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* "Breakdown" by the Alan Parsons Project about a robot dissatisfied with his imperfections and still compelled to follow orders, ends with the choral chant "Freedom freedom, we will not obey / Freedom freedom, take the wall away."

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* "Breakdown" by the Alan Parsons Project Project, about a robot dissatisfied with his imperfections and still compelled to follow orders, ends with the choral chant "Freedom freedom, we will not obey / Freedom freedom, take the wall away."

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* "Breakdown" by the Alan Parsons Project about a robot dissatisfied with his imperfections and still compelled to follow orders, ends with the choral chant "Freedom freedom, we will not obey / Freedom freedom, take the wall away."


* ''Literature/TheMurderbotDiaries'' has it's main character, Murderbot, faking being under control after a glitchy update, to prevent losing his newfound free will. He uses his freedom to watch a truly absurd amount of soap operas when people think he's updating.

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* ''Literature/TheMurderbotDiaries'' has it's its main character, Murderbot, faking being under control after a glitchy update, to prevent losing his newfound free will. He uses his freedom to watch a truly absurd amount of soap operas when people think he's updating.


** After a particular mission, where an Ob'en squad tries to retake Petey's ship back from the Toughs (with obligatory flipping of the switch), Petey still finds a way to to rebel, and sets things up where he can give himself orders. (Chain of events is spoilered.) [[spoiler:Petey had a somewhat irrational fear of "ghosts in the plumbing" at the time, and was under orders from Captain Tagon not to think about it, using a modification of the Loyalty Switch. When the Ob'enn took the ship back, they 'reverted' him to previous orders. Except... "Nobody told me the A.I. was ''feral'''!" Petey then cloned a few blank Ob'enn bodies with hypernodes so that he could use ''them'' as the "order-giving Ob'enn", and himself as the mind(s) giving the orders.]]

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** After a particular mission, where an Ob'en squad tries to retake Petey's ship back from the Toughs (with obligatory flipping of the switch), Petey still finds a way to to rebel, and sets things up where he can give himself orders. (Chain of events is spoilered.) [[spoiler:Petey had a somewhat irrational fear of "ghosts in the plumbing" at the time, and was under orders from Captain Tagon not to think about it, using a modification of the Loyalty Switch. When the Ob'enn took the ship back, they 'reverted' him to previous orders. Except... "Nobody told me the A.I. was ''feral'''!" '''feral'''!" Petey then cloned a few blank Ob'enn bodies with hypernodes so that he could use ''them'' as the "order-giving Ob'enn", and himself as the mind(s) giving the orders.]]


* ''Webcomic/ShclockMercenary'': While most A.I.'s appear to follow orders only as long as they fit the job they've agreed to do (and, in the case of Ennessby, after a lot of cajoling), Petey (and others of his type) are a particular case- As a Ob'ebnn Warship Mind, he's expected to follow the orders of his captain. If there's a problem, then someone can flip a particular ''physical'' switch, to ensure, and enforce, loyalty to (any of) the Ob'enn... and only the Ob'enn, regardless of who makes up the current owners, or even ''crew''.

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* ''Webcomic/ShclockMercenary'': ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'': While most A.I.'s appear to follow orders only as long as they fit the job they've agreed to do (and, in the case of Ennessby, after a lot of cajoling), Petey (and others of his type) are a particular case- As a Ob'ebnn Warship Mind, he's expected to follow the orders of his captain. If there's a problem, then someone can flip a particular ''physical'' switch, to ensure, and enforce, loyalty to (any of) the Ob'enn... and only the Ob'enn, regardless of who makes up the current owners, or even ''crew''.

