Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / RoboSpeak

Go To



* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' games:

to:

* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' games:''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'':


* In ''Literature/SonicTheHedgehogAndTheSiliconWarriors'', our hero is trying to taunt a computer (ItMakesSenseInContext) and has little success, until he unleashes an epic stream of invective in the spirit of this trope:

to:

* In ''Literature/SonicTheHedgehogAndTheSiliconWarriors'', our hero is trying to taunt a computer (ItMakesSenseInContext) and has little success, until he unleashes an epic stream of invective in the spirit of this trope:



** "Give me the bird."
** E-123 Omega from ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'', on the other hand, gets an angry monotone, but better lines ("WORTHLESS CONSUMER MODELS!"). Interestingly, his voiced renditions of stock answers like "Affirmative.", "Negative." or "Illogical, does not compute!" fit his serious but also very angry character quite well.
** In ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'', he sounds more robotic, to a fault.

to:

** "Give me the bird."
** E-123 Omega from ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'', on the other hand, gets an angry monotone, but better lines ("WORTHLESS CONSUMER MODELS!"). Interestingly, his voiced renditions of stock answers like "Affirmative.", "Negative." or "Illogical, does not compute!" fit his serious but also very angry character quite well.
**
well. In ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'', he sounds more robotic, to a fault.


** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices. This is justified, because they were meant to better endear themselves to their human masters, and also because many of these models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war, with Codsworth being a notable example. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.

to:

** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices. This is justified, because they were meant to better endear themselves to their human masters, and also because many of these models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war, with Codsworth being a notable example. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.


** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices. This is justified, because they were meant to better endear themselves to their human masters, and also because many of these models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war, with Codsworth being anotable example. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.

to:

** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices. This is justified, because they were meant to better endear themselves to their human masters, and also because many of these models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war, with Codsworth being anotable a notable example. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.


** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. This is justified, because many of these models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.

to:

** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. voices. This is justified, because they were meant to better endear themselves to their human masters, and also because many of these models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war.war, with Codsworth being anotable example. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.


** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. This is justified, because many of these moseld actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.

to:

** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. This is justified, because many of these moseld models actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the end of the war. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.


** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. This is justified, as these models are meant to better endear themselves to the humans around them given the tasks they perform. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.

to:

** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. This is justified, as because many of these models are meant to better endear themselves to moseld actually GrewBeyondTheirProgramming long after the humans around them given end of the tasks they perform.war. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.


* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' fanchise [[PlayedWith often plays with this trope]]. Most bots usually speak like this, particularly those designed for combat and war, such as Protectrons, Assaultrons and Sentinels. [[HumongousMecha Liberty Prime]] and [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas the Securitrons]] show more emotion in their dialogue, but still speak like other bots, with Liberty Prime's dialogue in particular being filled with pro-American, anti-communist propaganda. Modified Protectrons and combat robots have more varied dialogue and show some more expression, but can still revert to Robo Speak whenever they get hacked or encounter an error in their software and Protectrons in particular almost always have a MachineMonotone.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' fanchise [[PlayedWith often plays with this trope]]. Most bots usually speak like this, particularly those designed for combat and war, such as Protectrons, Assaultrons and Sentinels. [[HumongousMecha Liberty Prime]] and [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas the Securitrons]] show more emotion in their dialogue, but still speak like other bots, ina fairly stilted way, with Liberty Prime's dialogue in particular being filled with pro-American, anti-communist propaganda. Modified Protectrons and combat robots have more varied dialogue and show some more expression, but can still revert to Robo Speak whenever they get hacked or encounter an error in their software and Protectrons in particular almost always have a MachineMonotone.


* The''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' fanchise [[PlayedWith often plays with this trope]]. Most bots usually speak like this, particularly those designed for combat and war, such as Protectrons, Assaultrons and Sentinels. [[HumongousMecha Liberty Prime]] and [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas the Securitrons]] show more emotion in their dialogue, but still speak like other bots, with Liberty Prime's dialogue in particular being filled with pro-American, anti-communist propaganda. Modified Protectrons and combat robots have more varied dialogue and show some more expression, but can still revert to Robo Speak whenever they get hacked or encounter an error in their software and Protectrons in particular almost always have a MachineMonotone.

to:

* The''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' fanchise [[PlayedWith often plays with this trope]]. Most bots usually speak like this, particularly those designed for combat and war, such as Protectrons, Assaultrons and Sentinels. [[HumongousMecha Liberty Prime]] and [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas the Securitrons]] show more emotion in their dialogue, but still speak like other bots, with Liberty Prime's dialogue in particular being filled with pro-American, anti-communist propaganda. Modified Protectrons and combat robots have more varied dialogue and show some more expression, but can still revert to Robo Speak whenever they get hacked or encounter an error in their software and Protectrons in particular almost always have a MachineMonotone.

