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* ''Project IGI'' plays this straight with the AK-47, but otherwise goes out of its way to avert this, with even a [[GunsAkimbo second Uzi]] being properly modeled rather than just flipping the right-hand gun. The sequel delves more into this: returning guns, even the new model for the AK-47, are still modeled properly, while most of the new guns take this to an extreme, with the left-hand side being a mirror of the right while their right-hand sides are correctly modeled and textured.


** This is more because of its intended use than anything else (Samuel Colt actually was left-handed, but he had nothing to do with the SAA's design, having died about a decade before it came out). Pistols were originally meant to be used by officers and mounted units as a secondary weapon to their swords. Revolvers were worn in a cross draw holster high on the right hip for easy access from a saddle; they were historically used by cavalry ''far'' more often than by infantry (even nowadays, plenty of soldiers will tell you that, ounce for ounce, a couple extra grenades beats a pistol any day of the week). The SAA was originally intended for use by cavalry, and the .45 Long Colt cartridge, much like the massive Colt Walker, was intended to be powerful enough to bring down either man ''or horse'' with one shot. One should note that the reloading procedure for the revolver calls for holding the gun in the left hand while the right hand operates the ejector rod. As most people are right-handed, it is best for the user to use his dominant hand to operate the controls.
** In 1914, French officers were still expected to use their sidearm in conjunction with a sword. As a result, their standard-issue pistol in World War One was a revolver whose cylinder swings out to the right, for use in the left hand. Oh, and just like the case of the Colt Single Action Army, this means that the officer's right hand is doing all the complicated motions during a reloading cycle.
* The German Walther P38[=/=]P1 9mm automatic pistol, the standard service sidearm of the German Army during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the West German ''Bundeswehr'' from 1958 to about 2004, is unusual in having its extractor and ejector both on the ''left'' side of the breech; most semiautomatic pistols have the extractor on the ''right'' side (including every other pistol Walther has ever made). As a result, the P38/P1 invariably ejects its "empties" straight out to the left, or up and to the left, the opposite of pretty much every other pistol in the world. No one at Walther has ever been able to adequately explain why this one pistol was built this way.
** Some people allege that the ejection to the left may have been to prevent strange accidents in shooting galleries, where ejected casings may hit other people. Getting hot brass in the face is obviously not pleasant.

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** This is more because of its intended use than anything else (Samuel (it's frequently rumored it was made that way because Samuel Colt actually was left-handed, but he had nothing to do with the SAA's design, having died about a decade before it came out). Pistols were originally meant to be used by officers and mounted units as a secondary weapon to their swords. Revolvers were worn in a cross draw holster high on the right hip for easy access from a saddle; they were historically used by cavalry ''far'' more often than by infantry (even nowadays, plenty of soldiers will tell you that, ounce for ounce, a couple extra grenades beats a pistol any day of the week). The SAA was originally intended for use by cavalry, and the .45 Long Colt cartridge, much like the massive Colt Walker, was intended to be powerful enough to bring down either man ''or horse'' with one shot. One should note that the reloading procedure for the revolver calls for holding the gun in the left hand while the right hand operates the ejector rod. As most people are right-handed, it is best for the user to use his dominant hand to operate the controls.
shot.
** In 1914, French officers were still expected to use their sidearm in conjunction with a sword. As a result, their standard-issue pistol in World War One was a revolver whose cylinder swings out to the right, for use in the left hand. Oh, and hand; just like the case of the Colt Single Action Army, this means that the officer's right hand is doing all the complicated motions during a reloading cycle.
* The German Walther P38[=/=]P1 9mm automatic pistol, the standard service sidearm of the German Army during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the West German ''Bundeswehr'' from 1958 to about 2004, is unusual in having its extractor and ejector both on the ''left'' side of the breech; most semiautomatic pistols have the extractor on the ''right'' side (including every other pistol Walther has ever made). As a result, the P38/P1 invariably ejects its "empties" straight out to the left, or up and to the left, the opposite of pretty much every other pistol in the world. No one at Walther has ever been able to adequately explain why this one pistol was built this way.
** Some people
way.[[note]]Some allege that the ejection to the left may have been to prevent strange accidents in shooting galleries, where ejected casings may hit other people. Getting hot brass in the face is obviously not pleasant.[[/note]]


