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* Defied in the ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}''[=/=]''Franchise/SlyCooper'' crossover ''Of Heists and Hustles''. The Cooper gang makes sure the BigBad can't use his wealth to weasel his way out of criminal charges by hacking into his bank accounts, ransacking his mansion, and then ''blowing it up'' so he can't sell the property. And [[LaserGuidedKarma just after his insurance company dropped his coverage]], too.

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* Defied in the ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}''[=/=]''Franchise/SlyCooper'' ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}''[=/=]''VideoGame/SlyCooper'' crossover ''Of Heists and Hustles''. The Cooper gang makes sure the BigBad can't use his wealth to weasel his way out of criminal charges by hacking into his bank accounts, ransacking his mansion, and then ''blowing it up'' so he can't sell the property. And [[LaserGuidedKarma just after his insurance company dropped his coverage]], too.

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* This is basically the attitude of the rich family in the ''Series/NCISNewOrleans'' episode "A House Divided" when one of them -- a Navy lieutenant -- falls down the stairs to his death. The matriarch and her lawyer stonewall Pride's investigation and are implied to have bribed at least one official to help MakeItLookLikeAnAccident, even though Loretta has already found crucial evidence that the lieutenant was drugged, making this a homicide investigation. [[spoiler:It's then revealed that the family was involved in smuggling counterfeit money and the lieutenant wanted to do the right thing and shut them down, so his mother drugged him to slow him down -- and while he was drugged, he fell down the stairs, making her legally responsible for his death.]]


* Shinzen Tennozou, among several other ''Anime/SpeedGrapher'' characters.
** [[BigBad Suitengu]] actually lampshades this often in the series, as well as invoking the trope constantly. When he encounters the son of a debtor that he had just had murdered, Suitengu says "If you want my life, make money, then come and buy it."

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* Shinzen Tennozou, [[BigBad Shinzen]] [[EvilMatriarch Tennozou]], among several other ''Anime/SpeedGrapher'' characters.
** [[BigBad [[DragonInChief Chouji]] [[EnigmaticMinion Suitengu]] actually lampshades this often in the series, as well as invoking the trope constantly. When he encounters the son of a debtor that he had just had murdered, Suitengu says "If you want my life, make money, then come and buy it."

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* ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'': Played in various ways. While the mercenaries ''claim'' that they are OnlyInItForTheMoney, they often turn to ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules instead. Minor characters are often seen being bribed by villains, and Ceeta once tried this despite the fact that she was cut off from resupply.
-->'''Tagon:''' You're trying to bait me with money you don't even ''have''.\\
'''Ceeta:''' But you're hungry enough to fall for it, right?

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* {{Implied|Trope}} in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2''. A [[StoryBreadcrumbs Sunken Scroll]] reveals that all of the [[LimitBreak Specials]] from the first game were recalled due to safety concerns, leading to the creation of the new batch currently used in ink battles. However, [[spoiler: in the [[DownloadableContent Octo Expansion]], we find out that the [[Fiction500 comically-wealthy]] Pearl still has a [[BrownNote Killer Wail]], an old Special]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/WeBareBears'': In "Ranger Norm", [[spoiler: the Bears learn Tabes' replacement Norm is actually working with a developer to bulldoze part of the forest and build a golf course. When Norm checks with his boss over the phone to see if their construction is legal, his boss replies "Norm, we're rich. ''Everything'' is legal!" and the two share an EvilLaugh.]]


NOTE: In deference to the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, please restrict yourself to either (a) general classes of behavior or (b) specific instances only when either (1) the trope is well documented/undisputed or (2) all parties to the incident have all been dead for at least fifty years.

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NOTE: In deference to the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment, please restrict yourself to either (a) general classes of behavior or (b) specific instances only when either (1) the trope is well documented/undisputed or (2) all parties to the incident have all been dead for at least fifty years.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' basically has this built into its setting: The very first thing said about life in the Sixth World in the 5th edition rulebook is "Everything has a Price". If it exists, cash can be used to get it. InUniverse, part of the setting's {{dystopia}} came about thanks to a pair of Supreme Court decisions that created the concept of Corporate Extraterratoriality. To make a long story short: If your MegaCorp is big enough, you are your own nation. This has essentially dismantled the concept of the 20th century nation state, with the surviving governments being at best second-tier to moneyed interests that make Standard Oil look like some five-year-old kid's sidewalk lemonade stand.

