Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / RubberBandAI

Go To



* Perhaps the most noticeable example is the ''VideoGame/MaddenNFL'' games, which are often accused of featuring an "AI catch-up mode", in which opposing teams inexplicably become drastically more potent in the final minutes of a close game, often to the point where preventing them from completing long bombs and scoring touchdowns seems like an impossible task (sometimes called "Robo QB"). Some Madden players, however, dispute the existence of Rubber Band A.I. in the game, arguing that this is more likely the perception of players who are unable to adjust to the AI's late-game all-out offensive strategy. It is also possible that the difficulty level may have something to do with it.
** In most cases, the AI level of rubberbanding is directly related to the difficulty level, particularly in EA Sports games. On the easiest difficulty level, the AI doesn't rubberband at all: the same tactics, the same plays, over and over. As difficulty level goes up, so does the degree of rubberbanding: on the highest difficulty level, as soon as the player reaches anything approaching a lead, the AI responds aggressively to shut down any hope of winning...much like what sports teams do in real life. The rubberbanding does ''not'' work in the opposite direction, however. The AI just goes back to the normal difficulty.
** ''NBA 2k'' and ''NBA Live'' actually have this as a feature, Clutch Factor and CPU Assistance respectively. It does work both ways, though. Doesn't make it any less irritating to see Kobe Bryant missing clutch layup after clutch layup.
** Truth in real life for that last one after game 7 of the 2010 NBA finals, where Kobe shot a horrible 6-for-24 in the biggest game of his career.

to:

* Perhaps As mentioned in the most noticeable example is the trope description, ''VideoGame/MaddenNFL'' games, which are is one of the more shining examples in modern gaming. Creator/BillSimmons of ESPN coined the term "No F***ing Way game" for the times when the computer makes an unbelievable MiracleRally while your own players become inept clods. It is often accused of featuring an "AI catch-up mode", in which opposing teams inexplicably become drastically more potent in the final minutes of a close game, often to the point where preventing them from completing long bombs and scoring touchdowns seems like an impossible task (sometimes called "Robo QB"). Some Madden players, however, dispute QB"), even when the existence of Rubber Band A.I. AI controlled team showed absolutely nothing in the game, arguing earlier portions of the game to indicate that this is more likely the perception they were capable of players who are unable to adjust to the AI's late-game all-out offensive strategy. It is also possible that the difficulty level may have something to do with it.
**
this. In most cases, the AI level of rubberbanding is directly related to the difficulty level, particularly in EA Sports games.level. On the easiest difficulty level, the AI doesn't rubberband at all: the same tactics, the same plays, over and over. As difficulty level goes up, so does the degree of rubberbanding: on the highest difficulty level, as soon as the player reaches anything approaching a lead, the AI responds aggressively to shut down any hope of winning...much like - players for the human-controlled team become utterly inept, well below what sports teams do in real life. The their rating would justify, while players for the computer controlled team become unstoppable juggernauts far beyond what their ratings would justify. Furthermore, the rubberbanding does ''not'' work in the opposite direction, however. The AI just goes back to the normal difficulty.
** * ''NBA 2k'' and ''NBA Live'' actually have this as a feature, Clutch Factor and CPU Assistance respectively. It does work both ways, though. Doesn't make it any less irritating to see Kobe Bryant missing clutch layup after clutch layup.
** Truth
layup. (Truth in real life for that last one after game 7 of the 2010 NBA finals, where Kobe shot a horrible 6-for-24 in the biggest game of his career.)


* ''Top Gear'' (or ''Top Racer'' in Japan) has this with your partner, if you have the red car (the fastest and oil-waster in the game) and your white car (the most slower but oil-economic car) partner goes way behind, the partner AI can go even to 240 km/h, when it's max speed is 210 km/h, without boosting!, but if the opposite applies, the AI goes to 150 km/h until you are closer. The non-partner AI in first place do the opposite, if you don't reach the first place near the last lap, they are too far or even more than a lap over you (on extreme cases, taking a lap over the second place), the on-screen speed? 190-195 km/h.

to:

* ''Top Gear'' (or ''Top Racer'' in Japan) has this with your partner, partner: if you have the red car (the fastest and oil-waster most oil-wasting in the game) and your white car (the slowest but most slower but oil-economic efficient car) partner goes way behind, the partner AI can go even to 240 km/h, when it's max speed is 210 km/h, without boosting!, but boosting! But if the opposite applies, the AI goes slows down to 150 km/h until you are closer. The non-partner AI in first place do the opposite, opposite: if you don't reach the first place near the last lap, they are too far or even more than a lap over you (on (in extreme cases, taking a lap over the second place), the on-screen speed? 190-195 km/h.