** While most pistols eject empty casings to the right, some, like the H&K USP and Walther P99, are designed with ambidextrous magazine release levers and buttons which allow users to quickly remove the magazine with either hand, at the cost of being slightly awkward for first-time users; the USP also comes in nine different variants with safety lever, decocking lever, both, or neither, with the eight that include them split evenly between left-side for right handed shooters and right-side for left handed. Others, like the latest revisions of the Beretta 92 and the Glock series, have reversible release buttons for left-handed shooters. Still others use heel-mounted release levers, popular pretty much everywhere except America, which are also easy to use with either hand. Ambidextrous slide-release levers remain rare, but that's in part because the typical placement for one in the first place makes it about as easy for a left-handed shooter to hit with their trigger finger as it is for a right-handed shooter to hit with their thumb (that plus a growing number of shooters who prefer to manually rack the slide to release it after an empty reload, which can also be done regardless of which hand you hold the pistol with).

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** While most pistols eject empty casings to the right, some, like the H&K USP and Walther P99, are designed with ambidextrous magazine release levers and buttons which allow users to quickly remove the magazine with either hand, at the cost of being slightly awkward for first-time users; the USP in particular also comes in nine different variants with safety lever, decocking lever, both, or neither, with the eight that include them split evenly between left-side for right handed shooters and right-side for left handed.handed (with conversion from right- to left-handed or vice-versa as simple as changing out the lever and moving the control plate underneath from one side to the other). Others, like the latest revisions of the Beretta 92 and the Glock series, have reversible release buttons for left-handed shooters. Still others use heel-mounted release levers, popular pretty much everywhere except America, which are also easy to use with either hand. Ambidextrous slide-release levers remain rare, but that's in part because the typical placement for one in the first place makes it about as easy for a left-handed shooter to hit with their trigger finger as it is for a right-handed shooter to hit with their thumb (that plus a growing number of shooters who prefer to manually rack the slide to release it after an empty reload, which can also be done regardless of which hand you hold the pistol with).


* Averted also in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Underground''.

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* %%(ZCE)* Averted also in ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor: Underground''.


* This happens a lot when people customise their miniatures for games such as ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}} Warhammer 40,000]]'' and do not pay attention. Sometimes the hand wielding the weapon is also wrong. Others do it intentionally for the Orks, because Orks genuinely don't care about such petty details like gun safety.

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* This happens a lot when people customise their miniatures for games such as ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}} Warhammer 40,000]]'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' and do not pay attention. Sometimes the hand wielding the weapon is also wrong. Others do it intentionally for the Orks, because Orks genuinely don't care about such petty details like gun safety.



** ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}} 1942'' and ''Vietnam'' had ''every'' gun modeled as left-handed; this practice stopped from ''2'' and onwards, save for the ''Bad Company'' spinoffs.
* ''VideoGame/{{Postal}} 2'' has a rather strange example. When you find a shotgun or sniper rifle on the ground, they will have a right-handed ejection port and bolt, but then once you pick it up and use it, the port/bolt is suddenly reversed. The corollary about simply flipping the right-side model for GunsAkimbo also comes up with the ''Paradise Lost'' DLC (which also has another straight example with its "Beta Shotgun"), though that's actually a lesser concern than, say, how the Dude makes a second copy of his current gun appear out of nowhere for a minute just from drinking a can of soda.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}} 1942'' ''VideoGame/Battlefield1942'' and ''Vietnam'' had ''every'' gun modeled as left-handed; this practice stopped from ''2'' and onwards, save for the ''Bad Company'' spinoffs.
* ''VideoGame/{{Postal}} 2'' ''VideoGame/Postal2'' has a rather strange example. When you find a shotgun or sniper rifle on the ground, they will have a right-handed ejection port and bolt, but then once you pick it up and use it, the port/bolt is suddenly reversed. The corollary about simply flipping the right-side model for GunsAkimbo also comes up with the ''Paradise Lost'' DLC (which also has another straight example with its "Beta Shotgun"), though that's actually a lesser concern than, say, how the Dude makes a second copy of his current gun appear out of nowhere for a minute just from drinking a can of soda.