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* In ''Film/SchindlersList'', Oskar Schindler is a rare heroic example: he bribes Nazi officials left and right in order to save his Jewish workers and their families from the death camps. Also, earlier in the film, he is shown obtaining luxury items for himself through the black market.


* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'':

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* ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'':''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'':

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* In ''[[Literature/MortalEngines Predator's Gold]]'', Tom gets annoyed at the Huntsmen of Arkangel when they offer cash rewards for tips on the locations of cities they can hunt, believing that their wealth interferes with the 'purity' of Municipal Darwinism.

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** Though this is a definite case of DependingOnTheWriter; other comics depict Batman as considering the Penguin such a valuable informant that he doesn't really bother investigating the Iceberg Lounge's illegal dealings ''too'' closely.


** And subverted [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome spectacularly]] on Yokoya, who previously was able to buy his way out of any situation with money. In the Pandemic Game, one of his teammates had turned sides and locked himself in a room, forcing Yokoya to persuade to come out by offering money. But after slipping cheque after cheque underneath the door, the teammate still wasn't satisfied and kept demanding more money, until Yokoya [[VillainousBreakdown lost his cool]] and began kicking the door in frustration. Then, we find out that [[spoiler:it was Akiyama in the room all along and Yokoya had been giving free money to his archrival this whole time!]]

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** And subverted [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome spectacularly]] on Yokoya, who previously was able to buy his way out of any situation with money. In the Pandemic Game, one of his teammates had turned sides and locked himself in a room, forcing Yokoya to persuade to come out by offering money. But after slipping cheque after cheque underneath the door, the teammate still wasn't satisfied and kept demanding more money, until Yokoya [[VillainousBreakdown lost his cool]] and began kicking the door in frustration. Then, we find out that [[spoiler:it was Akiyama in the room all along and Yokoya had been giving free money to his archrival this whole time!]]



** [[CrowningMomentofFunny Guess who has a date with a prostituuuute!]]

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** [[CrowningMomentofFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments Guess who has a date with a prostituuuute!]]


[[folder: Trope Namer ]]

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[[folder: Trope Namer ]][[folder:Trope Namer]]



[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]
* Manjoume/ [[DubNameChange Chazz Princeton]] of ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' indulged in this trope prior to his CharacterDevelopment, as this conversation from this English dub shows:

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[[folder: Anime [[folder:Anime and Manga ]]
Manga]]
* Manjoume/ [[DubNameChange Manjoume/[[DubNameChange Chazz Princeton]] of ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' indulged in this trope prior to his CharacterDevelopment, as this conversation from this English dub shows:



[[folder: Comic Books ]]

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[[folder: Comic Books ]][[folder:Comic Books]]



[[folder:Films -- Animation]]

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[[folder:Films -- Animation]] Animation]]
* Lampshaded at the end of ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'', when Violet comments that since [[spoiler:Evelyn]] is rich, [[spoiler:she'll]] most likely get a slap on the wrist as [[spoiler:she's]] pushed into the back of a police car.



* Lampshaded in the end of ''WesternAnimation/Incredibles2'' when Violet comments that since [[spoiler:Evelyn]] is rich [[spoiler:she'll]] most likely get a slap on the wrist as [[spoiler:she's]] pushed into the back of a police car.