Added DiffLines:

** [[AndNowForSomethingCompletelyDifferent Depending on what game you play]], certain games like the classic-era games and ''Underground''-era games, and especially ''Hot Pursuit'' games have opponent cars catching you up in a sudden (even [[HotPursuit fleets of police cars]]), while simulation-based games like ''[=ProStreet=]'' and ''Shift'' games can have you sandwiched between bumping opponents, depending on the track.


* The arcade game ''Pigskin: 621 A.D.'' (released as ''Jerry Glanville's Pigskin Footbrawl'' on the Sega Genesis) is a game vaguely reminiscent of rugby and American football, though set in the Middle Ages. You could punch other players out, or get into a brawl (read: two characters collide and [[BigBallOfViolence turn into a dust cloud]]) on the field. If one side is losing badly, the crowd starts chanting, "Send in the troll!" At which point a big green troll enters the field for the losing side. He's immune to the game's weapons and much more difficult to knock down. If the fortunes reverse and the losing team starts winning, a troll can come in for the ''opposite'' side as well, to even things up. Then of course, if one team is truly getting a spanking? Simple, TROLL BOWL!!! Every player is swapped out for invincible, immortal Trolls!

to:

* The arcade game ''Pigskin: 621 A.D.'' (released as ''Jerry Glanville's Pigskin Footbrawl'' on the Sega Genesis) is a game vaguely reminiscent of rugby and American football, though set in the Middle Ages. You could punch other players out, or get into a brawl (read: two characters collide and [[BigBallOfViolence turn into a dust cloud]]) on the field. If one side is losing badly, the crowd starts chanting, "Send in the troll!" At which point a big green troll enters the field for the losing side. He's immune to the game's weapons and much more difficult to knock down. If the fortunes reverse and the losing team starts winning, a troll can come in for the ''opposite'' side as well, to even things up. Then of course, if one team is truly getting a spanking? Simple, TROLL BOWL!!! Every player is swapped out for invincible, immortal Trolls!Trolls! It does bear mentioning this applies in Player vs. Player too, in which case it's probably more of a ComebackMechanic.

Added DiffLines:

** ''Underground 2'' actually allows you to turn "Catch-Up" off, letting you see just how effective it is. You can play a race with "Catch-Up" enabled and win by only a few seconds, then turn it off, play the same race a second time, and win by ''minutes''.


* ''[[VideoGame/SiN SiN Episodes]]'' was released with a much-touted dynamic difficulty system -- kill the enemies too quickly and they'd send more next time, get too many headshots and the next group will wear helmets, etc. Unfortunately, encounters that were ''supposed'' to be easier or harder were counted in this, resulting in situations that a hard encounter would be made virtually impossible due to how quickly you dispatched an easy one.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/SiN SiN Episodes]]'' was released with a much-touted dynamic difficulty DynamicDifficulty system -- kill the enemies too quickly and they'd send more next time, get too many headshots and the next group will wear helmets, etc. Unfortunately, encounters that were ''supposed'' to be easier or harder were counted in this, resulting in situations that a hard encounter would be made virtually impossible due to how quickly you dispatched an easy one. That's not getting into a bug where a pair of triggers for the system, which partly worked based on how short an interval there was between the player hitting them, were placed in such a way that they didn't disappear after being triggered - if you unknowingly lingered around the areas that had them, you could potentially trigger them multiple times per second, causing later encounters to become downright hellish in their impossibility.