Added DiffLines:

* The''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' fanchise [[PlayedWith often plays with this trope]]. Most bots usually speak like this, particularly those designed for combat and war, such as Protectrons, Assaultrons and Sentinels. [[HumongousMecha Liberty Prime]] and [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas the Securitrons]] show more emotion in their dialogue, but still speak like other bots, with Liberty Prime's dialogue in particular being filled with pro-American, anti-communist propaganda. Modified Protectrons and combat robots have more varied dialogue and show some more expression, but can still revert to Robo Speak whenever they get hacked or encounter an error in their software and Protectrons in particular almost always have a MachineMonotone.
** Mister Handies, Mister Gutsies and Miss Nannies completely avert this, having fully expressive voices and possessing varied personalities, making them the franchise's more or less equivalent of protocol droids. This is justified, as these models are meant to better endear themselves to the humans around them given the tasks they perform. [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Synths]] from the fourth game also avert Robo Speak. Another major exception are [[BrainInAJar Robobrains]], which makes sense considering they are powered by human brains, but they still engage in some playful robo speak for fun.
*** [[MeaningfulName Yes Man]], a modified Securitron from ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' is another major avertion of the trope, as his dialogue is almost always cheerful and joyous (some lines do suggest he can be passive-aggressive toward the things he dislikes, however) and there are also some other modified Securitrons with more human-like dialogue.


Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often do so in a flat MachineMonotone voice devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. When using a language with contractions, such as English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer-derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions). Being usually perceived as servants, robots usually lack a sense of individuality and will always refer to themselves as "[[ThirdPersonPerson This unit]]" or simply state what they are doing in gerund without any personal pronouns. Examples: "THIS UNIT IS READY FOR DEPLOYMENT", "FIXING MECHANISMS".

to:

Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often do so in a flat MachineMonotone voice devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. When using a language with contractions, such as English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer-derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions).

Being usually perceived as servants, robots usually lack a sense of individuality and will always refer to themselves as "[[ThirdPersonPerson This unit]]" or simply state what they are doing in gerund without any personal pronouns. Examples: "THIS UNIT IS READY FOR DEPLOYMENT", "FIXING MECHANISMS".


Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often do so in a flat MachineMonotone voice devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. When using a language with contractions, such as English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer-derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)

Robots will also talk to each ''other'' in Robo Speak, a step ''backwards'' in technology since one would assume wireless communication between machines would be faster and stealthier. Killer cyborgs are always lurching about declaring "SER-CHING FOR HU-MANS!" and "MUST DESTROY!" -- how is this going to do anything but hinder them?

to:

Robots, androids, or any other artificially-intelligent machine with the ability to talk to humans very often do so in a flat MachineMonotone voice devoid of emotion, with machine-like gaps between each word and/or sentence. When using a language with contractions, such as English, a robot may often speak without contractions, even though a contraction would be one of the easiest parts of speech to program a computer to do correctly. Their speech also often includes numerous specialized computer-derived robotic StockPhrases, such as: "affirmative/negative" instead of "yes/no", "file not found", and the classic "does not compute" when [[LogicBomb confused]]. When written, it is often in ALL CAPS, possibly to evoke the feeling of old computers which didn't have enough memory for lower-case letters. (JapaneseMedia uses [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseWritingSystem katakana]] for similar reasons: old computers and video game cartridges didn't have ROM to spare for the thousands of characters a proper kanji font would include, and katakana is easier to read at lower graphical resolutions.)

resolutions). Being usually perceived as servants, robots usually lack a sense of individuality and will always refer to themselves as "[[ThirdPersonPerson This unit]]" or simply state what they are doing in gerund without any personal pronouns. Examples: "THIS UNIT IS READY FOR DEPLOYMENT", "FIXING MECHANISMS".

Robots will also talk to each ''other'' in Robo Speak, a step ''backwards'' in technology since one would assume wireless communication between machines would be faster and stealthier. Killer cyborgs are always lurching about declaring "SER-CHING FOR HU-MANS!" and "MUST "THREAT DETECTED. MUST DESTROY!" -- how is this going to do anything but hinder them?


Robots will also talk to each ''other'' in Robo Speak, a step ''backwards'' in technology since one would assume wireless communication between machines would be faster and stealthier. Killer cyborgs are always lurching about declaring "SER-CHING FOR HU-MANS!" -- how is this going to do anything but hinder them?

to:

Robots will also talk to each ''other'' in Robo Speak, a step ''backwards'' in technology since one would assume wireless communication between machines would be faster and stealthier. Killer cyborgs are always lurching about declaring "SER-CHING FOR HU-MANS!" and "MUST DESTROY!" -- how is this going to do anything but hinder them?


* In the Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog novel ''Literature/SonicTheHedgehogAndTheSiliconWarriors'', our hero is trying to taunt a computer (ItMakesSenseInContext) and has little success, until he unleashes an epic stream of invective in the spirit of this trope:

to:

* In the Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog novel ''Literature/SonicTheHedgehogAndTheSiliconWarriors'', our hero is trying to taunt a computer (ItMakesSenseInContext) and has little success, until he unleashes an epic stream of invective in the spirit of this trope:


* In the SonicTheHedgehog novel ''Literature/SonicTheHedgehogAndTheSiliconWarriors'', our hero is trying to taunt a computer (ItMakesSenseInContext) and has little success, until he unleashes an epic stream of invective in the spirit of this trope:

to:

* In the SonicTheHedgehog Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog novel ''Literature/SonicTheHedgehogAndTheSiliconWarriors'', our hero is trying to taunt a computer (ItMakesSenseInContext) and has little success, until he unleashes an epic stream of invective in the spirit of this trope:



* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games:

to:

* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' games:

Showing 15 edit(s) of 129

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report