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



[[folder: Live Action TV ]]
* ''Series/CopRock'': the upper class people arrested for using narcotics sing that they should be ignored since they pay high taxes. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cftN2nimH3s Cop Rock - Don't Mess With My Pursuit of Happiness]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Every House in the Westerlands, as virtually all the gold mines in Westeros are here, making these Houses obscenely rich, especially the Great House, House Lannister. This is implied to be a philosophy of Tywin Lannister's in particular, and also Tyrion Lannister's. Like father, like son. Tyrion's go-to solution in problematic situations is to attempt to buy his way out. However, his particular skill is offering money in a charismatic and audacious way, which allows him to win the loyalty of those he pays off. Even the lower Westerlands Houses can get in on this considering the Lannister fortunes have enriched almost every noble house of the region. However, it can and has backfired spectacularly when the target decides that they're insulted by the idea of being bought by some rich snot. Come Season 4 though, they're running on the ''idea'' that they're ''still'' rich...
* On ''Series/NewsRadio'', Jimmy James is a likable guy in some respects, but he frustrates Dave to no end because he can make up any rules and do anything he wants with his unlimited wallet. He secretly bought a newspaper and published a negative review in it just to motivate his staff; he plays around with the bonuses in one episode; and he's motivated more by a sadistic sense of fun rather than bottom line profit in terms of whether to give Matthew his job back.
* One of the first examples on TV was probably Thurston Howell, III on ''Series/GilligansIsland''. He kept trying to constantly bribe the rather gullible Gilligan into doing things for him. It doesn't work.
* ''Series/LawAndOrder'' often has these characters as defendants, as they usually hire the best lawyers; a RecurringCharacter named Arthur [[PunnyName Gold]] putting in an appearance is a dead giveaway. If anyone's likely to get away with murder on these shows, it's them.
** Gold seems to have been replaced as the go-to shyster by [[Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit SVU's]] Lionel Granger.
* Anyone with the last name Luthor on ''Series/{{Smallville}}''. [[spoiler:Which includes Tess Mercer.]]
** [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Oliver]], when not busy CrimefightingWithCash.
* Edward Vogler in Season 1 of ''Series/{{House}}'' starts running the hospital like an EvilOverlord, making calls about things like a dying cancer patient getting a C-Section, purely because he can threaten to withdraw a 100 million dollar donation if everybody doesn't say "How high?" whenever he says "Jump!"
** [[spoiler:Eventually subverted when he begins attempting to pick off board members who stand up to him; the rest of the board finally says, effectively, "Screw your money, we're going home."]]
** Much later in the series, a wealthy man ''demands'' that House be the one that treats his son (as it turns out, House [[spoiler:had his license revoked]], but they go along with this anyway. Eventually, when even House can't figure out how to save his son, the man acknowledges that he's been practicing this trope all his life and blames the fact that his wife is dead and his son dying on "[[LaserGuidedKarma the karma]]", and tries to reverse it by giving up his entire fortune. [[spoiler:The kid ''does'' get better...but the idiot still lost almost everything. WhatAnIdiot...]]
*** What makes it worse is that he was specifically told that dissolving his company would make hundreds of workers redundant...and he did it ''anyway'', which if anything would make karma even more pissed at him.
* Stephanie Forrester from ''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful''. She has gotten away with accomplice to rape, harbouring a fugitive and accomplice-after-the-fact to murder. Among other things.
* ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment''

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[[folder: Live Action TV ]]
[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/CopRock'': the upper class people arrested for using narcotics sing that they should be ignored since they pay high taxes. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cftN2nimH3s Cop Rock - Don't Mess With My Pursuit of Happiness]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Every House in the Westerlands, as virtually all the gold mines in Westeros are here, making these Houses obscenely rich, especially the Great House, House Lannister. This is implied to be a philosophy of Tywin Lannister's in particular, and also Tyrion Lannister's. Like father, like son. Tyrion's go-to solution in problematic situations is to attempt to buy his way out. However, his particular skill is offering money in a charismatic and audacious way, which allows him to win the loyalty of those he pays off. Even the lower Westerlands Houses can get in on this considering the Lannister fortunes have enriched almost every noble house of the region. However, it can and has backfired spectacularly when the target decides that they're insulted by the idea of being bought by some rich snot. Come Season 4 though, they're running on the ''idea'' that they're ''still'' rich...
* On ''Series/NewsRadio'', Jimmy James is a likable guy in some respects, but he frustrates Dave to no end because he can make up any rules and do anything he wants
Subverted with his unlimited wallet. He secretly bought a newspaper and published a negative review in it just to motivate his staff; he plays around with Jonas Hodges of season 7 of '' Series/TwentyFour''. As the bonuses in one episode; and wealthy head of a government contract army, it is assumed he's motivated more by a sadistic sense of fun rather than bottom line profit in terms of whether to give Matthew his job back.
* One of the first examples on TV was probably Thurston Howell, III on ''Series/GilligansIsland''. He kept trying to constantly bribe the rather gullible Gilligan into
doing things for him. It doesn't work.
* ''Series/LawAndOrder'' often has these characters as defendants, as they usually hire the best lawyers; a RecurringCharacter named Arthur [[PunnyName Gold]] putting in an appearance is a dead giveaway. If anyone's likely to get away with murder on these shows, it's them.
** Gold seems to have been replaced as the go-to shyster by [[Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit SVU's]] Lionel Granger.
* Anyone with the last name Luthor on ''Series/{{Smallville}}''. [[spoiler:Which includes Tess Mercer.]]
** [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Oliver]], when not busy CrimefightingWithCash.
* Edward Vogler in Season 1 of ''Series/{{House}}'' starts running the hospital like an EvilOverlord, making calls about things like a dying cancer patient getting a C-Section, purely because he can threaten to withdraw a 100 million dollar donation if everybody doesn't say "How high?" whenever he says "Jump!"
** [[spoiler:Eventually subverted when he begins attempting to pick off board members who stand up to him; the rest of the board finally says, effectively, "Screw your money, we're going home."]]
** Much later in the series, a wealthy man ''demands'' that House be the one that treats his son (as it turns out, House [[spoiler:had his license revoked]], but they go along with this anyway. Eventually, when even House can't figure out how to save his son, the man acknowledges that
what he's been practicing this trope all his life and blames the fact that his wife is dead and his son dying on "[[LaserGuidedKarma the karma]]", and tries doing to reverse it by giving up his entire fortune. [[spoiler:The kid ''does'' get better...but the idiot still lost almost everything. WhatAnIdiot...]]
*** What makes it worse is that he was specifically told that dissolving
ensure his company would make hundreds of workers redundant...gets contracts. It's revealed that he actually feels he's providing a service and he did it ''anyway'', which if anything would make karma even protecting the country. The money is actually the last thing on his mind.
* On ''Series/{{Angel}}'', the law firm Wolfram and Hart (it's actually
more pissed at him.
* Stephanie Forrester
of a MegaCorp) existed essentially to help its clients screw the rules as much as they could afford. A good example of this came from ''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful''. She has gotten away with accomplice to rape, harbouring a fugitive Russel Winters, who used Wolfram and accomplice-after-the-fact Hart to murder. Among other things.
help him get around rules both legal, such as "don't eat young women", and supernatural, such as [[MustBeInvited being unable to enter homes without an invitation]]. He simply owned the building. As CEO, Angel offhandedly remarks that they kinda, sorta... "own" the police.
* ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment''''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'':