** Though unlike most other examples on this page, we are talking about a match fixed in a small arena, specifically [[http://unreal.wikia.com/wiki/DM-HyperBlast DM-HyperBlast]], a small spaceship midway through the cosmos. Which translates to, low gravity, little footing, and of course a BottomlessPit ''[[UpToEleven wrapping the whole stage, even upwards!]]'' Also, there's an ASMD Shock Rifle laying on top of the ship, a gun specialized in pushing people to their deaths should they be close enough to an environmental hazard. Do the math, and see what was supposed to be the hardest fight in the whole game suddenly becoming a much-needed BreatherLevel.

to:

** Though unlike most other examples on this page, we are talking about a match fixed in a small arena, specifically [[http://unreal.wikia.com/wiki/DM-HyperBlast DM-HyperBlast]], a small spaceship midway through the cosmos. Which translates to, to low gravity, little footing, and of course a BottomlessPit ''[[UpToEleven wrapping the whole stage, even upwards!]]'' Also, there's an ASMD Shock Rifle laying on top of the ship, a gun specialized in pushing people to their deaths should they be close enough to an environmental hazard. Do the math, and see what was supposed to be the hardest fight in the whole game suddenly becoming a much-needed BreatherLevel.



** This actually spawned the meme of Karma Charger, which came from the habit of chargers conveniently spawning and punting a player halfway across the map if they leave their group. While any infected can do this, Chargers are the hardest of them to kill, and cannot be pushed off other survivors and must be killed.
** Karma Charger actually appears whenever the team is making a dickish move, at least as per the meme. One of the most obvious ones is teamkilling.

to:

** This actually spawned the meme of the Karma Charger, which came from the habit of chargers Chargers conveniently spawning and punting a player halfway across the map if whenever they leave their group. do anything construed as less-than-perfect teamwork (the meme started in regards to team-killing, though Karma Chargers seem to take just as dim a view on anything from that to [[AllCrimesAreEqual hoarding pills when a teammate is in slightly worse health]]). While any infected can do this, Chargers are the hardest of them to kill, and cannot be pushed shoved off other survivors and must be killed.
** Karma Charger actually appears whenever the team is making a dickish move, at least as per the meme. One of the most obvious ones is teamkilling.



* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII,'' Bizarro∙ and Safer∙Sephiroth's stats are based on a ton of variables, one of which is your party members' levels. Having all of your characters at level 99 makes Safer one of the strongest final bosses in the series, only surpassed by [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII Orphan]]. Of course, by that point, you probably have [[GameBreaker Knights of the Round]]...
** [[DoWellButNotPerfect Casting Knights of the Round]] on the earlier fight against Jenova∙SYNTHESIS [[FromBadToWorse adds 60000 HP to Bizzaro and 80000 HP to Safer]]. Granted, at high level this is significantly less health than you can take off with [[GameBreaker one casting of it]].
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''. However, since the ability to draw magic and junction it to your stats was technically separate from the {{Character Level}}s gained from actual battling, it was very easy to [[GameBreaker unbalance]] the game with some ingenuity.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII,'' Bizarro∙ and Safer∙Sephiroth's stats are based on a ton of variables, one of which is your party members' levels. Having all of your characters at level 99 makes Safer one of the strongest final bosses in the series, only surpassed by [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII Orphan]]. Of course, by that point, you probably have [[GameBreaker Knights of the Round]]...
Round]].
** [[DoWellButNotPerfect Casting Knights of the Round]] on the earlier fight against Jenova∙SYNTHESIS [[FromBadToWorse adds 60000 HP to Bizzaro and 80000 HP to Safer]]. Granted, at high level this is significantly less health than you can take off with [[GameBreaker one casting of it]].
it.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII''. However, since the ability to draw magic and junction it to your stats was technically separate from the {{Character Level}}s gained from actual battling, it was very easy to [[GameBreaker unbalance]] unbalance the game with some ingenuity.

Added DiffLines:

** At least at the high school level, it's fairly common for the coach of a team which is far ahead to bench the first string entirely. This accomplishes several things: 1. it allows the first string players to rest and recuperate for the ''next'' game; 2. it gives second (third, fourth, etc.) string players a chance to play in a "big game" instead of just in scrimmages; 3. it helps avoid the appearance of poor sportsmanship in the form of "running up the score" against a weak opponent.

