time of Beethoven's ''sixth'' film appearance, the series was rebooted and retooled and then the ''seventh'' installment, ''Beethoven's Christmas Adventure'', had Beethoven ''talking'', finally doing away with what little resemblance the sequels still bore to the original. There was also a short-lived ''animated series''[[note]]The only cast members from the movie to take part in it were Nicholle Tom voicing the family's teenage daughter Ryce. And Dean Jones, replacing Charles Grodin. Jones played the BigBad in the movie![[/note]] movie[[/note]]! In 2014, it spawned an ''eighth'' installment, ''Beethoven's Treasure Tail''.


* ''Film/{{Beethoven}}'' was a modest hit when it came out, but wasn't anything particularly special. However, the success of the film was enough to give Hollywood an excuse to turn it into a franchise, resulting in a film series that became more and more out of touch with the original with every installment. While ''Beethoven's 2nd'' stayed true to the original formula with its then-familiar cast and Beethoven still at his usual canine antics, ''Beethoven's 3rd'' saw Beethoven transferred to a new family headed by father Judge Reinhold replacing Charles Grodin, with increasingly uninspired villains and stories appearing in each installment. By the time of Beethoven's ''sixth'' film appearance, the series was rebooted and retooled and then the ''seventh'' installment, ''Beethoven's Christmas Adventure'', had Beethoven ''talking'', finally doing away with what little resemblance the sequels still bore to the original. There was also a short-lived ''animated series''. In 2014, it spawned an ''eighth'' installment, ''Beethoven's Treasure Tail''.

to:

* ''Film/{{Beethoven}}'' was a modest hit when it came out, but wasn't anything particularly special. However, the success of the film was enough to give Hollywood an excuse to turn it into a franchise, resulting in a film series that became more and more out of touch with the original with every installment. While ''Beethoven's 2nd'' stayed true to the original formula with its then-familiar cast and Beethoven still at his usual canine antics, ''Beethoven's 3rd'' saw Beethoven transferred to a new family headed by father Judge Reinhold replacing Charles Grodin, with increasingly uninspired villains and stories appearing in each installment. By the time of Beethoven's ''sixth'' film appearance, the series was rebooted and retooled and then the ''seventh'' installment, ''Beethoven's Christmas Adventure'', had Beethoven ''talking'', finally doing away with what little resemblance the sequels still bore to the original. There was also a short-lived ''animated series''. series''[[note]]The only cast members from the movie to take part in it were Nicholle Tom voicing the family's teenage daughter Ryce. And Dean Jones, replacing Charles Grodin. Jones played the BigBad in the movie![[/note]] In 2014, it spawned an ''eighth'' installment, ''Beethoven's Treasure Tail''.


* Many rides at Ride/DisneyThemeParks fall prey to this. Perhaps the most puissant example of this trope in a Disney ride is the "Imagination" rides featured at the EPCOT theme park in Disney World. The original ride, Ride/JourneyIntoImagination, was a much beloved and very creative ride centering around the world of a child's imagination and starred the Dreamfinder, a red-bearded eccentric who collected dreams and creative thoughts, and his pet purple dragon Figment with a {{Clock|Punk}} or SteamPunk style. ExecutiveMeddling involving a potential change in sponsors caused the ride to close in 1998 for a complete overhaul. It was reopened in 1999 as "Journey Into Your Imagination", a completely redone ride featuring none of the charm possessed by the original and with both Figment and the Dreamfinder MIA. The new ride set a record for the most complaints received over a new attraction at a Disney Park. The revamp was received so badly, it was closed a mere 2 years later in 2001. In 2002 the ride received a later update, "Journey Into Imagination With Figment". Though it is a notable improvement over the second version of the ride, most long time Disney parkgoers tend to agree that the ride's first incarnation was by far its best.

