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* ''TabletopGame/GURPSIlluminatiUniversity'' is set in a very weird pun-filled interdimensional university where wizards, demons, aliens and budding mad scientists happily mingle.


* ''Film/ElectricDreams'': A 1980s era home computer achieves sentience because it's owner accidentally spills sparkling wine on the keyboard. It also seizes control of all the household appliances, and starts writing love songs for it's owner's girlfriend (much like ''Theatre/CyranoDeBergerac''). Naturally, a LoveTriangle Ensues.

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* ''Film/ElectricDreams'': A 1980s era home computer achieves sentience because it's its owner accidentally spills sparkling wine on the keyboard. It also seizes control of all the household appliances, and starts writing love songs for it's owner's girlfriend (much like ''Theatre/CyranoDeBergerac''). Naturally, a LoveTriangle Ensues.


* SignificantSketchbook: Hikaru's sketchbook summons the fairy Fuwa and later transforms into the Twinkle Book.
* StellarName: The Cures take their names from things related to the sky and outer space.

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* ''Anime/StarTwinklePrettyCure'' is a MagicalGirl show whose theme is outer space, and one of the magical girls is a [[HumanAliens Human Alien]]. Many of the villains are also based on various {{Youkai}} despite being aliens, in a similar vein to ''Manga/UruseiYatsura''.
* SignificantSketchbook: Hikaru's sketchbook summons the fairy Fuwa and later transforms into the Twinkle Book.
* StellarName: The Cures take their names from things related to the sky and outer space.


* While ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' is already an example, ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''/''Literature/TheHobbit''/''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''/''Machinema/RedVsBlue'' FusionFic ''Fanfic/RiseOfAStarKnight'', and its sequel ''Fanfic/KnightsOfRemnantTheRingOfDarkness'', fit this even better, with the [[MagicKnight Star Knights]] and their personal armies, the [[BadassArmy Sky Knights]], being far more public than the Maidens, cavalry charges on [[MyHorseIsAMotorbike motorcycles]] by knights with [[SwissArmyWeapon gun-spears]], {{Mithril}}, Grimm orcs and Uruk Hai being lead by [[spoiler: a rogue cyborg SuperSoldier]], [[TheClan the Valkyrie family]] acting as the equivalent of the dwarves, goblins[[note]]Descendants of [[LittleBitBeastly Faunus]] who hid in the mountains and were separated from the rest of their kind for so long they evolved into something else[[/note]], [[ArtifactOfDoom the various Artifacts Of Doom]] from the Lord of the Rings, etc. Basically, it has more fantasy elements (taken from the [[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings granddaddy]] of them all) than ''RWBY'', and as such mixes them more with sci-fi (The aforementioned Sky Knights are loyal to [[MagicKnight Magic Knights]], but fight using tanks and MiniMecha, or make cavalry charges on motorcycles and trucks, Moria had a tramway before it was overrun by orcs, etc.).

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* While ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' is already an example, ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''/''Literature/TheHobbit''/''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''/''Machinema/RedVsBlue'' ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}''/''Literature/TheHobbit''/''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''/''Machinima/RedVsBlue'' FusionFic ''Fanfic/RiseOfAStarKnight'', and its sequel ''Fanfic/KnightsOfRemnantTheRingOfDarkness'', fit this even better, with the [[MagicKnight Star Knights]] and their personal armies, the [[BadassArmy Sky Knights]], being far more public than the Maidens, cavalry charges on [[MyHorseIsAMotorbike motorcycles]] by knights with [[SwissArmyWeapon gun-spears]], {{Mithril}}, Grimm orcs and Uruk Hai being lead by [[spoiler: a rogue cyborg SuperSoldier]], [[TheClan the Valkyrie family]] acting as the equivalent of the dwarves, goblins[[note]]Descendants of [[LittleBitBeastly Faunus]] who hid in the mountains and were separated from the rest of their kind for so long they evolved into something else[[/note]], [[ArtifactOfDoom the various Artifacts Of Doom]] from the Lord of the Rings, etc. Basically, it has more fantasy elements (taken from the [[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings granddaddy]] of them all) than ''RWBY'', and as such mixes them more with sci-fi (The aforementioned Sky Knights are loyal to [[MagicKnight Magic Knights]], but fight using tanks and MiniMecha, or make cavalry charges on motorcycles and trucks, Moria had a tramway before it was overrun by orcs, etc.).



* ''Podcast/MetamorCity'' is a LayeredMetropolis inhabited by humans [[Literature/MetamorKeep transformed by a regional curse]], elves, [[OurOrcsAreDifferent lutins]], demons, celestials, vampires, mages both licensed and unlicensed, and psionics. They've also got FlyingCars and several varieties of {{Cyberpunk}} technology.

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* ''Podcast/MetamorCity'' is a LayeredMetropolis inhabited by humans [[Literature/MetamorKeep transformed by a regional curse]], elves, [[OurOrcsAreDifferent lutins]], demons, celestials, vampires, mages both licensed and unlicensed, and psionics. They've also got FlyingCars {{Flying Car}}s and several varieties of {{Cyberpunk}} technology.