* Zig-zagged in ''Videogame/PlanetSide 2''. There is little rhythm or reason to the placement of mechanisms on guns. Almost every TR weapon ejects to the right or downward, but the placement of the charging handle is seemingly random - the [[GatlingGood Mini Chaingun]] fires caseless ammo and has the bolt on the left, the CARV LMG both ejects and bolts on the right, and the TRAP-M1 has a left side-loaded magazine, ejects right, has a charging handle on the ''bottom'', and has a reciprocating firing hammer that recoils ''backwards'', which would have a good chance of whacking the shooter in the chin when aiming down the sights. Every gun's fire selector is animated on the left even when the gun has no visible selector switch; the [=T4 AMP=] pistol has the user flick the featureless grip when switching from semi to fully automatic.

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* Zig-zagged in ''Videogame/PlanetSide ''VideoGame/PlanetSide 2''. There is little rhythm or reason to the placement of mechanisms on guns. Almost every TR weapon ejects to the right or downward, but the placement of the charging handle is seemingly random - the [[GatlingGood Mini Chaingun]] fires caseless ammo and has the bolt on the left, the CARV LMG both ejects and bolts on the right, and the TRAP-M1 has a left side-loaded magazine, ejects right, has a charging handle on the ''bottom'', and has a reciprocating firing hammer that recoils ''backwards'', which would have a good chance of whacking the shooter in the chin when aiming down the sights. Every gun's fire selector is animated on the left even when the gun has no visible selector switch; the [=T4 AMP=] pistol has the user flick the featureless grip when switching from semi to fully automatic.



* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' does this with most of its weapons, but a particular standout is the bolt-action hunting rifle. Every single one of the hunting rifles in the Commonwealth is a left-handed model, with the bolt hanging over the left of the stock. Yet the player character holds the weapon right-handed, meaning they must hold onto the rifle by the pistol grip to awkwardly cycle the weapon after every shot. The direction Bethesda took here is very confusing, as the hunting rifle from their [[VideoGame/Fallout3 previous]] ''Fallout'' game was modeled correctly.

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* ''Videogame/Fallout4'' ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' does this with most of its weapons, but a particular standout is the bolt-action hunting rifle. Every single one of the hunting rifles in the Commonwealth is a left-handed model, with the bolt hanging over the left of the stock. Yet the player character holds the weapon right-handed, meaning they must hold onto the rifle by the pistol grip to awkwardly cycle the weapon after every shot. The direction Bethesda took here is very confusing, as the hunting rifle from their [[VideoGame/Fallout3 previous]] ''Fallout'' game was modeled correctly.

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** The Handmade Rifle introduced in the ''Nuka World'' add on is an interesting example. Itís based on the AKM, which in of itself is kind of backwards for western shooters anyway with all of the controls on the right hand side of the gun, but it still ejects out the right side. The Handmade Rifle swaps the safety lever and charging handle to the left side, making it seem more correct to those unfamiliar with the AK platform, but it brings with it the issue of the ejection port being on the left side as well. This is likely because of the new PowerArmor mechanic, making the animation for charging a more correct AK awkward when the player is in a suit that straddles the line into MiniMecha territory.


** This is more because of its intended use than anything else (Samuel Colt actually was left-handed, but he had nothing to do with the SAA's design, having died about a decade before it came out). Pistols were originally meant to be used by officers and mounted units as a secondary weapon to their swords. Revolvers were worn in a cross draw holster high on the right hip for easy access from a saddle; they were historically used by cavalry ''far'' more often than by infantry (even nowadays, plenty of soldiers will tell you that, ounce for ounce, a couple extra grenades beats a pistol any day of the week). The SAA was originally intended for use by cavalry, and the .45 Long Colt cartridge, much like the massive Colt Walker, was intended to be powerful enough to bring down either man ''or horse'' with one shot.
** In 1914, French officers were still expected to use their sidearm in conjunction with a sword. As a result, their standard-issue pistol in WWI was a revolver whose cylinder swings out to the right, for use in the left hand.
* The German Walther P38[=/=]P1 9mm automatic pistol, the standard service sidearm of the German Army during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the West German ''Bundeswehr'' from 1958 to about 2004, is unusual in having its extractor and ejector both on the ''left'' side of the breech; most autopistols have the extractor on the ''right'' side (including every other pistol Walther has ever made). As a result, the P38/P1 invariably ejects its "empties" straight out to the left, or up and to the left, the opposite of pretty much every other pistol in the world. No one at Walther has ever been able to adequately explain why this one pistol was built this way.