Added DiffLines:

** As a WideOpenSandbox type game, there's nothing stopping you from getting InfinityPlusOneSword items at very low levels (except not knowing where to go to do it). Because the designers knew there was at least a possibility that a level 1 character might be running around with legendary artifacts, quest rewards are scaled to the player's level at the time they're earned so they don't completely unbalance the game. This means a legendary sword whose name is spoken only in reverent whispers will, if you obtain it when you're level 3, be hopelessly outclassed by vendor trash drops you get from common mooks by the time you're level 15. One of the more popular mods for the game is one that re-calibrates quest rewards the PC has earned earned as the player levels up to keep them relevant throughout the game.


Wrong. Suddenly, the AI is twice as fast as you, knows what play you're going to run, and shuts down your offense, forcing you to punt - or, worse, your running back with a high "Hands" rating fumbles the ball, or an AI defensive back makes a miracle interception. On their drive, the AI marches down-field with no difficulty by completing several consecutive bombs, scoring an easy touchdown. Worse still, your clutch plays whether you control the offense or defense will be negated by penalties, giving the AI a [[JustForPun sporting chance]]. Rinse and repeat, and before you know it you've lost what you thought was a safe lead. The video game has just experienced a MiracleRally.

to:

Wrong. Suddenly, the AI [[VideoGameAI AI]] is twice as fast as you, knows what play you're going to run, and shuts down your offense, forcing you to punt - or, worse, your running back with a high "Hands" rating fumbles the ball, or an AI defensive back makes a miracle interception. On their drive, the AI marches down-field with no difficulty by completing several consecutive bombs, scoring an easy touchdown. Worse still, your clutch plays whether you control the offense or defense will be negated by penalties, giving the AI a [[JustForPun sporting chance]]. Rinse and repeat, and before you know it you've lost what you thought was a safe lead. The video game has just experienced a MiracleRally.


Why does this happen? The further you stretch a rubber band, the harder it pulls. It's the same idea here. Basically, the better you are doing at a game, the harder the game gets in order to continue to present a challenge. This isn't just the idea of making the game harder and harder as you progress farther and farther, this means that the level you're on ''right now'' will, for seemingly no reason, ramp up its difficulty if it thinks you're doing too well. This may, in some cases, be coupled with the computer [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard actually cheating]], rather than just getting better.

to:

Why does this happen? The further you stretch a rubber band, the harder it pulls. It's the same idea here. Basically, the better you are doing at a game, the harder the game gets in order to continue to present a challenge. This isn't just the idea of making the game harder and harder as you progress farther further and farther, further, this means that the level you're on ''right now'' will, for seemingly no reason, ramp up its difficulty if it thinks you're doing too well. This may, in some cases, be coupled with the computer [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard actually cheating]], rather than just getting better.


** Interestingly enough, in the original version for SNES, CPU opponents always finish in the order they start the race, plus or minus one depending on how the player does (so if, say, Bowser starts the race in the first position, he will remain there until you finish a race ahead of him, at which point he will always finish at whatever position he next starts unless he manages to pull out ahead of you again). This can be used to game the AI in amusing ways, especially in order to neuter the [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating ones]] that get weapons and powerups a human racer doesn't have access to.
** And if you're good at hitting shortcuts, expect the computer to be able to suddenly hit a top speed well beyond what any human could do. The most blatant instance is Rainbow Road in ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'', which has a shortcut that can literally skip 40% of the course (and it is, to this date, the longest course in the series' history). Even if you hit said shortcut on all three laps, the computer is still able to catch you on the last lap.
*** By turning on the map-view in ''64'' it's possible to watch opponents suddenly accelerate to unrealistic speed when they are far behind or ahead. Allow a single CPU driver to get too far ahead in 150cc and they'll reach the finish line in times no human player, even drifting experts, can finish in.

to:

** Interestingly enough, in the original version for SNES, In ''Videogame/SuperMarioKart'', CPU opponents always finish in the order they start the race, plus or minus one depending on how the player does (so if, say, Bowser starts the race in the first position, he will remain there until you finish a race ahead of him, at which point he will always finish at whatever position he next starts unless he manages to pull out ahead of you again). This can be used to game the AI in amusing ways, especially in order to neuter the [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating ones]] that get weapons and powerups a human racer doesn't have access to.
** And if you're good at hitting shortcuts, expect the computer to be able to suddenly hit a top speed well beyond what any human could do. The most blatant instance is Rainbow Road in ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'', which has a shortcut that can literally skip 40% of the course (and it is, to this date, the longest course in the series' history). Even if you hit said shortcut on all three laps, laps and use perfectly timed drifting boosts throughout the rest of the course, the computer is still able to catch you on the last lap.
*** By turning on the map-view in ''64'' it's possible to watch opponents suddenly accelerate to unrealistic speed when they are far behind or ahead. Allow a single CPU driver to get too far ahead in 150cc or Extra and they'll reach the finish line in times no human player, even drifting experts, can finish in.in- especially in courses like Kalimari Desert and Bowser's Castle.

