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* ArabOilSheikh: So popular as the male lead that you can buy 'sheikh' omnibuses. Tends to be common among certain categories of the category novels.

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* ArabOilSheikh: So popular as the male lead that you can buy 'sheikh' omnibuses. Tends to be common among certain categories of the category novels. Of course, as a romantic figure, the Arab sheik or prince [[Literature/TheSheik goes way back]].



** Despite the sheikh novels mentioned above, less "genre" romances often have heroes who are just one exotic (from a US perspective) quarter: Native American, Japanese, Arab or the like, but very rarely are full members of non-European ethnicities in ancestry and upbringing.

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** Despite the sheikh novels mentioned above, less "genre" romances often have heroes who are just one exotic (from a US perspective) quarter: Native American, Japanese, Arab or the like, but very rarely are full members of non-European ethnicities in ancestry and upbringing. There are also lines of romance books featuring Afro-American couples as well as interracial relationships; also Native Americans, in contemporary settings as well as historical, some actually written by Native authors like Evangeline Parsons Yazzie.



* CostumePorn: If lady's outfits are described, they will be in detail.

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* CostumePorn: If lady's ladies' outfits are described, they will be in detail.detail. Sometimes gentlemen's, as well, following the precedent set by 19th-century romance author Creator/{{Ouida}}.


* ReformedRakes: If the hero is a bad boy, he'll be the ideal man (or at least the ReformedButNotTamed) by the end, thanks to the PowerOfLove.

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* ReformedRakes: If the hero is a bad boy, he'll be the ideal man (or at least the ReformedButNotTamed) by the end, thanks to the PowerOfLove. PowerOfLove.
* RejectedMarriageProposal


* CoitusEnsues: Some sex scenes in romance novels serve no plot purpose beyond fanservice, [[AvertedTrope though others]] do have an important role in the plot and the development of the leads' relationship.



* {{Hunk}}: The hero will often be depicted very buff, chiseled and manly, frequently showing this off with {{Shirtless Scene}}s. However, from around the 1990's onwards, {{Pretty Boy}}s became more in vogue, though hunks do still show up.



* PrettyBoy: If the hero's not a hunk, he'll probably be this; handsome in a delicate, youthful manner. Particularly in historical romance, there's a good chance he'll be a LonghairedPrettyBoy too.



* ReformedRakes

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* ReformedRakesReformedRakes: If the hero is a bad boy, he'll be the ideal man (or at least the ReformedButNotTamed) by the end, thanks to the PowerOfLove.



* RomanceCoverScene

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* RomanceCoverSceneRomanceCoverScene: Very common for novels published in the late 20th century, not quite so common anymore. Fabio is optional.



* RuleOfRomantic
* StarCrossedLovers

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* RuleOfRomantic
RuleOfRomantic: Frequently employed; it's kinda the whole point.
* StarCrossedLoversSexyDiscretionShot: Believe it or not, some romance novels actually skim over the sex (if sex is included at all).
* StarCrossedLovers: The universe seems to be conspiring to keep the leads apart, though it's unusual for them to not end up together anyway.



* UnexpectedVirgin

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* UnexpectedVirginUnexpectedVirgin: A character (often, though not always, the heroine) you wouldn't expect to be a virgin turns out to be. Tends not to come up until they're actually about to do/have done the deed ("Why didn't you tell me you were a virgin?").



* VirginShaming

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* VirginShamingVirginShaming: Being a virgin is seen as a source of mockery.


* DamselOutOfDistress: In some cases, the heroine will actually try to get herself out of trouble; it varies as to whether she's successful.
* DistressedDamsel: The heroine often gets into some sort of trouble so the hero can [[RescueRomance rescue her]].
* DistressedDude: In an inverse to the above, the hero may have to be saved by the heroine; it sometimes overlaps with RescueReversal. This is a great opportunity for the hero to feel gratitude to the heroine, admiration for her pluckiness and general growing affection for her, for the heroine to treat any injuries he may have sustained, the heroine to realize how much she cares for him after she nearly lost him, and so forth.



* FirstLove



* FauxActionGirl: Less common nowadays, but some works tend to have heroines who are either blatantly lying or in deep denial when they insist they can "take care of themselves", or suddenly become incompetent and helpless whenever the plot needs the hero to intervene.
* FirstLove: The main couple will often be this to each other; if they had other relationships prior to this, it will often be stated they didn't truly love their exes.



* MillsAndBoonProse: Ironically despite the Mills and Boon category romances being the TropeNamer, most romance novels avert this trope in favor of less PurpleProse-like sex scenes.

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* MillsAndBoonProse: Ironically Ironically, despite the Mills and Boon category romances being the TropeNamer, most romance novels avert this trope in favor of less PurpleProse-like sex scenes.



* OneHourWorkWeek

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* OneHourWorkWeekNotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization: The hero is very forceful with the heroine when it comes to intimacy, but she secretly wants to be with him anyway, so it isn't presented as problematic in-universe. More common in works published prior to the 1980's, due to shifting attitudes around women and sex (namely that it's now widely viewed as A-okay for a woman to initiate and/or actively seek out consensual sex); it occasionally creeps into more recent works, but is now viewed as being a lot more problematic due to the lack of consent and perceived romanticization of sexual assault.
* NotLikeOtherGirls: It's not uncommon for the hero to tell the heroine she's not like any other woman he's ever met, or to emphasize how 'different' she is.
* OneHourWorkWeek: The leads usually spend more time making googly eyes at each other than working, which doesn't seem to affect their job performance.