* The Ferengi in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' [[PlanetOfHats have money and greed as their hat.]] Interestingly, they aren't following the exact definition of this trope, as the rules of the Ferengi Alliance allow for bribery. So it's closer to "According to the rules, I can do whatever I want, here's my money."
* Victor Kiriakis and Stefano [=DiMera=] (and their respective children) from ''Series/DaysOfOurLives''.
* Subverted with Jonas Hodges of season 7 of '' Series/TwentyFour''. As the wealthy head of a government contract army, it is assumed he's doing what he's doing to ensure his company gets contracts. It's revealed that he actually feels he's providing a service and protecting the country. The money is actually the last thing on his mind.
* Much of the cast of ''Series/{{Dallas}}'' or ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': Simon manages to do both at the same time. He gives up his fortune to save River, thereby saying ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules. He also uses his money to rescue River in defiance of the law.
* Becomes a plot point in ''Series/GossipGirl'' where Dan automatically assumes everyone on the UES has this attitude, which causes problems in his relationship with Serena. Has been played straight, or at least been attempted to, on a few occasions, yet not nearly as often as one might expect.
* Sugar from ''Series/{{Glee}}'' is a more toned-down version of this trope.
* ''Series/ICarly'': The Petographers in "iMove Out" get away with trashing the iCarly studio because they have bribed [[SignsOfDisrepair Officer Carl]] by taking free pictures of his daughter's pet bunny rabbit. Officer Carl even proceeds to give the trio a fine, [[RefugeInAudacity because their half-car prop stuck into the studio wall doesn't have a license plate.]]
* On ''Series/{{Angel}}'', the law firm Wolfram and Hart (it's actually more of a MegaCorp) existed essentially to help its clients screw the rules as much as they could afford. A good example of this came from Russel Winters, who used Wolfram and Hart to help him get around rules both legal, such as "don't eat young women", and supernatural, such as [[MustBeInvited being unable to enter homes without an invitation]]. He simply owned the building. As CEO, Angel offhandedly remarks that they kinda, sorta... "own" the police.

