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* In the Western ''Film/OneFootInHell'', Dan O'Herlihy plays a ConMan who passes himself off as this trope.

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* In the Western ''Film/OneFootInHell'', ''One Foot In Hell'', Dan O'Herlihy plays a ConMan who passes himself off as this trope.



* A couple of Literature/BertieWooster's friends. In "Jeeves and the Hard-Boiled Egg," he lends his apartment to Bicky Bickersteth (of the "wastrel" variety, naturally, living in a boarding house in New York when he's supposed to be farming in Colorado) so he can make his uncle think he's doing well in America. It [[GoneHorriblyRight works too well]] and the uncle decides to withdraw Bicky's allowance, since he clearly doesn't need it.

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* A couple of Literature/BertieWooster's friends. In "Jeeves and the Hard-Boiled Egg," he lends his apartment to Bicky Bickersteth (of (who's of the "wastrel" variety, naturally, living in a boarding house in New York when he's supposed to be farming in Colorado) so he can make his uncle think he's doing well in America. It This [[GoneHorriblyRight works too well]] and the uncle decides to withdraw Bicky's allowance, since he clearly doesn't need it.



* Once [[LandDownunder FourEcks]] is discovered (again) in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', there are occasional references to the younger sons of the Ankh-Morpork nobility being sent there to keep them out of trouble. In particular, in ''Discworld/TheTruth'', Lord de Word threatens his son with it, although his definition of "trouble" is "[[spoiler: stop being an honest hardworking chap who wants to stop my conspiracy]]".

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* Once [[LandDownunder FourEcks]] is discovered (again) in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', there are occasional references to the younger sons of the Ankh-Morpork nobility being sent there to keep them out of trouble. In particular, in ''Discworld/TheTruth'', Lord de Word threatens his son with it, this, although his definition of "trouble" is "[[spoiler: stop "[[spoiler:stop being an honest hardworking chap who wants to stop my conspiracy]]".



* Moriarty's client in ''TheHoundOfTheDUrbervilles'' is Jasper Stokes, who just came back from the Americas after inheriting a large estate. He's not just a wastrel, he's a sadistically cruel man who has hired goons beat his laborers to keep them in line (it's what he took away from reading German economists).

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* Moriarty's client in ''TheHoundOfTheDUrbervilles'' ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheDurbervilles'' is Jasper Stokes, who just came back from the Americas after inheriting a large estate. He's not just a wastrel, he's a sadistically cruel man who has hired goons beat his laborers to keep them in line (it's what he took away from reading German economists).


* Anthony Villiers in the eponymous series by Creator/AlexeiPanshin is a science-fictional example, though it's implied not that he's useless, but that he simply doesn't get along with his family.

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* Anthony Villiers in the eponymous series by Creator/AlexeiPanshin is a science-fictional example, though it's implied not that he's useless, but that [[FriendsAreChosenFamilyArent he simply doesn't get along with his family.family]].



* Lord Crispin Fitzjames-Holles-Clare-Malet, the Duke of Taunton's brother, in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels. A very modern example, he left his wife and children to drink and party his way around the world and admits, in the end, that he did so because he couldn't or wouldn't change and thought it better the kids not see him make a swine of himself at close range.

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* Lord Crispin Fitzjames-Holles-Clare-Malet, the Duke of Taunton's brother, in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels. A very modern example, he left his wife and children to drink and party his way around the world -- and admits, in the end, that he did so because he couldn't or wouldn't change and thought it better the kids not see him make a swine of himself at close range.



* In Creator/HBeamPiper's science fiction novel ''Four-Day Planet'' it's speculated that "Bish" Ware, the town drunk on a backwater colonial planet, is one of these. (He's generally believed to be some sort defrocked clergyman -- hence the nickname -- whose "ecclesiastical organization was paying him to stay out there in the boondocks where he wouldn't cause them further embarrassment".) In reality, [[spoiler: he's an extremely high ranking [[TheFederation Federation]] secret agent working a fifteen-year-old case against an interstellar outlaw.]]

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* In Creator/HBeamPiper's science fiction novel ''Four-Day Planet'' it's speculated that "Bish" Ware, the town drunk on a backwater colonial planet, is one of these. (He's generally believed to be some sort of defrocked clergyman -- hence the nickname -- whose "ecclesiastical organization was paying him to stay out there in the boondocks where he wouldn't cause them further embarrassment".) In reality, [[spoiler: he's an extremely high ranking [[TheFederation Federation]] secret agent working a fifteen-year-old case against an interstellar outlaw.]]



* In ''Series/TheCrown2016'', Edward VIII was effectively exiled by [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor his family]] after he [[AbdicateTheThrone abdicated]] to marry his twice-divorced lover, Wallis Simpson, an event that still casts a shadow over a decade later. He survives off an allowance from his family and his presence in England is received ''very'' coldly by them.

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* In ''Series/TheCrown2016'', Edward VIII was effectively exiled by [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor his family]] after he [[AbdicateTheThrone abdicated]] to marry his twice-divorced lover, Wallis Simpson, an event that still casts a shadow over a decade decades later. He survives off an allowance from his family and his presence in England is received ''very'' coldly by them. As this is fairly accurately based on historical fact, it can also be taken as a Real Life example and TruthInTelevision.