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** This is more because of its intended use than anything else (Samuel Colt actually was left-handed, but he had nothing to do with the SAA's design, having died about a decade before it came out). Pistols were originally meant to be used by officers and mounted units as a secondary weapon to their swords. Revolvers were worn in a cross draw holster high on the right hip for easy access from a saddle; they were historically used by cavalry ''far'' more often than by infantry (even nowadays, plenty of soldiers will tell you that, ounce for ounce, a couple extra grenades beats a pistol any day of the week). The SAA was originally intended for use by cavalry, and the .45 Long Colt cartridge, much like the massive Colt Walker, was intended to be powerful enough to bring down either man ''or horse'' with one shot.
shot. One should note that the reloading procedure for the revolver calls for holding the gun in the left hand while the right hand operates the ejector rod. As most people are right-handed, it is best for the user to use his dominant hand to operate the controls.
** In 1914, French officers were still expected to use their sidearm in conjunction with a sword. As a result, their standard-issue pistol in WWI World War One was a revolver whose cylinder swings out to the right, for use in the left hand.
hand. Oh, and just like the case of the Colt Single Action Army, this means that the officer's right hand is doing all the complicated motions during a reloading cycle.
* The German Walther P38[=/=]P1 9mm automatic pistol, the standard service sidearm of the German Army during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the West German ''Bundeswehr'' from 1958 to about 2004, is unusual in having its extractor and ejector both on the ''left'' side of the breech; most autopistols semiautomatic pistols have the extractor on the ''right'' side (including every other pistol Walther has ever made). As a result, the P38/P1 invariably ejects its "empties" straight out to the left, or up and to the left, the opposite of pretty much every other pistol in the world. No one at Walther has ever been able to adequately explain why this one pistol was built this way.way.
** Some people allege that the ejection to the left may have been to prevent strange accidents in shooting galleries, where ejected casings may hit other people. Getting hot brass in the face is obviously not pleasant.



*** The P90 feeds from the top and ejects rounds downward behind the firing arm, with the selector switch just below the trigger and charging handles (and side-mounted backup ironsights) on both sides.

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*** The P90 feeds from the top and ejects rounds downward behind the firing arm, with the selector switch just below the trigger and charging handles (and side-mounted backup ironsights) iron sights) on both sides.



* AK series weapons have an ejection port on the right side that is far enough away from the shooter so that you can shoot it lefty. Whilst all the controls are on the right, they are all simple enough to operate them with either the support hand or firing hand with ease from either side, no matter the handedness of the operator (actual Soviet doctrine called for right-handed operation but using the right hand for everything else as well, from reloading to cocking and taking off the safety, to eliminate the possibility of [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace accidental discharges]]).

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* AK series weapons have an ejection port on the right side that is far enough away from the shooter so that you can shoot it lefty. Whilst all the controls are on the right, they are all simple enough to operate them with either the support hand or firing hand with ease from either side, no matter the handedness of the operator (actual Soviet doctrine called for right-handed operation but using operation, including the use of the right hand for everything else as well, from reloading changing magazines to cocking the bolt handle and taking off handling the safety, safety switch, to eliminate the possibility of [[IJustShotMarvinInTheFace accidental discharges]]).



* [[TruthInTelevision Truth In Video Games]] for at least a couple of shooters. The [[SemperFi USMC]], for instance, has noticed that snipers using bolt-action rifles with the "wrong" bolt for their handedness (e.g. right-handed shooter using a lefty bolt) can cycle and refire the weapon faster than a sniper using the "correct" bolt for their handedness. The biggest reason for this is that the shooter can use their support hand to work the bolt rather than their firing hand. This gives a big benefit - the shooter doesn't have to break their grip with their firing hand, meaning they don't have to waste time ensuring their rifle is still on-target after a shot (especially since with any kind of precision supported shooting, such as with a bipod or sandbag, you don't need to support the weapon with your off hand). This has actually become a part of modern tactical shooting, from using the left hand to charge an M4, to reversible or ambidextrous charging handles on rifles like the SCAR and the above-mentioned G36.