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* The Ferengi in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' [[PlanetOfHats have money and greed as their hat.]] Interestingly, they aren't following the exact definition of this trope, as the rules of the Ferengi Alliance allow for bribery. So it's closer to "According to the rules, I can do whatever I want, here's my money."
* Victor Kiriakis and Stefano [=DiMera=] (and their respective children)
Stephanie Forrester from ''Series/DaysOfOurLives''.
* Subverted with Jonas Hodges of season 7 of '' Series/TwentyFour''. As the wealthy head of a government contract army, it is assumed he's doing what he's doing to ensure his company gets contracts. It's revealed that he actually feels he's providing a service and protecting the country. The money is actually the last thing on his mind.
* Much of the cast of ''Series/{{Dallas}}'' or ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': Simon manages to do both at the same time. He gives up his fortune to save River, thereby saying ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules. He also uses his money to rescue River in defiance of the law.
* Becomes a plot point in ''Series/GossipGirl'' where Dan automatically assumes everyone on the UES
''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful''. She has this attitude, which causes problems in his relationship with Serena. Has been played straight, or at least been attempted to, on a few occasions, yet not nearly as often as one might expect.
* Sugar from ''Series/{{Glee}}'' is a more toned-down version of this trope.
* ''Series/ICarly'': The Petographers in "iMove Out" get
gotten away with trashing accomplice to rape, harbouring a fugitive and accomplice-after-the-fact to murder. Among other things.
* Averted on ''Series/{{Bones}}'' with Jack Hodgins, who's
the iCarly studio because they have bribed [[SignsOfDisrepair Officer Carl]] by taking free pictures owner of his daughter's pet bunny rabbit. Officer Carl even proceeds to give a company that owns practically the trio whole Jeffersonian and a fine, [[RefugeInAudacity because their half-car prop stuck into the studio wall lot of other stuff, but he doesn't have a license plate.]]
* On ''Series/{{Angel}}'',
put himself above the law firm Wolfram and Hart (it's actually more of rules. Also a MegaCorp) existed essentially to help its clients screw the rules as much as they could afford. A good example of ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules.
* Happened pretty frequently on ''Series/BostonLegal''.
%%** Denny Crane lives by
this came from Russel Winters, who used Wolfram trope.
** Daniel Post uses his wealth to corrupt cancer studies
and Hart buy human organs in order to help him get around rules both legal, such as "don't eat young women", and supernatural, such as [[MustBeInvited being unable try to enter homes without an invitation]]. He simply owned the building. As CEO, Angel offhandedly remarks that they kinda, sorta... "own" the police.cure his own lung cancer.



* This is George Hearst's MO on ''Series/{{Deadwood}}''; he and Aunt Lou's son have an extended conversation about this very point.
* Subverted in ''Series/{{Monk}}'' with Dale "The Whale" J. Biederbeck III. Although he does have control over various people's actions as well as being filthy rich, the primary reason why he gets away with any crime is because they think he couldn't possibly do it because, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as his nickname implies]], [[FatBastard he is so fat that he can't even get out of his bed, never mind out of his door.]] Monk proves them wrong, and he is arrested via a crane.
* Greg Proops once stated Drew Carey as being "a man who looks death in the eye and goes 'Har Har! I don't care, I'm rich!'"
* Happened pretty frequently on ''Series/BostonLegal''.
** Denny Crane lives by this trope.
** Daniel Post uses his wealth to corrupt cancer studies and buy human organs in order to try to cure his own lung cancer.
* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' gives us Peter Stone, a {{rich b|itch}}astard who films Drunk!Manny stripping and makes it into a meme, but still dates her best friend Emma. In the next season, Emma's ex-boyfriend Sean, who is the school's hero after saving them all from a shooting, comes back, and Peter plants drugs in his locker. Then Peter and Sean start racing, and Peter goes to jail. His mother was the principal.
* ''Series/RaisingTheBar'' has Richard Woolsley, a public defence attorney from an extremely wealthy family who tries to invoke this trope for the good of his clients. Subverted when his boss makes him understand why he cannot and asks to him to follow the rules. Invoked heroically yet again when he [[spoiler:uses his money to set up a civil law division so his clients can have access to appropriate legal support after their criminal cases]].
* Averted on ''Series/{{Bones}}'' with Jack Hodgins, who's the owner of a company that owns practically the whole Jeffersonian and a lot of other stuff, but he doesn't put himself above the rules. Also a ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules.