* ''VideoGame/TheSims'' start out fairly grounded in everyday life, but with the expansion packs they turn into textbook Science-Fantasy. Science-Fiction elements include aliens, (complete with [[AlienAbduction abductions]] and a FaceFullOfAlienWingWong), TimeTravel, [[JetPack jet packs]], RobotBuddies who can think and feel like real Sims, [[RobotMaid smaller robots]] helping around the house, travelling to other planets, [[WeatherControlMachine weather control machines]], and so much more. Fantasy elements include [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]], [[GenieInABottle genies]], [[OurGhostsAreDifferent ghosts]], TheGrimReaper, magic, witches and wizards, [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]], [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], [[VoodooDoll voodoo dolls]], potions and [[AlchemyIsMagic alchemy]]... the list goes on.

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* ''VideoGame/TheSims'' start out fairly grounded in everyday life, but with the expansion packs they turn into textbook Science-Fantasy. Science-Fiction elements include aliens, (complete with [[AlienAbduction abductions]] and a FaceFullOfAlienWingWong), TimeTravel, [[JetPack jet packs]], RobotBuddies {{Robot Budd|y}}ies who can think and feel like real Sims, [[RobotMaid smaller robots]] helping around the house, travelling to other planets, [[WeatherControlMachine weather control machines]], and so much more. Fantasy elements include [[OurZombiesAreDifferent zombies]], [[GenieInABottle genies]], [[OurGhostsAreDifferent ghosts]], TheGrimReaper, magic, witches and wizards, [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]], [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], [[VoodooDoll voodoo dolls]], potions and [[AlchemyIsMagic alchemy]]... the list goes on.


Science fantasy may also arguably describe character oriented stories where the fantastic elements are very subtle and are common to both science fiction and fantasy. Examples could include ParanormalRomance which just happens to involve AppliedPhlebotinum, [[TimeTravelRomance TimeTravel]] or ArtificialIntelligence. Many such stories strive to keep the fantastic elements understated (often in the form of minimal SpecialEffects) in the interest of focusing on human drama.

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Science fantasy may also arguably describe character oriented stories where the fantastic elements are very subtle and are common to both science fiction and fantasy. Examples could include ParanormalRomance which just happens to involve AppliedPhlebotinum, [[TimeTravelRomance TimeTravel]] Time Travel]] or ArtificialIntelligence. Many such stories strive to keep the fantastic elements understated (often in the form of minimal SpecialEffects) in the interest of focusing on human drama.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ewoks}}'', being set in the ''Franchise/StarWars'' universe, naturally shares its progenitor's blending of sci-fi and fantasy tropes. It leans much further towards the fantastical side if anything, in no small part because Endor is a world ruled by Stone Age cultures, with Force powers more overtly functioning akin to magic; shapeshifting, [[DishingOutDirt geokinesis]] and curses show up as Force powers in this setting, when traditional Force powers are more rooted in telepathy and telekinesis. Endor could easily be a non-humanocentric fantasy world, up until you see the episodes with visiting spaceships, laser-toting soldiers and robots interacting with the spear-wielding, spirit-worshipping hunters.


* The ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Gamera}}'' franchises have monsters of both magical and scientific origin fighting or teaming up with each other, sometimes within the same movie.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Gamera}}'' ''Film/{{Gamera}}'' franchises have monsters of both magical and scientific origin fighting or teaming up with each other, sometimes within the same movie.


* ''Anime/SailorMoon'' is ''largely'' an UrbanFantasy MagicalGirlWarrior series, but the ''S'' season shifts toward this, due to the first BigBad being a MadScientist using technologically-created Daimons in his quest for magical talismans. Also, throughout the series, the majority of monsters are extraplanetary aliens of some kind.

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* ''Anime/SailorMoon'' is ''largely'' an UrbanFantasy MagicalGirlWarrior series, but the ''S'' season shifts toward this, due to the first BigBad being a MadScientist using technologically-created Daimons in his quest for magical talismans. Also, throughout the series, The Sailor Guardians were also HumanAliens in [[{{Reincarnation}} their past lives]], and the majority of monsters are extraplanetary aliens of some kind.


* ''VideoGame/{{Paladins}}'' takes place in Crosswind Hold, where champions fight with either magic, technology, or {{Magitek}} and have the appearances to match, such as Viktor's very modern frag grenades and assault rifle and Kinessa's futuristic sniper rifle up against Torvald's stone-tech powerfist and Seris' soul-powered lantern. While there was a more even mix in closed beta, the sci-fi aspects have been downplayed in open beta, with more fantasy champions being added and redesigning some of the older champions to look less sci-fi, such as Ruckus' mech going from a cartoonish, Mechwarrior-esque steel fighter to a wood-and-metal steam-powered lifter. This aversion to sci-fi seems to have been done to make ''Paladins'' stand out from other [[HeroShooter Hero Shooters]], such as the sci-fi heavy ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'' and SpaceOpera ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}''.

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* Early in ''VideoGame/{{Paladins}}'' takes place in Crosswind Hold, where development, champions fight fought with either magic, technology, or {{Magitek}} and have the appearances to match, such as Viktor's very modern frag grenades and assault rifle and Kinessa's futuristic sniper rifle up against Torvald's stone-tech powerfist and Seris' soul-powered lantern. While there was a more even mix in closed beta, However, by the time the game fully released, the sci-fi aspects have been downplayed in open beta, were removed, with more fantasy champions being added and redesigning some of the older champions to look less sci-fi, such as Ruckus' mech going from a cartoonish, Mechwarrior-esque steel fighter to a wood-and-metal steam-powered lifter.lifter. Now ''Paladins'' has more of a DungeonPunk angle. This aversion to sci-fi seems to have been done to make ''Paladins'' stand out from other [[HeroShooter Hero Shooters]], such as the sci-fi heavy ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'' and SpaceOpera ''VideoGame/{{Battleborn}}''.