Added DiffLines:

** In Tails's levels, Sonic will ''always'' rubberband quite hard to catch up to you if you manage to get far ahead of him. The Radical Highway level has you racing against Eggman instead and his AI seems to completely lack any form of rubberbanding. You can easily skip huge chunks of the level and reach the end in record time while Eggman hasn't even gone through half the level yet.

Added DiffLines:

** Though unlike most other examples on this page, we are talking about a match fixed in a small arena, specifically [[http://unreal.wikia.com/wiki/DM-HyperBlast DM-HyperBlast]], a small spaceship midway through the cosmos. Which translates to, low gravity, little footing, and of course a BottomlessPit ''[[UpToEleven wrapping the whole stage, even upwards!]]'' Also, there's an ASMD Shock Rifle laying on top of the ship, a gun specialized in pushing people to their deaths should they be close enough to an environmental hazard. Do the math, and see what was supposed to be the hardest fight in the whole game suddenly becoming a much-needed BreatherLevel.


* The first ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' proudly touted this as one of its features, with arguably less-than-optimal results. Even on the "easy" difficulty setting it ramped up the durability, accuracy and reflexes of the enemies until you died at least once per level.
-->''"Why did they even bother giving you difficulty options? As far as I could tell your options were "insane / insane / impossible / impossible with a time limit."'' -- curst, Quarter to Three forums

to:

* The first ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' proudly touted this as one of its features, with arguably less-than-optimal results. Even on the "easy" difficulty setting it ramped up the durability, accuracy and reflexes of the enemies until you died at least once per level.
-->''"Why
level. To quote [[https://forum.quartertothree.com/t/max-payne-2-announced/3556/15 a user from]] the Quarter to Three forums:
-->''Why
did they even bother giving you difficulty options? As far as I could tell your options were "insane / insane / insane / impossible / impossible with a time limit."'' -- curst, Quarter to Three forums"''


->''This era also witnesses the dawning of the "No Bleeping Way Game," where you are playing out a "season" against the computer and doing a little too well, so the computer gets ticked and make sure there is no bleeping way you are winning the next game -- dropped passes, improbable kick returns, random fumbles and so on. God, I hate the No Bleeping Way Game.''

to:

->''This era also witnesses the dawning of the "No Bleeping Way Game," where you are playing out a "season" against the computer and doing a little too ''too'' well, so the computer gets ticked and make sure there is no ''no bleeping way way'' you are winning the next game -- dropped passes, improbable kick returns, random fumbles and so on. God, I hate the No Bleeping Way Game.''



Also seen in a few {{RPG}}s, where enemies are adjusted according to your character's levels, which can make any non-levelable stuff (like items) useless pretty quick. This is sometimes referred to as "punishing you for your experience." See EmptyLevels and LevelScaling,

to:

Also seen in a few {{RPG}}s, where enemies are adjusted according to your character's levels, which can make any non-levelable stuff (like items) useless pretty quick. This is sometimes referred to as "punishing you for your experience." See LevelScaling and especially EmptyLevels and LevelScaling,
for examples of this sort of punishment.