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* [[TruthInTelevision Truth In Video Games]] for at least a couple of shooters. The [[SemperFi USMC]], for instance, has noticed that snipers using bolt-action rifles with the "wrong" bolt for their handedness (e.g. right-handed shooter using a lefty bolt) can cycle and refire re-fire the weapon faster than a sniper using the "correct" bolt for their handedness. The biggest reason for this is that the shooter can use their support hand to work the bolt rather than their firing hand. This gives a big benefit - the shooter doesn't have to break their grip with their firing hand, meaning they don't have to waste time ensuring their rifle is still on-target after a shot (especially since with any kind of precision supported shooting, such as with a bipod or sandbag, you don't need to support the weapon with your off hand). This has actually become a part of modern tactical shooting, from using the left hand to charge an M4, to reversible or ambidextrous charging handles on rifles like the SCAR and the above-mentioned G36.


** Ease of changing parts
*** The Steyr AUG for example, requires a quick change of the bolt and moving the ejection port cover to the other side; the weapon is issued with a spare bolt with the extractor and ejector on the opposite side for this purpose (save for "AUG NATO" versions compatible with M16 magazines, which are only right-handed, or variants used by the Irish military, which require specifically-ordered leftie versions).

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** Ease of changing parts
parts:
*** The Steyr AUG for example, requires a quick change of the bolt and moving the ejection port cover to the other side; the weapon is issued with a spare bolt with the extractor and ejector on the opposite side for this purpose (save for "AUG NATO" versions compatible with M16 magazines, which are only right-handed, or variants used by the Irish military, which require specifically-ordered leftie versions).



*** The Browning M2 can be set up to load ammo belts from either side, since it's designed to be used in several different mountings, including side by side and quad-mount (like Charlie's sled from ''Film/WaterWorld''), which require flexible feeding and ejecting mechanisms.

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*** The Browning M2 can be set up to load ammo belts from either side, though since it's designed you're invariably firing one from directly behind rather than holding it like a regular weapon, this is less about keeping ejected brass away from the user and more to let it be used in several different mountings, including side by side side-by-side and quad-mount quad-mounts (like Charlie's sled from ''Film/WaterWorld''), which require flexible feeding and ejecting mechanisms.


* Minor cases in ''VideoGame/GoldenEyeWii''; one gun has a flipped ejection port (the Anova [=DP3=]), and a few others have the charging handles (Ivana Spec-R and Kallos TT-9) or the safety lever (AK-47) on the wrong side. It's downplayed in that they all still eject to the right, and the AK's model was fixed for the ''Reloaded'' UpdatedRerelease.

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* Minor cases in ''VideoGame/GoldenEyeWii''; ''VideoGame/GoldenEye2010''; one gun has a flipped ejection port (the Anova [=DP3=]), and a few others have the charging handles (Ivana Spec-R and Kallos TT-9) or the safety lever (AK-47) on the wrong side. It's downplayed in that they all still eject to the right, and the AK's model was fixed for the ''Reloaded'' UpdatedRerelease.


** Ease of changing parts: The Steyr AUG for example, requires a quick change of the bolt and moving the ejection port cover to the other side; the weapon is issued with a spare bolt with the extractor and ejector on the opposite side for this purpose (save for "AUG NATO" versions compatible with M16 magazines, which are only right-handed, or variants used by the Irish military, which require specifically-ordered leftie versions). The FAMAS has cutouts on both sides of the bolt for the ejector and ejection ports on both sides of the stock, requiring nothing more than partial disassembly to flip the ejector and the cheek rest to the other side to convert.
** Direction neutral design: The P90 feeds from the top and ejects rounds downward behind the firing arm, with the selector switch just below the trigger and charging handles (and side-mounted backup ironsights) on both sides. The F2000 ejects rounds ''forward'' into a tube along the side of the rifle before they go out to the right near the front, making the problem moot (although this leaves no room for an ambidextrous charging handle). The Ithaca model 37 shotgun has a unique combined loading and ejection port, which ejects spent shells downwards. The Browning M2 can be set up to load ammo belts from either side, since it's designed to be used in several different mountings, including side by side and quad-mount (like Charlie's sled from ''Film/WaterWorld''), which require flexible feeding and ejecting mechanisms.