* ''Anime/SailorMoon'' is ''largely'' UrbanFantasy, but the ''S'' season shifts toward this, due to the first BigBad being a MadScientist using technologically-created Daimons in his quest for magical talismans. Also, throughout the series, the majority of monsters are extraplanetary aliens of some kind.

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* ''Anime/SailorMoon'' is ''largely'' UrbanFantasy, an UrbanFantasy MagicalGirlWarrior series, but the ''S'' season shifts toward this, due to the first BigBad being a MadScientist using technologically-created Daimons in his quest for magical talismans. Also, throughout the series, the majority of monsters are extraplanetary aliens of some kind.



* ''Manga/UruseiYatsura'' technically may be a sci-fi, but essentially all of the aliens are some form of {{Youkai}} from Myth/JapaneseMythology: Lum is from the Planet Oni, Yuki the yuki-onna is from Neptune, etc. In practice, anything from Science Fiction or Fantasy can happen from TimeTravel to UsefulNotes/{{Onmyodo}} exorcisms, [[RuleOfFunny so long as it's funny]].

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* ''Manga/UruseiYatsura'' technically may be a sci-fi, but essentially all of the aliens are some form of {{Youkai}} from Myth/JapaneseMythology: Lum is from the Planet Oni, Yuki {{Oni}}, Oyuki the yuki-onna YukiOnna is from Neptune, etc. In practice, anything from Science Fiction or Fantasy can happen from TimeTravel to UsefulNotes/{{Onmyodo}} exorcisms, [[RuleOfFunny so long as it's funny]].


** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.

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** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The the Union of Aracana, Arcana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The the Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.


* ''Film/PrisonersOfTheLostUniverse'' has humans from a modern Earth enter a HeroicFantasy type world via a dimensional transporter.



* ''Film/PrisonersOfTheLostUniverse'' has humans from a modern Earth enter a HeroicFantasy type world via a dimensional transporter.



* OlderThanPrint; 1321's ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' imagines an afterlife in the physical universe as Medieval astronomers and scientists knew it. For example, as Dante enters Heaven with the soul of his deceased lover, Dante realizes he is on the Moon and theorizes why the Moon has black spots (that we now know to be craters) on it. His saintly lover criticizes his concepts on "rarity and density" of matter and proves his theory to be invalid. It should be noted Dante isn't ultimately concerned with physical science, as even this exchange on the Moon ends with a theological point. More specifically, the lover uses the dispute to reveal to Dante how the Moon, the stars, and anything made of matter relies on the will and love of [[{{God}} the Deep Mind]] to exist at all.



* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey:
** The ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' books feature intelligent, telepathic, teleporting, and occasionally time-traveling dragons. These are just genetically engineered upgrades of preexisting diminutive "dragons", which have similar powers, though this LostTechnology aspect isn't explored until the prequels. Later books also feature a supercomputer. [[WordOfGod McCaffrey has always maintained that]] the books are Science Fiction rather than fantasy, as everything is based on hard science, and she has spoken to many authorities in various sciences to work out the specifics of the world and the things that happen on it.
** In ''Literature/TheShipWhoWon'', a RolePlayingGame-obsessed space ship crew discovers a planet where magic actually works. ([[spoiler:Until they discover the inhabitants are just abusing a [[MagicFromTechnology Sufficiently Advanced]] weather-control system]]). Definitely sold as Sci-Fi.
** ''[[Literature/AcornaSeries Acorna]]'' and sequels are about a foundling creature who looks like a "unicorn girl," complete with a horn on her forehead, unearthly beauty, and the power to purify water and air. Except she's not exactly magical: she's an alien, and the setting is basic science fiction with spaceships and interplanetary travel. Double subverted when it is revealed that her species is genetically-engineered by aliens who combined their own DNA with that of unicorns they rescued from Earth.



** Someone once described the first book as "Film/DieHard [[RecycledInSpace WITH FAIRIES]]". Apt.
* Literature/BelisariusSeries has sword-bearing warriors, robots, scizo-tech, time-travel, visions of the future, and all, all mixed up.
* J.S. Morin's "Black Ocean" series takes place in an alternate future version of our own reality, where sleek computer equipment can be fried by a wizard having a tantrum, spaceships travel through the Astral Plane instead of hyperspace, and the main characters have magic earrings instead of the usual TranslatorMicrobes.

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** Someone once described the first book as "Film/DieHard "''Film/DieHard'' [[RecycledInSpace WITH FAIRIES]]". Apt.
* Literature/BelisariusSeries The ''Literature/BelisariusSeries'' has sword-bearing warriors, robots, scizo-tech, time-travel, visions of the future, and all, all mixed up.
* J.S. Morin's "Black Ocean" ''Black Ocean'' series takes place in an alternate future version of our own reality, where sleek computer equipment can be fried by a wizard having a tantrum, spaceships travel through the Astral Plane instead of hyperspace, and the main characters have magic earrings instead of the usual TranslatorMicrobes.