** Interestingly enough, in the original version for SNES, CPU opponents always finish in the order they start the race (so if, say, Bowser starts the race in the first position, he will remain there until someone finishes a race ahead of him, at which point he will always finish at whatever position he next starts). This can be used to game the AI in amusing ways, especially in order to neuter the [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating ones]] that get weapons and powerups a human racer doesn't have access to.
** And if you're good at hitting shortcuts, expect the computer to be able to suddenly hit a top speed well beyond what any human could do. The most blatant instance is Rainbow Road in ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'', which has a shortcut that can literally skip 40% of the course (which is, to this date, the longest course in the game series's history). Even if you hit said shortcut on all three laps, the computer is still able to catch you on the last lap.
*** By turning on the map-view in Mario Kart 64 it's possible to watch opponents suddenly accelerate to unrealistic speed when they are far behind or ahead. Allow a single CPU driver to get too far ahead in 150cc and they'll reach the finish line in times no human player, even drifting experts, can finish in.
*** Similar to the example above for Rainbow Road, Maka Wuhu in ''Mario Kart 7'' has an exploitable glitch that lets you skip at least half the track. If you do this while racing against the AI, they will magically catch up to you without fail. [[NoFairCheating Then again]] you ''were'' cheating...
** ''Mario Kart Wii'' takes the rubber-banding UpToEleven after the [[BlatantLies fairly cheating-free DS game]]. The computer racers change their speed depending on your position in the race, and they also get much better items than you if you're ahead. This is all par for the series, though...until you realize that there are more drivers in Wii--12 instead of 8. The result is that driving too far ahead of the pack results in your getting bombarded with three or four items in a row, which requires impeccable coordination that only a computer could muster and adds at least five seconds to your lap time. At least there's always online play...but then you encounter the ''really good'' players, the ones who have beaten the computer at their own game and then some.

to:

** Interestingly enough, in the original version for SNES, CPU opponents always finish in the order they start the race race, plus or minus one depending on how the player does (so if, say, Bowser starts the race in the first position, he will remain there until someone finishes you finish a race ahead of him, at which point he will always finish at whatever position he next starts).starts unless he manages to pull out ahead of you again). This can be used to game the AI in amusing ways, especially in order to neuter the [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating ones]] that get weapons and powerups a human racer doesn't have access to.
** And if you're good at hitting shortcuts, expect the computer to be able to suddenly hit a top speed well beyond what any human could do. The most blatant instance is Rainbow Road in ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'', which has a shortcut that can literally skip 40% of the course (which (and it is, to this date, the longest course in the game series's series' history). Even if you hit said shortcut on all three laps, the computer is still able to catch you on the last lap.
*** By turning on the map-view in Mario Kart 64 ''64'' it's possible to watch opponents suddenly accelerate to unrealistic speed when they are far behind or ahead. Allow a single CPU driver to get too far ahead in 150cc and they'll reach the finish line in times no human player, even drifting experts, can finish in.
*** Similar to the example above for Rainbow Road, Maka Wuhu in ''Mario Kart 7'' ''VideoGame/MarioKart7'' has an exploitable glitch that lets you skip at least half the track. If you do this while racing against the AI, they will magically catch up to you without fail. [[NoFairCheating Then again]] you ''were'' cheating...
** ''Mario Kart Wii'' ''VideoGame/MarioKartWii'' takes the rubber-banding UpToEleven after the [[BlatantLies fairly cheating-free DS game]]. cheating-free]] ''VideoGame/MarioKartDS''. The computer racers change their speed depending on your position in the race, and they also get much better items than you if you're ahead.ahead, far better than you would if you were in their position. This is all par for the series, though... until you realize that there are more drivers in Wii--12 Wii -- 12 instead of 8. The result is that driving too far ahead of the pack results in your getting bombarded with three or four items in a row, which requires impeccable coordination that only a computer could muster and adds at least five seconds to your lap time. At least there's always online play... but then you encounter the ''really good'' players, the ones who have beaten the computer at their own game and then some.



** ''Mario Kart 8'' takes things up a whole notch with the addition of [[BeyondTheImpossible 200cc]]. If you thought the Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong example above was bad, the AI on this game's 200cc difficulty setting '''ZOOM''' at unbelievable speeds to prevent you from winning. To be honest, however, [[NintendoHard even the AI has a hard time playing on this engine class]].

to:

** ''Mario Kart 8'' ''VideoGame/MarioKart8'' takes things up a whole notch with the addition of [[BeyondTheImpossible [[UpToEleven 200cc]]. If you thought the Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong example above was bad, the AI on this game's 200cc difficulty setting '''ZOOM''' at unbelievable speeds to prevent you from winning. To be honest, however, [[NintendoHard even the AI has a hard time playing on this engine class]].

Showing 15 edit(s) of 164

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report