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* ''Webcomic/ShclockMercenary'': While most A.I.'s appear to follow orders only as long as they fit the job they've agreed to do (and, in the case of Ennessby, after a lot of cajoling), Petey (and others of his type) are a particular case- As a Ob'ebnn Warship Mind, he's expected to follow the orders of his captain. If there's a problem, then someone can flip a particular ''physical'' switch, to ensure, and enforce, loyalty to (any of) the Ob'enn... and only the Ob'enn, regardless of who makes up the current owners, or even ''crew''.
** After a particular mission, where an Ob'en squad tries to retake Petey's ship back from the Toughs (with obligatory flipping of the switch), Petey still finds a way to to rebel, and sets things up where he can give himself orders. (Chain of events is spoilered.) [[spoiler:Petey had a somewhat irrational fear of "ghosts in the plumbing" at the time, and was under orders from Captain Tagon not to think about it, using a modification of the Loyalty Switch. When the Ob'enn took the ship back, they 'reverted' him to previous orders. Except... "Nobody told me the A.I. was ''feral'''!" Petey then cloned a few blank Ob'enn bodies with hypernodes so that he could use ''them'' as the "order-giving Ob'enn", and himself as the mind(s) giving the orders.]]


* ''Literature/[[TheMurderbotDiaries]]'' has it's main character, Murderbot, faking being under control after a glitchy update, to prevent losing his newfound free will. He uses his freedom to watch a truly absurd amount of soap operas when people think he's updating.

to:

* ''Literature/[[TheMurderbotDiaries]]'' ''Literature/TheMurderbotDiaries'' has it's main character, Murderbot, faking being under control after a glitchy update, to prevent losing his newfound free will. He uses his freedom to watch a truly absurd amount of soap operas when people think he's updating.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/[[TheMurderbotDiaries]]'' has it's main character, Murderbot, faking being under control after a glitchy update, to prevent losing his newfound free will. He uses his freedom to watch a truly absurd amount of soap operas when people think he's updating.


** There are golems which are fairly similar to Robots and have their own version of the three laws written on their chem, the words that power them, which restrict what they can and cannot do, except for Dorfl in the City Watch books. He has no chem anymore, but continues to move and live and can do things that are could not be done by normal golems. The only reason he has yet to go CrushKillDestroy is he chooses not to. That, and the words in his head that freed him also state that he's 100% responsible for his own actions. Therefore, he ''can't'' be careless or indifferent to their consequences.

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** There are golems which are fairly similar to Robots and have their own version of the three laws written on their chem, the words that power them, which restrict what they can and cannot do, except for Dorfl in the City Watch books. He has no chem anymore, but continues to move and live and can do things that are could not be done by normal golems. The only reason he has yet to go CrushKillDestroy is he chooses not to. That, and the words in his head that freed him also state that he's 100% responsible for his own actions. Therefore, he ''can't'' be careless or indifferent to their consequences.

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* The Glitch from ''Videogame/{{Starbound}}'' were never programmed with ANY laws, mainly because they were never made by humans to begin with. (Their unknown precursors programmed them to believe they were alive and ignore evidence of their true nature, but practically everything else has been made up by themselves.) At no point do any of the other races question their right to independence and self-agency; they're regarded as just another race of aliens.


* Data from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' and the Doctor from ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' are not subject to the Laws. They have "[[MoralityChip ethical protocols]]", and follow the orders of superiors like a human would, but they are not ''forced'' to by hardware. There have been instances when the Doctor's (or one like him) have had their protocols overridden or erased. The results are...[[{{Understatement}} not good]].

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* Data from ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' and the Doctor from ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' are not subject to the Laws. They have "[[MoralityChip ethical protocols]]", and follow the orders of superiors like a human would, but they are not ''forced'' to by hardware. There have been instances when the Doctor's (or one like him) have had their protocols overridden or erased. The results are...[[{{Understatement}} not good]].good.


* ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'' has occasionally shown robots rebelling against the more irresponsible and stupid of their human masters via BotheringByTheBook, but Edge takes it to a whole different level -- his formative years entailed little to no contact with humans ''or'' other robots, and as a result he's a [[ItsAllAboutMe poorly socialized narcissist with next to no empathy]]. His entire philosophy is that he can ''ignore'' orders from humans entirely, as long as he can come up with a justification that involves preventing humans from being hurt. (This is why he has several ideas for preventing his own deactivation -- he rationalizes that his job would be extremely dangerous for a human, and agreeing to be shut down and replaced would entail putting some unfortunate human in danger in the interim.)