* Creator/OrsonScottCard, in the afterword to an audio recording of ''Literature/EndersGame'', talks about trying to sell a short story based in the world of ''Literature/TheWorthingSaga''. He mentions that one of his rejections said that it was a good story, but it wasn't right for the magazine, as it was Fantasy rather than Science Fiction. He said that the reason it was considered Fantasy was because none of the scientific backdrop was present in the story. In the end, he concluded that the only difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction is that "Fantasy has trees, SciFi has rivets."
** His ''Literature/HomecomingSaga'' series is a Science Fantasy reworking of ''Literature/TheBookOfMormon.''
* A lot of Creator/JackChalker's novels and series mixed up the two, often with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible.
** The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is an example of the alien version.
** The ''Literature/SoulRider'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by humans, whose descendants then forgot its origins.
** His ''Four Lords of the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with a sort of alien parasite that provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.



* Creator/DavidWeber is [[Literature/HonorHarrington best known]] for his SpaceOpera and MilitaryScienceFiction, but he occasionally plays with this trope:
** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.
** ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.

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* Creator/DavidWeber is [[Literature/HonorHarrington best known]] for his SpaceOpera and MilitaryScienceFiction, but he occasionally plays with this trope:
** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.
** ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift
OlderThanPrint; 1321's ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' imagines an afterlife in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels physical universe as Medieval astronomers and scientists knew it. For example, as Dante enters Heaven with the soul of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.his deceased lover, Dante realizes he is on the Moon and theorizes why the Moon has black spots (that we now know to be craters) on it. His saintly lover criticizes his concepts on "rarity and density" of matter and proves his theory to be invalid. It should be noted Dante isn't ultimately concerned with physical science, as even this exchange on the Moon ends with a theological point. More specifically, the lover uses the dispute to reveal to Dante how the Moon, the stars, and anything made of matter relies on the will and love of [[{{God}} the Deep Mind]] to exist at all.



* ''Literature/{{Feral}}'' runs on this. While magic does exist, 'wizard' may well be the same as 'scientist', with use of scientific thought and processes throughout the story. The story takes place after its worlds creation of the printing press, and it's stated multiple times that its creation is more important than anything other device. Char, the main character, uses science and magic to create armor and weapons, including a blunderbuss whose gunpowder is lit by a fire rune.



* Julian May's ''Pliocene Exile/Galactic Milieu'' books feature aliens and spaceships, but also planet-shaking psychic powers, elves and goblins. Generally sold as Sci-Fi.
** In all fairness, the elves and goblins are clearly referred to as alien races throughout the series.



* Creator/FritzLeiber's short story "Gonna Roll the Bones" (which scooped up the Hugo ''and'' Nebula for that year) is a classic example of the form, starring a Martian miner matching wits against a casino boss who may or may not be TheDevil himself. Creator/HarlanEllison's glowing review of it notes, "it singlehandedly explains why lines of demarcation between fantasy and science fiction can seldom be drawn."
* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.



* ''Literature/{{Illium}}'', by Dan Simmons, in breathtaking style. There are space robots [[CallARabbitASmeerp called Moravecs]], exotic rocket propulsion, planetary rings, teleportation, a space plane that is the essence of a [[RetroRocket UFO]], and the ''entire Greek Pantheon''. Throughout the book and its sequel, ''Olympos'', the Moravecs are skeptical that these gods are genuinely gods and not some high-tech trickery.



* A lot of Creator/JackChalker's novels and series mixed up the two, often with SufficientlyAdvancedAlien (or sometimes human) tech providing a backdrop in which magical-like effects (sometimes called magic by the user who didn't understand it) were possible.
** The ''Literature/WellWorld'' series is an example of the alien version.
** The ''Literature/SoulRider'' series had the AppliedPhlebotinum created by humans, whose descendants then forgot its origins.
** His ''Four Lords of the Diamond'' series features four planets seeded with a sort of alien parasite that provides people with strange powers, each unique to one of the four planets. The third book in particular involves a planet where people can effectively perform magic, and it's even called magic in the book.
* ''Literature/{{Illium}}'', by Dan Simmons, in breathtaking style. There are space robots [[CallARabbitASmeerp called Moravecs]], exotic rocket propulsion, planetary rings, teleportation, a space plane that is the essense of a [[RetroRocket UFO]], and the ''entire Greek Pantheon''. Throughout the book and its sequel, ''Olympos'', the Moravecs are skeptical that these gods are genuinely gods and not some high-tech trickery.



* A DownplayedTrope example occurs in SpaceOpera series ''Literature/LucifersStar'' by Creator/CTPhipps where people duel with swords, fight with shields, and have nobles. They also possess dragons and unicorns for pets. This is all due to SufficientlyAdvanced science, though with fantasy worlds being a popular archetype to terraform your colony around.
* ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'' mixes spaceships, sentient AI and FTL travel with living shadows, possession and calendar-based RealityWarping.
* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey:
** The ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' books feature intelligent, telepathic, teleporting, and occasionally time-traveling dragons. These are just genetically engineered upgrades of pre-existing diminutive "dragons", which have similar powers, though this LostTechnology aspect isn't explored until the prequels. Later books also feature a supercomputer. [[WordOfGod McCaffrey always maintained that]] the books are Science Fiction rather than fantasy, as everything is based on hard science, and she spoke to many authorities in various sciences to work out the specifics of the world and the things that happen on it.
** In ''Literature/TheShipWhoWon'', a RolePlayingGame-obsessed space ship crew discovers a planet where magic actually works. ([[spoiler:Until they discover the inhabitants are just abusing a [[MagicFromTechnology Sufficiently Advanced]] weather-control system]]). Definitely sold as Sci-Fi.
** ''[[Literature/AcornaSeries Acorna]]'' and sequels are about a foundling creature who looks like a "unicorn girl", complete with a horn on her forehead, unearthly beauty, and the power to purify water and air. Except she's not exactly magical: she's an alien, and the setting is basic science fiction with spaceships and interplanetary travel. Double subverted when it is revealed that her species is genetically-engineered by aliens who combined their own DNA with that of unicorns they rescued from Earth.



* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' is a good example of genre blending. All three books are written as a ''[[Literature/TheBorrowers Borrowers]]''/''[[Literature/TheLittles Littles]]'' sort of "tiny people living undetectably amongst us" story, except that it is revealed that the Nomes are in fact aliens marooned on Earth who have devolved somewhat, who only realize what they are when "The Thing", a mysterious box that one of the characters carries, starts talking and turns out to be a sentient computer.



* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' is a good example of genre blending. All three books are written as a ''[[Literature/TheBorrowers Borrowers]]''/''[[Literature/TheLittles Littles]]'' sort of "tiny people living undetectably amongst us" story, except that it is revealed that the Nomes are in fact aliens marooned on Earth who have devolved somewhat, who only realize what they are when "The Thing", a mysterious box that one of the characters carries, starts talking and turns out to be a sentient computer.
* Creator/OrsonScottCard, in the afterword to an audio recording of ''Literature/EndersGame'', talks about trying to sell a short story based in the world of ''Literature/TheWorthingSaga''. He mentions that one of his rejections said that it was a good story, but it wasn't right for the magazine, as it was Fantasy rather than Science Fiction. He said that the reason it was considered Fantasy was because none of the scientific backdrop was present in the story. In the end, he concluded that the only difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction is that "Fantasy has trees, SciFi has rivets."
** His ''Literature/HomecomingSaga'' series is a Science Fantasy reworking of ''Literature/TheBookOfMormon.''
* According to its author, the universe of ''Literature/PlayPlaces'' is science fantasy and ''not'' scifi, although this has yet to be seen from the ending.
* Creator/RogerZelazny liked to challenge the boundaries between Science Fiction and Fantasy, and was known for blending in elements from Mythology:
** ''Literature/CreaturesOfLightAndDarkness'', often considered a companion novel to ''Lord of Light'', featured ''actual'' Egyptian Gods in a StandardSciFiSetting.
** ''Eye of Cat'' had Native American Gods in a far-future setting.
** ''Jack of Shadows'' takes place on a planet which is half-magic (dark side), and half technological (sunlit side). The titular antihero moves effortlessly between both.
** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with mutant powers--on a far-future colony world.
** ''Literature/{{Roadmarks}}'' mixes science fiction tropes like robots and cyborgs with fantasy tropes like dragons and mystical powers in a setting where characters casually travel the length and breadth of human history. (Reader's choice which side the time travel falls on.)

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* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' is a good example of genre blending. All three books are written as a ''[[Literature/TheBorrowers Borrowers]]''/''[[Literature/TheLittles Littles]]'' sort of "tiny people living undetectably amongst us" story, except that it is revealed that the Nomes are in fact aliens marooned on Earth who have devolved somewhat, who only realize what they are when "The Thing", a mysterious box that one of the characters carries, starts talking and turns out to be a sentient computer.
* Creator/OrsonScottCard, in the afterword to an audio recording of ''Literature/EndersGame'', talks about trying to sell a short story based in the world of ''Literature/TheWorthingSaga''. He mentions that one of his rejections said that it was a good story, but it wasn't right for the magazine, as it was Fantasy rather than Science Fiction. He said that the reason it was considered Fantasy was because none of the scientific backdrop was present in the story. In the end, he concluded that the only difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction is that "Fantasy has trees, SciFi has rivets."
** His ''Literature/HomecomingSaga'' series is a Science Fantasy reworking of ''Literature/TheBookOfMormon.''
* According to its author, the universe of ''Literature/PlayPlaces'' is science fantasy and ''not'' scifi, sci-fi, although this has yet to be seen from the ending.
* Creator/RogerZelazny liked to challenge Julian May's ''Pliocene Exile/Galactic Milieu'' books feature aliens and spaceships, but also planet-shaking psychic powers, elves and goblins. Generally sold as Sci-Fi.
** In all fairness,
the boundaries between Science Fiction elves and Fantasy, and was known for blending goblins are clearly referred to as alien races throughout the series.
* ''Literature/ThePsalmsOfIsaak'' has a sci-fi backstory, being set on [[spoiler:a LostColony of]] Earth AfterTheEnd, with the present, roughly-Renaissance-esque society existing
in elements the ruins of the much more high-tech society that preceded it. Relics from Mythology:
** ''Literature/CreaturesOfLightAndDarkness'',
said society include things like robots... and BloodMagic, with people in-universe often considered having a companion novel to ''Lord hard time determining where science ends and sorcery begins [[spoiler:with the abilities of Light'', featured ''actual'' Egyptian the distant precursor Younger Gods being explicitly described as technological, but so far advanced they might as well be magic even to a modern reader, much less the characters in-story]]. Despite its sci-fi trappings, the series largely plays out as HighFantasy; later books [[DoingInTheWizard do in a StandardSciFiSetting.
** ''Eye of Cat'' had Native American Gods in a far-future setting.
** ''Jack of Shadows'' takes place
several wizards]] but also [[GoingCosmic double down on a planet which is half-magic (dark side), the mystical and half technological (sunlit side). The titular antihero moves effortlessly between both.
** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with mutant powers--on a far-future colony world.
** ''Literature/{{Roadmarks}}''
philosophical thematic elements]].
* J. Eifie Nichols' ''Literature/TheRadiantDawn''
mixes science fiction tropes like robots and cyborgs with (the alien Wutner race), urban fantasy tropes like dragons (the guns used by the defenders to protect the fortress), and mystical powers in a setting where characters casually travel fantasy (the magic used to raise the length and breadth of human history. (Reader's choice which side the time travel falls on.)undead/Dawn's shield).