* RomanticizedAbuse: Definitely ''not'' universal (although it's a common misconception about the genre); however, there are some works where [[BastardBoyfriend the hero]] (or more rarely [[BastardGirlfriend the heroine]]) will treat their love interest rather poorly, yet their behavior is portrayed as romantic or glossed over. In some older works, it can be partly a result of ValuesDissonance.



* TooDumbToLive: Far too many of the heroines.
** Most common in romantic suspense genre as a way to have an otherwise intelligent heroine get captured by the villain so the hero can have a StormTheCastle rescue moment.

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* TooDumbToLive: Far too many of the heroines.
**
heroines. Most common in romantic suspense genre as a way to have an otherwise intelligent heroine get captured by the villain so the hero can have a StormTheCastle rescue moment.



* UnresolvedSexualTension

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* UnresolvedSexualTensionUnresolvedSexualTension: A prime source of drama for the first two thirds of the story. It'll definitely be resolved by the end, though ''when'' exactly it's resolved can vary.


* BeautifulAllAlong

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* BeautifulAllAlongBeautifulAllAlong: The heroine will often be described as plain (or [[IAmNotPretty think of herself as plain]]), then gets a make-over that reveals her as stunningly beautiful.



* TheIngenue

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* TheIngenueTheIngenue: Lots of heroines are portrayed as innocent and kindhearted, but also sheltered and unworldly with a tendency to get into danger (so the hero can swoop in and save her). She'll often be a virgin or at least very sexually inexperienced as well; dollars to doughnuts she won't be by the end.


* ButNotTooForeign: Despite the sheikh novels mentioned above, less "genre" romances often have heroes who are just one exotic (from a US perspective) quarter: Native American, Japanese, Arab or the like, but very rarely are full members of non-European ethnicities in ancestry and upbringing.

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* ButNotTooForeign: ButNotTooForeign:
**
Despite the sheikh novels mentioned above, less "genre" romances often have heroes who are just one exotic (from a US perspective) quarter: Native American, Japanese, Arab or the like, but very rarely are full members of non-European ethnicities in ancestry and upbringing.



* HappilyEverAfter: Explicitly described by many readers and writers as an essential mark of the genre, distinguishing it from other love stories. Abbreviated HEA.

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* HappilyEverAfter: HappilyEverAfter:
**
Explicitly described by many readers and writers as an essential mark of the genre, distinguishing it from other love stories. Abbreviated HEA.



* PublicMediumIgnorance: Romance novels are full of PurpleProse, [[CoitusEnsues gratuitous sex]] and are basically thinly veiled porn for women, or "mommy porn". [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder Right?]]

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* PublicMediumIgnorance: PublicMediumIgnorance:
**
Romance novels are full of PurpleProse, [[CoitusEnsues gratuitous sex]] and are basically thinly veiled porn for women, or "mommy porn". [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder Right?]]


* AntiHero: The types vary, but romance novel leads can tend towards bad boys (ready to be reformed) instead of a clean cut, straitlaced fellow.

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* AntiHero: The types vary, but romance novel leads can tend towards bad boys (ready to be reformed) instead of a clean cut, clean-cut, straitlaced fellow.



* LovableRogue: The male lead character is simultaneously desirable, and off-putting or threatening.

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* LovableRogue: The male lead character is simultaneously desirable, desirable and off-putting or threatening.



* MagicalNanny: Often in the Magical Stepmother form, though in that case the marriage is not for real.

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* MagicalNanny: Often in the Magical Stepmother form, though in that case case, the marriage is not for real.



** Most the common in romantic suspense genre as a way to have an otherwise intelligent heroine get captured by the villain so the hero can have a StormTheCastle rescue moment.
* TrueLoveIsAKink: When romantic attraction and carnal attraction are one in the same.
* TheyDo: Essential for the HappilyEverAfter

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** Most the common in romantic suspense genre as a way to have an otherwise intelligent heroine get captured by the villain so the hero can have a StormTheCastle rescue moment.
* TrueLoveIsAKink: When romantic attraction and carnal attraction are one in and the same.
* TheyDo: Essential for the HappilyEverAfterHappilyEverAfter.


* LovableRogue: the male lead character is simultaneously desirable, and off-putting or threatening.

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* LovableRogue: the The male lead character is simultaneously desirable, and off-putting or threatening.

Added DiffLines:

* TrueLoveIsAKink: When romantic attraction and carnal attraction are one in the same.


* [[DoesNotLikeMen Does Not Like Women]]: The special romance-novel version of HeManWomanHater, in which the male hero only hates women because of the actions of a ''bad'' woman, and will be cured in the end by the ''good'' heroine.


Added DiffLines:

* HeManWomanHater: In which the male hero only hates women because of the actions of a ''bad'' woman, and will be cured in the end by the ''good'' heroine.


!!Tropes:

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!!Tropes:'''Tropes:'''


* RomanticFakeRealTurn

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* RomanticFakeRealTurnRomanticFakeRealTurn: One person pretends to love another, or two pretend to love each other, then they fall in love for real.

Added DiffLines:

* RomanticFakeRealTurn


* FanNickname: Many abbreviations for common term among fans, including:

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* FanNickname: Many abbreviations for common term terms among fans, including:


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_game_by_brenda_joyce.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:A WalkingShirtlessScene poses with [[HeroesWantRedheads his redhead]] lady and her barely hanging on [[PimpedOutDress grand dress]].]]



* CostumePorn: If lady's outfits are described, they will be in detail.



* SturgeonsLaw: The absolute volume of romance novels produced including both category and single title today, and considering past efforts, means that most readers can go years without reading something they consider belonging to the bottom 90%. This bottom 90% does contribute to [[PopculturalOsmosis society's opinion]] on the genre, however.

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