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** Ease of changing parts: parts
***
The Steyr AUG for example, requires a quick change of the bolt and moving the ejection port cover to the other side; the weapon is issued with a spare bolt with the extractor and ejector on the opposite side for this purpose (save for "AUG NATO" versions compatible with M16 magazines, which are only right-handed, or variants used by the Irish military, which require specifically-ordered leftie versions). versions).
***
The FAMAS has cutouts on both sides of the bolt for the ejector and ejection ports on both sides of the stock, requiring nothing more than partial disassembly to flip the ejector and the cheek rest to the other side to convert.
** Direction neutral design: design:
***
The P90 feeds from the top and ejects rounds downward behind the firing arm, with the selector switch just below the trigger and charging handles (and side-mounted backup ironsights) on both sides. The F2000 ejects rounds ''forward'' into sides.
*** Desert Tech's MDR combines this with ease of changing parts. It's
a tube along rifle of bullpup design (magazine behind the trigger), but the ejection system kicks the case to one side before the bolt chucks it forward and out. While the direction of which side the cases go to can be easily changed, the forward ejection allows it so you can still use the rifle before they go out to with the right near the front, making the problem moot (although this leaves no room for an ambidextrous charging handle). other hand if you need to.
***
The Ithaca model 37 shotgun has a unique combined loading and ejection port, which ejects spent shells downwards. downwards.
***
The Browning M2 can be set up to load ammo belts from either side, since it's designed to be used in several different mountings, including side by side and quad-mount (like Charlie's sled from ''Film/WaterWorld''), which require flexible feeding and ejecting mechanisms.


* ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon F.E.A.R. 2]]'' has one particular odd standout of this trope among an otherwise-complete aversion to it with the SHO Series-3 shotgun: among the many embellishments added to its real-world base to make the in-game model are the bolt and case deflector of a [=C7/M16A2=] - on the left-hand side, the opposite of where they would be on the rifle they came from. Why this is the case is unknown, since while the animation for pumping it between shells only plays when firing from the hip, and you can clearly see that bolt opening and closing with the pump, the gun still properly ejects shells to the right like the previous game's VK-12.

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* The ''[[VideoGame/FirstEncounterAssaultRecon F.E.A.R. 2]]'' has ]]'' games almost completely avert this - even the [[GunsAkimbo dual pistols]] in the first game clearly have both guns ejecting to the right and left-side-only safety levers - except for one particular particularly odd standout of this trope among an otherwise-complete aversion to it with the in ''F.E.A.R. 2''[='=]s SHO Series-3 shotgun: among the many embellishments added to its real-world base to make the in-game model are the bolt and case deflector of a [=C7/M16A2=] - on the left-hand side, the opposite of where they would be on the rifle they came from. Why this is the case is unknown, since while the animation for pumping it between shells only plays when firing from the hip, and you can clearly see that bolt opening and closing with the pump, the gun still properly ejects shells to the right like the previous game's VK-12.


** While most pistols eject empty casings to the right, some, like the H&K USP and Walther P99, are designed with ambidextrous magazine release levers and buttons which allow users to quickly remove the magazine with either hand, at the cost of being slightly awkward for first-time users; the USP also comes in nine different variants with safety lever, decocking lever, both, or neither, with the eight that include them split evenly between left-side for right handed shooters and right-side for left handed. Others, like the latest revisions of the Beretta 92 and the Glock series, have reversible release buttons for left-handed shooters. Still others use heel-mounted release levers, popular pretty much everywhere except America, which are also easy to use with either hand. Ambidextrous slide-release levers remain rare, but that's in part because the typical placement for one in the first place makes it about as easy for a left-handed shooter to hit with their trigger finger as it is for a right-handed shooter to hit with their thumb.