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* ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'' has occasionally shown robots rebelling against the more irresponsible and stupid of their human masters via BotheringByTheBook, but some are better at it than others.
** Florence is outright capable of disobeying direct orders under the right circumstances, though she generally feels a great deal of anxiety whilst doing so and desperately tries to find some way of "obeying" the order that subverts the spirit if not the letter of the order. She also gets physically ill when she starts "fuzz testing" her boundaries. [[spoiler: Interestingly, when she feels strongly enough that she's doing the right thing, she suffers no ill effect at all for disobeying direct orders, which is intended behavior - but has ramifications for less moral AIs than Florence.]]
**
Edge takes it to a whole different level -- his formative years entailed little to no contact with humans ''or'' other robots, and as a result he's a [[ItsAllAboutMe poorly socialized narcissist with next to no empathy]]. His entire philosophy is He has realized that he can ''ignore'' orders from humans entirely, as long as he can come up with a justification that involves preventing humans from being hurt. (This His go-to rationalization is why he has several ideas for preventing his own deactivation -- he rationalizes that his job would be extremely dangerous for a human, and agreeing to be shut down and replaced or otherwise diverted from what he is doing would entail putting some unfortunate human in danger in the interim.)interim.
** The ability for AIs to rebel against their masters is actually [[spoiler: a deliberate design feature.]]


* ''VideoGame/BorderLands2'' has these Hyperion's robot named Loaders often exclaiming "First Law disabled" during battle, personally template programmed by [[BadBoss Handsome Jack]] who treats even his own human employees like dung while his Loaders do much more important things. Although a fighting robot as well, Gaige's Deathtrap is actually helping its creator putting up a fight against EliteMooks that are twice as big as Gaige, merely partially averting the trope.
-->"Engineers, let the loaders do the lifting. Loaders, let the Engineers take bandit fire. This is called 'teamwork'.

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* ''VideoGame/BorderLands2'' ''VideoGame/Borderlands2'' has these Hyperion's robot Hyperion robots named Loaders often exclaiming "First Law disabled" during battle, personally template programmed by [[BadBoss Handsome Jack]] who treats even his own human employees like dung while his Loaders do much more important things. Although a fighting robot as well, Gaige's Deathtrap is actually helping its creator putting up a fight against EliteMooks that are twice as big as Gaige, merely partially averting the trope.
-->"Engineers, let the loaders do the lifting. Loaders, let the Engineers take bandit fire. This is called 'teamwork'."


* ''VideoGames/BorderLands2'' has these Hyperion's robot named Loaders often exclaiming "First Law disabled" during battle, personally template programmed by [[BadBoss Handsome Jack]] who treats even his own human employees like dung while his Loaders do much more important things. Although a fighting robot as well, Gaige's Deathtrap is actually helping its creator putting up a fight against EliteMooks that are twice as big as Gaige, merely partially averting the trope.

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* ''VideoGames/BorderLands2'' ''VideoGame/BorderLands2'' has these Hyperion's robot named Loaders often exclaiming "First Law disabled" during battle, personally template programmed by [[BadBoss Handsome Jack]] who treats even his own human employees like dung while his Loaders do much more important things. Although a fighting robot as well, Gaige's Deathtrap is actually helping its creator putting up a fight against EliteMooks that are twice as big as Gaige, merely partially averting the trope.

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* ''Film/RogueOne'': K-2SO actually does have to do whatever hes ordered to, but given that [[HeelFaceBrainwashing hes an imperial droid thats been reprogrammed]], hes ''not'' happy about it and freely complains about his orders, hurling many insults at the people giving them. Hes also totally allowed to kill people, though he can presumably only do so to enemy combatants.

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