* Aldrea Alien's Literature/TheRogueKing series starts with spaceships crashing on an alien world, which is largely controlled by gods and the larger population have some form of magic.
* J. Eifie Nichols' Literature/TheRadiantDawn mixes science fiction (the alien Wutner race), urban fantasy (the guns used by the defenders to protect the fortress), and fantasy (the magic used to raise the undead/Dawn's shield).

to:

* Aldrea Alien's Literature/TheRogueKing ''Literature/TheRogueKing'' series starts with spaceships crashing on an alien world, which is largely controlled by gods gods, and the larger population have has some form of magic.
* J. Eifie Nichols' Literature/TheRadiantDawn mixes science fiction (the alien Wutner race), urban fantasy (the guns used by the defenders to protect the fortress), and fantasy (the magic used to raise the undead/Dawn's shield).
magic.



* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.
* The Literature/StarshipsMage series by Creator/GlynnStewart uses magic as the key to faster-than-light travel, allowing humanity to colonize the stars after the war that created mage-kind.

to:

* Creator/SimonRGreen's novels are set in a Verse that's about half supernatural horror/fantasy and half gonzo MadScience.
* The Literature/StarshipsMage ''Literature/StarshipsMage'' series by Creator/GlynnStewart uses magic as the key to faster-than-light travel, allowing humanity to colonize the stars after the war that created mage-kind.



* Eoin Colfer's ''The Supernaturalist'' combines a CyberPunk future with invisble (to all but a very few), soul eating [[spoiler: (or so it appears)]] cryptozoological creatures called Parasites.

to:

* Eoin Colfer's ''The Supernaturalist'' ''Literature/TheSupernaturalist'' combines a CyberPunk future with invisble invisible (to all but a very few), soul eating [[spoiler: (or [[spoiler:(or so it appears)]] cryptozoological creatures called Parasites.



* The 1997 novel Literature/TaleOfTheComet by RolandGreen has an alien ship crashland on a StandardFantasySetting. The survivors and the natives band together to fight a [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Borg]] {{Expy}}, and some of the aliens learn magic by watching a native Wizard.

to:

* The 1997 novel Literature/TaleOfTheComet ''Literature/TaleOfTheComet'' by RolandGreen has an alien ship crashland crash-land on a StandardFantasySetting. The survivors and the natives band together to fight a [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Borg]] {{Expy}}, and some of the aliens learn magic by watching a native Wizard.Wizard.
* In the novella ''Literature/ATasteOfHoney'', fantasy versions of AncientRome and AncientAfrica are combined with interstellar travel, so-called gods using sci-fi gadgets and StockSuperpowers that seem like magic but are actually science. The people fight with spears and swords and the gods use tablets.
* ''Literature/TerraIgnota'' seems like a pure Science Fiction series on the face of it, but the fact that Bridger can work miracles such as bringing toys to life and possibly even resurrecting the dead, which nobody can explain with science, edges it just that tiny bit into Fantasy territory. Due to sufficiently advanced science, there are also pet unicorns and all kinds of other fantastic beasts.



* ''Literature/TheWitchesOfKarres'' by James Schmidt is about a spaceship captain who rescues three little girls who turn out to be the titular witches. Yes, you could call it "psychic powers," but actually everyone in the book calls it "klatha magic."

to:

* Creator/DavidWeber is [[Literature/HonorHarrington best known]] for his SpaceOpera and MilitaryScienceFiction, but he occasionally plays with this trope:
** The ''Literature/HellsGate'' series is about two human civilizations that come into contact with each other through inter-universal portals. One civilization, The Union of Aracana, is a very {{Magitek}} civilization with wizards and genetically engineered dragons, where the main weapons for fighting are swords and crossbows. The second civilization, The Empire of Sharona, has PsychicPowers along with some [[BlatantLies minor advantages]] like rifles, machine guns, cannons, steam engines, trains, armored personnel carriers and battleships. Neither side reacts well to the existence of the other.
** ''Literature/InFuryBorn'' features a SpaceMarine protagonist who is possessed by a literal Greek goddess (one of the Furies, the goddesses of vengeance who torment evildoers). This makes for a somewhat jarring GenreShift in the omnibus edition after Weber added two prequel novels of straight-up MilitaryScienceFiction.
* ''Literature/TheWitchesOfKarres'' by James Schmidt is about a spaceship captain who rescues three little girls who turn out to be the titular witches. Yes, you could call it "psychic powers," powers", but actually everyone in the book calls it "klatha magic."magic".
* ''Literature/TheYoungAncients'' begins as a stock fantasy setting, before learning it's Earth thousands of years AfterTheEnd. The [[PowersAsPrograms magic]] also functions on a TechnoBabble explanation. By book nine of the Magitek industrial revolution, there's Magitek spaceships and a moon colony.