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* Many rides at Ride/DisneyThemeParks fall prey to this. Perhaps the most puissant example of this trope in a Disney ride is the "Imagination" rides featured at the EPCOT theme park in Disney World. The original ride, Ride/JourneyIntoImagination, was a much beloved and very creative ride centering around the world of a child's imagination and starred the Dreamfinder, a red-bearded eccentric who collected dreams and creative thoughts, and his pet purple dragon Figment with a {{Clock|Punk}} or SteamPunk style. ExecutiveMeddling involving a potential change in sponsors caused the ride to close in 1998 for a complete overhaul. It was reopened in 1999 as "Journey Into Your Imagination", a completely redone ride featuring none of the charm possessed by the original and original, with both Figment and the Dreamfinder MIA.MIA and Figment reduced to an extremely brief cameo. The new ride set a record for the most complaints received over a new attraction at a Disney Park. The revamp was received so badly, it was closed a mere 2 years later in 2001. In 2002 the ride received a later update, "Journey Into Imagination With Figment". Though it is a notable improvement over the second version of the ride, most long time Disney parkgoers tend to agree that the ride's first incarnation was by far its best.


-->-- '''Joel''', ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUsPartII'' (referring to ''Film/TheLostWorldJurassicPark'') [[note]]which is ironic given The Last of Us 2's own reception[[/note]]

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-->-- '''Joel''', ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUsPartII'' (referring to ''Film/TheLostWorldJurassicPark'') [[note]]which is ironic ironic, given The ''The Last of Us 2's own reception[[/note]]
2'''s [[BrokenBase own]] [[ContestedSequel reception]].[[/note]]


* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'': The [[Film/TheTerminator first]] was iconic. The [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay second]], possibly one of the [[EvenBetterSequel single greatest sequels of all time]]. The [[Film/Terminator3RiseOfTheMachines third]] was one hell of a ContestedSequel, and resulted in a [[Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles TV series]] being made on the principle that T3 [[AlternateContinuity never happened]]. The [[Film/TerminatorSalvation fourth]], while visually impressive, lacked substance and ended up being an underperformer at the box office, which then led to the [[CreatorKiller death of its production company]] and [[ChannelHop the rights being sold off]]. And when [[Film/TerminatorGenisys the fifth]] came out, again it wasn't as well received - particularly how it retcons the events of the first four movies with [[TimeyWimeyBall convoluted time travel]] - and led to the next film doing another reboot. ''Film/TerminatorDarkFate'' has got the best reviews since the third, but time will tell how well it will be remembered.

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* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'': The [[Film/TheTerminator first]] was iconic. The [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay second]], possibly one of the [[EvenBetterSequel single greatest sequels of all time]]. The [[Film/Terminator3RiseOfTheMachines third]] was one hell of a ContestedSequel, and resulted in a [[Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles TV series]] being made on the principle that T3 [[AlternateContinuity never happened]]. The [[Film/TerminatorSalvation fourth]], while visually impressive, lacked substance and ended up being an underperformer at the box office, which then led to the [[CreatorKiller death of its production company]] and [[ChannelHop the rights being sold off]]. And when [[Film/TerminatorGenisys the fifth]] came out, again it wasn't as well received - particularly how it retcons the events of the first four movies with [[TimeyWimeyBall convoluted time travel]] - and led to the next film doing another reboot. ''Film/TerminatorDarkFate'' [[SurprisinglyImprovedSequel has got the best reviews since the third, third]], but time will tell how well it will be remembered.



* ''Film/UniversalSoldier'' had a lot of it, first with two TV movies without anyone from the other movies, and then by actually bringing Van Damme back in ''Film/UniversalSoldierTheReturn'', but delivering a lame action movie with underwhelming effects and an IdiotPlot. Surprisingly, the direct-to-video sequel ''Film/UniversalSoldierRegeneration'' (which like ''The Return'' ignored the two TV movies, also removed ''The Return'' from canon), averted this, being considered the first worthy follow-up, only for ''Film/UniversalSoldierDayOfReckoning'' to be a more divisive affair.

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* ''Film/UniversalSoldier'' had a lot of it, first with two TV movies without anyone from the other movies, and then by actually bringing Van Damme back in ''Film/UniversalSoldierTheReturn'', but delivering a lame action movie with underwhelming effects and an IdiotPlot. Surprisingly, the direct-to-video sequel ''Film/UniversalSoldierRegeneration'' (which like ''The Return'' ignored the two TV movies, also removed ''The Return'' from canon), averted this, being considered [[SurprisinglyImprovedSequel the first worthy follow-up, follow-up]], only for ''Film/UniversalSoldierDayOfReckoning'' to be [[BrokenBase a more divisive affair.affair]].

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