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** While most pistols eject empty casings to the right, some, like the H&K USP and Walther P99, are designed with ambidextrous magazine release levers and buttons which allow users to quickly remove the magazine with either hand, at the cost of being slightly awkward for first-time users; the USP also comes in nine different variants with safety lever, decocking lever, both, or neither, with the eight that include them split evenly between left-side for right handed shooters and right-side for left handed. Others, like the latest revisions of the Beretta 92 and the Glock series, have reversible release buttons for left-handed shooters. Still others use heel-mounted release levers, popular pretty much everywhere except America, which are also easy to use with either hand. Ambidextrous slide-release levers remain rare, but that's in part because the typical placement for one in the first place makes it about as easy for a left-handed shooter to hit with their trigger finger as it is for a right-handed shooter to hit with their thumb.thumb (that plus a growing number of shooters who prefer to manually rack the slide to release it after an empty reload, which can also be done regardless of which hand you hold the pistol with).


* In the final story adapted for the ''Manga/Golgo13'' manga, Golgo gets in a car accident and requires the assistance of a brilliant neurosurgeon to restore functionality to his right arm. Then he learns that the surgeon is the adopted son of his current target. While he doesn't give up the job, he makes a point of acquiring a left-handed M-16 to complete the job. He later tracks down and kills the man who hired him with a right-handed M-16.

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* In the final story adapted for the ''Manga/Golgo13'' manga, anime, Golgo gets in a car accident and requires the assistance of a brilliant neurosurgeon to restore functionality to his right arm. Then he learns that the surgeon is the adopted son of his current target. While he doesn't give up the job, he makes a point of acquiring a left-handed M-16 to complete the job. He later tracks down and kills the man who hired him with a right-handed M-16.


* Zig-zagged in ''Videogame/PlanetSide 2''. There is little rhythm or reason to the placement of mechanisms on guns. Almost every TR weapon ejects to the right or downward, but the placement of the charging handle is seemingly random - the [[GatlingGood Mini Chaingun]] fires caseless ammo and has the bolt on the left, the CARV LMG both ejects and bolts on the right, and the TRAP-M1 has a left side-loaded magazine, ejects right, has a charging handle on the ''bottom'', and has a reciprocating firing hammer that recoils ''backwards'', which would have a good chance of whacking the shooter in the chin when aiming down the sights. Every gun's fire selector is animated on the left even when the gun has no visible selector switch; the [=T4 AMP=] pistol has the user flick the featureless grip when switching from semi to fully automatic.
* Inverted by ''Franchise/DieHard: Nakatomi Plaza''. Probably the only LicensedGame that bothers to take into account that John [=McClane=] is [[TheSouthpaw left handed]], the models of guns are flipped over to make them suitable for a lefty. Particularly notable with the Steyr AUG, which needs a conversion kit to be fired left handed, which would make them useless to all the right handed terrorists encountered in the game.

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* Zig-zagged in ''Videogame/PlanetSide 2''. There is little rhythm or reason to the placement of mechanisms on guns. Almost every TR weapon ejects to the right or downward, but the placement of the charging handle is seemingly random - the [[GatlingGood Mini Chaingun]] fires caseless ammo and has the bolt on the left, the CARV LMG both ejects and bolts on the right, and the TRAP-M1 has a left side-loaded magazine, ejects right, has a charging handle on the ''bottom'', and has a reciprocating firing hammer that recoils ''backwards'', which would have a good chance of whacking the shooter in the chin when aiming down the sights. Every gun's fire selector is animated on the left even when the gun has no visible selector switch; the [=T4 AMP=] pistol has the user flick the featureless features grip when switching from semi to fully automatic.
* Inverted by ''Franchise/DieHard: Nakatomi Plaza''. Probably the only LicensedGame that bothers to take into account that John [=McClane=] is [[TheSouthpaw left handed]], handed, the models of guns are flipped over to make them suitable for a lefty. Particularly notable with the Steyr AUG, which needs a conversion kit to be fired left handed, which would make them useless to all the right handed terrorists encountered in the game.

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