* In the novella ''Literature/ATasteOfHoney'', fantasy versions of AncientRome and AncientAfrica are combined with interstellar travel, so-called gods using sci-fi gadgets and StockSuperpowers that seem like magic but are actually science. The people fight with spears and swords and the gods use tablets.
* ''Literature/TheYoungAncients'' begins as a stock fantasy setting, before learning it's Earth thousands of years AfterTheEnd. The [[PowersAsPrograms magic]] also functions on a TechnoBabble explanation. By book nine of the Magitek industrial revolution, there's Magitek spaceships and a moon colony.
* A DownplayedTrope example occurs in SpaceOpera series ''Literature/LucifersStar'' by Creator/CTPhipps where people duel with swords, fight with shields, and have nobles. They also possess dragons and unicorns for pets. This is all due to SufficientlyAdvanced science, though with fantasy worlds being a popular archetype to terraform your colony around.
* ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'' mixes spaceships, sentient AI and FTL travel with living shadows, possession and calendar-based RealityWarping.
* ''Literature/TerraIgnota'' seems like a pure Science Fiction series on the face of it, but the fact that Bridger can work miracles such as bringing toys to life and possibly even resurrecting the dead, which nobody can explain with science, edges it just that tiny bit into Fantasy territory. Due to sufficiently advanced science, there are also pet unicorns and all kinds of other fantastic beasts.
* ''Literature/{{Feral}}'' runs on this. While magic does exist, 'wizard' may well be the same as 'scientist', with use of scientific thought and processes throughout the story. The story takes place after it's worlds creation of the printing press, and it's stated multiple times that its creation is more important than anything other device. Char, the main character, uses science and magic to create armor and weapons, including a blunderbuss whose gunpowder is lit by a fire rune.
* ''The Psalms of Isaak'' has a sci-fi backstory, being set on [[spoiler: a LostColony of]] Earth AfterTheEnd, with the present, roughly-renaissance-esque society existing in the ruins of the much more high-tech society that preceded it. Relics from said society include things like robots... and BloodMagic, with people in-universe often having a hard time determining where science ends and sorcery begins [[spoiler: with the abilities of the distant precursor Younger Gods being explicitly described as technological, but so far advanced they might as well be magic even to a modern reader, much less the characters in-story]]. Despite its sci-fi trappings, the series largely plays out as HighFantasy; later books [[DoingInTheWizard do in several wizards]] but also [[GoingCosmic double down on the mystical and philosophical thematic elements]].
* Creator/FritzLeiber's short story "Gonna Roll the Bones" (which scooped up the Hugo ''and'' Nebula for that year) is a classic example of the form, starring a martian miner matching wits against a casino boss who may or may not be TheDevil himself. Creator/HarlanEllison's glowing review of it notes, "it singlehandedly explains why lines of demarcation between fantasy and science fiction can seldom be drawn."

to:

* In Creator/RogerZelazny liked to challenge the novella ''Literature/ATasteOfHoney'', fantasy versions of AncientRome and AncientAfrica are combined with interstellar travel, so-called gods using sci-fi gadgets and StockSuperpowers that seem like magic but are actually science. The people fight with spears and swords and the gods use tablets.
* ''Literature/TheYoungAncients'' begins as a stock fantasy setting, before learning it's Earth thousands of years AfterTheEnd. The [[PowersAsPrograms magic]] also functions on a TechnoBabble explanation. By book nine of the Magitek industrial revolution, there's Magitek spaceships and a moon colony.
* A DownplayedTrope example occurs in SpaceOpera series ''Literature/LucifersStar'' by Creator/CTPhipps where people duel with swords, fight with shields, and have nobles. They also possess dragons and unicorns for pets. This is all due to SufficientlyAdvanced science, though with fantasy worlds being a popular archetype to terraform your colony around.
* ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'' mixes spaceships, sentient AI and FTL travel with living shadows, possession and calendar-based RealityWarping.
* ''Literature/TerraIgnota'' seems like a pure
boundaries between Science Fiction series on the face of it, but the fact that Bridger can work miracles such as bringing toys to life and possibly even resurrecting the dead, which nobody can explain with science, edges it just that tiny bit into Fantasy territory. Due to sufficiently advanced science, there are also pet unicorns Fantasy, and all kinds was known for blending in elements from Mythology:
** ''Literature/CreaturesOfLightAndDarkness'', often considered a companion novel to ''Lord
of other fantastic beasts.
* ''Literature/{{Feral}}'' runs on this. While magic does exist, 'wizard' may well be the same as 'scientist', with use
Light'', featured ''actual'' Egyptian Gods in a StandardSciFiSetting.
** ''Eye
of scientific thought and processes throughout the story. The story Cat'' had Native American Gods in a far-future setting.
** ''Jack of Shadows''
takes place after it's worlds creation of the printing press, on a planet which is half-magic (dark side), and it's stated multiple times that its creation is more important than anything other device. Char, the main character, uses science and magic to create armor and weapons, including a blunderbuss whose gunpowder is lit by a fire rune.
* ''The Psalms of Isaak'' has a sci-fi backstory, being set on [[spoiler: a LostColony of]] Earth AfterTheEnd, with the present, roughly-renaissance-esque society existing in the ruins of the much more high-tech society that preceded it. Relics from said society include things like robots... and BloodMagic, with people in-universe often having a hard time determining where science ends and sorcery begins [[spoiler: with the abilities of the distant precursor Younger Gods being explicitly described as technological, but so far advanced they might as well be magic even to a modern reader, much less the characters in-story]]. Despite its sci-fi trappings, the series largely plays out as HighFantasy; later books [[DoingInTheWizard do in several wizards]] but also [[GoingCosmic double down on the mystical and philosophical thematic elements]].
* Creator/FritzLeiber's short story "Gonna Roll the Bones" (which scooped up the Hugo ''and'' Nebula for that year) is a classic example of the form, starring a martian miner matching wits against a casino boss who may or may not be TheDevil himself. Creator/HarlanEllison's glowing review of it notes, "it singlehandedly explains why lines of demarcation
half technological (sunlit side). The titular antihero moves effortlessly between fantasy and both.
** ''Literature/LordOfLight'' featured apparent Hindu Gods--actually humans with mutant powers--on a far-future colony world.
** ''Literature/{{Roadmarks}}'' mixes
science fiction can seldom be drawn."tropes like robots and cyborgs with fantasy tropes like dragons and mystical powers in a setting where characters casually travel the length and breadth of human history. (Reader's choice which side the time travel falls on.)