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* This is George Hearst's MO on ''Series/{{Deadwood}}''; he %%* ''Series/ColdCase'': The brothers Todd and Aunt Lou's son have an extended conversation about this very point.
* Subverted
Eric in ''Series/{{Monk}}'' with Dale "The Whale" J. Biederbeck III. Although he does have control over various people's actions as well as being filthy rich, the primary reason why he gets away with any crime is because they think he couldn't possibly do it because, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as his nickname implies]], [[FatBastard he is so fat that he can't even get out of his bed, never mind out of his door.]] Monk proves them wrong, and he is ''Look Again'' were initially not arrested via a crane.
based on this.
* Greg Proops once stated Drew Carey as being "a man who looks death in ''Series/CopRock'': the eye and goes 'Har Har! I don't care, I'm rich!'"
* Happened pretty frequently on ''Series/BostonLegal''.
** Denny Crane lives by this trope.
** Daniel Post uses his wealth to corrupt cancer studies and buy human organs in order to try to cure his own lung cancer.
* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' gives us Peter Stone, a {{rich b|itch}}astard who films Drunk!Manny stripping and makes it into a meme, but still dates her best friend Emma. In the next season, Emma's ex-boyfriend Sean, who is the school's hero after saving them all from a shooting, comes back, and Peter plants drugs in his locker. Then Peter and Sean start racing, and Peter goes to jail. His mother was the principal.
* ''Series/RaisingTheBar'' has Richard Woolsley, a public defence attorney from an extremely wealthy family who tries to invoke this trope
upper class people arrested for the good of his clients. Subverted when his boss makes him understand why he cannot and asks to him to follow the rules. Invoked heroically yet again when he [[spoiler:uses his money to set up a civil law division so his clients can have access to appropriate legal support after their criminal cases]].
* Averted on ''Series/{{Bones}}'' with Jack Hodgins, who's the owner of a company
using narcotics sing that owns practically the whole Jeffersonian and a lot they should be ignored since they pay high taxes. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cftN2nimH3s Cop Rock - Don't Mess With My Pursuit of other stuff, but he doesn't put himself above the rules. Also a ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules.Happiness]].



%%* Much of the cast of ''Series/{{Dallas}}'' or ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
%%* Victor Kiriakis and Stefano [=DiMera=] (and their respective children) from ''Series/DaysOfOurLives''.
%%* This is George Hearst's MO on ''Series/{{Deadwood}}''; he and Aunt Lou's son have an extended conversation about this very point.
* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' gives us Peter Stone, a {{rich b|itch}}astard who films Drunk!Manny stripping and makes it into a meme, but still dates her best friend Emma. In the next season, Emma's ex-boyfriend Sean, who is the school's hero after saving them all from a shooting, comes back, and Peter plants drugs in his locker. Then Peter and Sean start racing, and Peter goes to jail. His mother was the principal.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'': In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS37E4ArachnidsInTheUK "Arachnids in the UK"]], CorruptCorporateExecutive Jack Robertson attempts to bribe the Doctor, her companions Ryan, Graham and Yaz, Yaz's mum Najia and scientist Jade [=McIntyre=] with enough money that they'll never have to work again so they don't reveal evidence of his shoddy business practices, but Najia shoots back that she likes working.
%%* Greg Proops once stated Drew Carey as being "a man who looks death in the eye and goes 'Har Har! I don't care, I'm rich!'"
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': Simon manages to do both at the same time. He gives up his fortune to save River, thereby saying ScrewTheMoneyIHaveRules. He also uses his money to rescue River in defiance of the law.



* The Graysons in ''Series/{{Revenge}}'' seem to live on this trope. Watching their every attempt to invoke this blow up in their faces is...satisfying.
* The usual crew in ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' had a fantasy of if they were to strike oil in the Pipe Dreams episode, how incredibly rich the school would be. Zack, to the teacher who reminded them about the test that day and that it was a rule says, "We have money, so there are no rules!" Being born in '86 and watching SBTB growing up, Zack was the only one I saw with a mobile phone in the 90's AND I think his dad was a lawyer...I always thought it was a big plothole in that Zack was obsessed with becoming rich!
* In a mid-season one episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'', Finch gets a doctor to treat his critically injured partner without reporting the gunshot wound as required by law by handing over a bag with six or seven figures worth of cash in it. He also routinely uses his vast fortune to get Reese the access he needs for his investigations.
** In contrast to Finch's [[CrimeFightingWithCash use]] of the trope, the series has quite a few examples of the CorruptCorporateExecutive among its minor villains.
* London Tipton in ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'' seems to think that rich people are above the law. One of her fellow air headed rich friends responds to a saying her dad said ("There's two things rich people never do: Apologize and pay taxes") with this:
-->'''Friend''': My daddy said the same thing...the last time I visited him in prison.
* The whole premise of ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' is to use means of dubious legality to ''fight'' such types and help the "little guys" who got screwed:
--> '''Nate Ford:''' (''intro'') The rich and powerful, they take what they want. We steal it back for you. Sometimes bad guys make the best good guys. We provide... ''[[TitleDrop leverage]]''.
* Series/ColdCase: The brothers Todd and Eric in ''Look Again'' were initially not arrested based on this.