* ''Series/DoctorWho'': A very clear-cut television example of this. Oh, where to begin... The original series was supposed to be firmly grounded in observable reality -- the Doctor himself identified as a scientist on a number of different occasions, because the series was originally intended to be an EdutainmentShow -- but then the more zany science fiction elements took over. By now, it uses elements from all over SpeculativeFiction, from {{eldritch horror}}s to Venetian [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] to [[{{Cyborg}} Cybermen]]. (Though this gets subverted, as many of the apparent monsters [[DoingInTheWizard commonly turn out to be just unusual aliens instead]].) And it's all brought together by a {{Time Travel}}ing TARDIS [[RuleOfFunny which looks like an antique police box on the outside]] and apparently goes where and when it is needed. The Eleventh Doctor's era was even explicitly stylised as "a dark fairytale", mixing {{space opera}} worthy elements with a childhood-like imagination and fantasy ethos.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': A very clear-cut television example of this. Oh, where to begin... The original series was supposed to be firmly grounded in observable reality -- the Doctor himself identified as a scientist on a number of different occasions, because the series was originally intended to be an EdutainmentShow -- but then the more zany science fiction elements took over. By now, it uses elements from all over SpeculativeFiction, from {{eldritch horror}}s to Venetian [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] to [[{{Cyborg}} Cybermen]]. (Though this gets subverted, as many of the apparent monsters [[DoingInTheWizard commonly turn out to be just unusual aliens instead]].) And it's all brought together by a {{Time Travel}}ing Travel}}ling TARDIS [[RuleOfFunny which looks like an antique police box on the outside]] and apparently goes where and when it is needed. The Eleventh Doctor's era was even explicitly stylised as "a dark fairytale", mixing {{space opera}} worthy elements with a childhood-like imagination and fantasy ethos.



* ''Series/WizardsVsAliens'' has a perfect balance of both science fiction and high fantasy elements. The creators ''Creator/RussellTDavies'' and ''Creator/PhilFord'' had originally worked on ''Series/DoctorWho'' in which there were often fantasy creatures, but they were always rationalized into alien beings. The idea for Wizards vs. Aliens came when it occured to them they didn't have to merge one genre into the other, they could have both existing in the same universe!

to:

* ''Series/WizardsVsAliens'' has a perfect balance of both science fiction and high fantasy elements. The creators ''Creator/RussellTDavies'' creators, Creator/RussellTDavies and ''Creator/PhilFord'' Creator/PhilFord, had originally worked on ''Series/DoctorWho'' ''Series/DoctorWho'', in which there were are often fantasy creatures, but they were always rationalized into alien beings. The idea for Wizards ''Wizards vs. Aliens Aliens'' came when it occured to them they didn't have to merge one genre into the other, they could have both existing in the same universe!



** John Blanche, the artistic madman who defined the dark gothic aesthetic of both Warhammer games, describes the setting in the Spetember White Dwarf magazine (the game's 30'th anniversary special) thus:
--> "Warhammer 40,000 is, to me, a pure [English] view of medievalism in space. It's full of fear, superstition, conflict and servitude and that's what we aim to show in the artwork."

to:

** John Blanche, the artistic madman who defined the dark gothic aesthetic of both Warhammer games, describes the setting in the Spetember September White Dwarf magazine (the game's 30'th 30th anniversary special) thus:
--> "Warhammer --->"Warhammer 40,000 is, to me, a pure [English] view of medievalism in space. It's full of fear, superstition, conflict and servitude and that's what we aim to show in the artwork."



* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' the Crystal Gems are [[TheAgeless ageless]] magical beings that defend humanity, but they're also aliens that have had advanced technology for thousands of years and their species' BizarreAlienReproduction makes them somewhat like robots.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' the ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': The Crystal Gems are [[TheAgeless ageless]] magical beings that defend humanity, but they're also aliens that have had advanced technology for thousands of years and their species' BizarreAlienReproduction makes them somewhat like robots.





* In the ''VideoGame/TheLongestJourney'' series, magic and technology once coexisted. Past misues of the two brought the PowersThatBe to separate the two into Stark (technology, "our" world) and Arcadia (magic/medieval world). Attempts to alter this balance are what drives the plot.

to:

* In the ''VideoGame/TheLongestJourney'' series, ''VideoGame/TheLongestJourneySaga'', magic and technology once coexisted. Past misues of the two brought the PowersThatBe to separate the two into Stark (technology, "our" world) and Arcadia (magic/medieval world). Attempts to alter this balance are what drives the plot. The later games also throw in some SteamPunk.

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