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* The Graysons ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Every House in ''Series/{{Revenge}}'' seem the Westerlands, as virtually all the gold mines in Westeros are here, making these Houses obscenely rich, especially the Great House, House Lannister. This is implied to live on this trope. Watching their every be a philosophy of Tywin Lannister's in particular, and also Tyrion Lannister's. Like father, like son. Tyrion's go-to solution in problematic situations is to attempt to invoke buy his way out. However, his particular skill is offering money in a charismatic and audacious way, which allows him to win the loyalty of those he pays off. Even the lower Westerlands Houses can get in on this blow up in their faces is...satisfying.
* The usual crew in ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' had a fantasy of if they were to strike oil in
considering the Pipe Dreams episode, how incredibly rich the school would be. Zack, to the teacher who reminded them about the test that day and that it was a rule says, "We Lannister fortunes have money, so there are no rules!" Being born in '86 and watching SBTB growing up, Zack was the only one I saw with a mobile phone in the 90's AND I think his dad was a lawyer...I always thought it was a big plothole in that Zack was obsessed with becoming rich!
* In a mid-season one episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'', Finch gets a doctor to treat his critically injured partner without reporting the gunshot wound as required by law by handing over a bag with six or seven figures worth of cash in it. He also routinely uses his vast fortune to get Reese the access he needs for his investigations.
** In contrast to Finch's [[CrimeFightingWithCash use]]
enriched almost every noble house of the trope, region. However, it can and has backfired spectacularly when the series has quite a few examples of the CorruptCorporateExecutive among its minor villains.
* London Tipton in ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'' seems to think
target decides that they're insulted by the idea of being bought by some rich people are above snot. Come Season 4 though, they're running on the law. One of her fellow air headed rich friends responds to a saying her dad said ("There's two things rich people never do: Apologize and pay taxes") with this:
-->'''Friend''': My daddy said the same thing...the last time I visited him in prison.
* The whole premise of ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' is to use means of dubious legality to ''fight'' such types and help the "little guys" who got screwed:
--> '''Nate Ford:''' (''intro'') The rich and powerful, they take what they want. We steal it back for you. Sometimes bad guys make the best good guys. We provide... ''[[TitleDrop leverage]]''.
* Series/ColdCase: The brothers Todd and Eric in ''Look Again'' were initially not arrested based on this.
''idea'' that they're ''still'' rich...



* One of the first examples on TV was probably Thurston Howell III on ''Series/GilligansIsland''. He kept trying to constantly bribe the rather gullible Gilligan into doing things for him. It doesn't work.
%%* Sugar from ''Series/{{Glee}}'' is a more toned-down version of this trope.
* Becomes a plot point in ''Series/GossipGirl'' where Dan automatically assumes everyone on the UES has this attitude, which causes problems in his relationship with Serena. Has been played straight, or at least been attempted to, on a few occasions, yet not nearly as often as one might expect.
* Edward Vogler in Season 1 of ''Series/{{House}}'' starts running the hospital like an EvilOverlord, making calls about things like a dying cancer patient getting a C-Section, purely because he can threaten to withdraw a 100 million dollar donation if everybody doesn't say "How high?" whenever he says "Jump!"
** [[spoiler:Eventually subverted when he begins attempting to pick off board members who stand up to him; the rest of the board finally says, effectively, "Screw your money, we're going home."]]
** Much later in the series, a wealthy man ''demands'' that House be the one that treats his son (as it turns out, House [[spoiler:had his license revoked]], but they go along with this anyway. Eventually, when even House can't figure out how to save his son, the man acknowledges that he's been practicing this trope all his life and blames the fact that his wife is dead and his son dying on "[[LaserGuidedKarma the karma]]", and tries to reverse it by giving up his entire fortune. [[spoiler:The kid ''does'' get better...but the idiot still lost almost everything. WhatAnIdiot...]]
*** What makes it worse is that he was specifically told that dissolving his company would make hundreds of workers redundant...and he did it ''anyway'', which if anything would make karma even more pissed at him.
* ''Series/ICarly'': The Petographers in "iMove Out" get away with trashing the iCarly studio because they have bribed [[SignsOfDisrepair Officer Carl]] by taking free pictures of his daughter's pet bunny rabbit. Officer Carl even proceeds to give the trio a fine, [[RefugeInAudacity because their half-car prop stuck into the studio wall doesn't have a license plate.]]
* ''Series/LawAndOrder'' often has these characters as defendants, as they usually hire the best lawyers; a RecurringCharacter named Arthur [[PunnyName Gold]] putting in an appearance is a dead giveaway. If anyone's likely to get away with murder on these shows, it's them.
** Gold seems to have been replaced as the go-to shyster by [[Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit SVU's]] Lionel Granger.
* The whole premise of ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' is to use means of dubious legality to ''fight'' such types and help the "little guys" who got screwed:
-->'''Nate Ford:''' (''intro'') The rich and powerful, they take what they want. We steal it back for you. Sometimes bad guys make the best good guys. We provide... ''[[TitleDrop leverage]]''.
* Subverted in ''Series/{{Monk}}'' with Dale "The Whale" J. Biederbeck III. Although he does have control over various people's actions as well as being filthy rich, the primary reason why he gets away with any crime is because they think he couldn't possibly do it because, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as his nickname implies]], [[FatBastard he is so fat that he can't even get out of his bed, never mind out of his door.]] Monk proves them wrong, and he is arrested via a crane.
* On ''Series/NewsRadio'', Jimmy James is a likable guy in some respects, but he frustrates Dave to no end because he can make up any rules and do anything he wants with his unlimited wallet. He secretly bought a newspaper and published a negative review in it just to motivate his staff; he plays around with the bonuses in one episode; and he's motivated more by a sadistic sense of fun rather than bottom line profit in terms of whether to give Matthew his job back.
* In a mid-season one episode of ''Series/PersonOfInterest'', Finch gets a doctor to treat his critically injured partner without reporting the gunshot wound as required by law by handing over a bag with six or seven figures worth of cash in it. He also routinely uses his vast fortune to get Reese the access he needs for his investigations.
** In contrast to Finch's [[CrimeFightingWithCash use]] of the trope, the series has quite a few examples of the CorruptCorporateExecutive among its minor villains.
* ''Series/RaisingTheBar'' has Richard Woolsley, a public defence attorney from an extremely wealthy family who tries to invoke this trope for the good of his clients. Subverted when his boss makes him understand why he cannot and asks to him to follow the rules. Invoked heroically yet again when he [[spoiler:uses his money to set up a civil law division so his clients can have access to appropriate legal support after their criminal cases]].
* The Graysons in ''Series/{{Revenge}}'' seem to live on this trope. Watching their every attempt to invoke this blow up in their faces is...satisfying.
* The usual crew in ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' had a fantasy of if they were to strike oil in the Pipe Dreams episode, how incredibly rich the school would be. Zack, to the teacher who reminded them about the test that day and that it was a rule says, "We have money, so there are no rules!" Being born in '86 and watching SBTB growing up, Zack was the only one I saw with a mobile phone in the 90's AND I think his dad was a lawyer...I always thought it was a big plothole in that Zack was obsessed with becoming rich!
* Anyone with the last name Luthor on ''Series/{{Smallville}}''. [[spoiler:Which includes Tess Mercer.]]
** [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Oliver]], when not busy CrimefightingWithCash.
* The Ferengi in ''Franchise/StarTrek'' [[PlanetOfHats have money and greed as their hat.]] Interestingly, they aren't following the exact definition of this trope, as the rules of the Ferengi Alliance allow for bribery. So it's closer to "According to the rules, I can do whatever I want, here's my money."
* London Tipton in ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'' seems to think that rich people are above the law. One of her fellow air headed rich friends responds to a saying her dad said ("There's two things rich people never do: Apologize and pay taxes") with this:
-->'''Friend''': My daddy said the same thing... the last time I visited him in prison.



[[folder: Professional Wrestling ]]

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[[folder: Professional Wrestling ]][[folder:Professional Wrestling]]


* [[http://www.star-crossedcomic.com/fnr/fnr_3_12.html 'When you find yourself presented with a problem, and all else fails, throw some money at it.']]

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