-->Black sheep of the family clan
-->Broke too many rules along the way

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-->Black sheep of the family clan
-->Broke
clan\\
Broke
too many rules along the wayway...


* In ''Series/TheCrown2016'', Edward VIII was effectively exiled by [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor his family]] after he [[AbdicateTheThrone abdicated]] to marry his thrice-divorced lover, Wallis Simpson, an event that still casts a shadow over a decade later. He survives off an allowance from his family and his presence in England is received ''very'' coldly by them.

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* In ''Series/TheCrown2016'', Edward VIII was effectively exiled by [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor his family]] after he [[AbdicateTheThrone abdicated]] to marry his thrice-divorced twice-divorced lover, Wallis Simpson, an event that still casts a shadow over a decade later. He survives off an allowance from his family and his presence in England is received ''very'' coldly by them.

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* In ''Series/TheCrown2016'', Edward VIII was effectively exiled by [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor his family]] after he [[AbdicateTheThrone abdicated]] to marry his thrice-divorced lover, Wallis Simpson, an event that still casts a shadow over a decade later. He survives off an allowance from his family and his presence in England is received ''very'' coldly by them.

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* In Creator/HBeamPiper's science fiction novel ''Four-Day Planet'' it's speculated that "Bish" Ware, the town drunk on a backwater colonial planet, is one of these. (He's generally believed to be some sort defrocked clergyman -- hence the nickname -- whose "ecclesiastical organization was paying him to stay out there in the boondocks where he wouldn't cause them further embarrassment".) In reality, [[spoiler: he's an extremely high ranking [[TheFederation Federation]] secret agent working a fifteen-year-old case against an interstellar outlaw.]]

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* Literature/{{Serpico}} claims to be a modern-day remittance man, with wealthy parents who pay anything to keep him away, to avoid revealing to his friends in Greenwich Village that he's actually a cop. They jokingly congratulate him on having such wise and wealthy parents.


"That fop with the English Accent." An upper-crust younger [[BlueBlood son of an English lord]] with no prospect of inheriting, sent off to the Americas (or Australia, or South Africa, or anywhere on the map that happens to be painted pink during the time period) to get him out of the way. Usually given a small allowance (the "remittance"), that isn't ''quite'' sufficient to support him in the way he is accustomed but ''is'' enough to support him -- if he'll just pare back his standards a bit. He also has an ingrained aversion to "working in trade", and he's not used to manual labor.

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"That fop with the English Accent." An upper-crust younger [[BlueBlood son of an English lord]] with no prospect of inheriting, sent off to the Americas (or Australia, or South Africa, or anywhere on the map that happens to be painted pink [[http://manchesterhistorian.com/2013/painting-the-world-pink/ pink]] during the time period) to get him out of the way. Usually given a small allowance (the "remittance"), that isn't ''quite'' sufficient to support him in the way he is accustomed but ''is'' enough to support him -- if he'll just pare back his standards a bit. He also has an ingrained aversion to "working in trade", and he's not used to manual labor.


* One shows up in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance (he has a ranch he inherited from an uncle, who in turn was a good example of this trope, instead). It turns out that he is quite a bit more badass (and moral) than the Americans that decide to pick on him.

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* One shows up along with a butler in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance (he has a ranch he inherited from an uncle, who in turn was a good example of this trope, instead). It turns out that he is quite a bit more badass (and moral) than the Americans that decide to pick on him. At the story's conclusion, he rushes to prevent the townsfolk from giving another newcomer the same treatment he received... but joins right in when he realizes it's an acquaintance [[SeriousBusiness who uses the wrong club when golfing.]]


* In another SF example, Cadman Weyland describes another member of the first interstellar expedition as "the ultimate remittance man" in LarryNiven's ''The Legacy of Heorot''

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* In another SF example, Cadman Weyland describes another member of the first interstellar expedition as "the ultimate remittance man" in LarryNiven's Creator/LarryNiven's ''The Legacy of Heorot''Heorot''.


* One shows up in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance. It turns out that he is quite a bit more badass (and moral) than the Americans that decide to pick on him.

to:

* One shows up in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance.allowance (he has a ranch he inherited from an uncle, who in turn was a good example of this trope, instead). It turns out that he is quite a bit more badass (and moral) than the Americans that decide to pick on him.

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* Moriarty's client in ''TheHoundOfTheDUrbervilles'' is Jasper Stokes, who just came back from the Americas after inheriting a large estate. He's not just a wastrel, he's a sadistically cruel man who has hired goons beat his laborers to keep them in line (it's what he took away from reading German economists).


* One shows up in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance.

to:

* One shows up in the ComicBook/LuckyLuke story "The Tenderfoot", though he doesn't receive an allowance. It turns out that he is quite a bit more badass (and moral) than the Americans that decide to pick on him.


"That fop with the English Accent." An upper-crust younger [[BlueBlood son of an English lord]] with no prospect of inheriting, sent off to the Americas (or Australia, or South Africa, or anywhere on the map that happens to be painted pink during the time period) to get him out of the way. Usually given a small allowance (the "remittance"), that isn't sufficient to support him in the way he is accustomed. He also has an ingrained aversion to "working in trade", and he's not used to manual labor.

to:

"That fop with the English Accent." An upper-crust younger [[BlueBlood son of an English lord]] with no prospect of inheriting, sent off to the Americas (or Australia, or South Africa, or anywhere on the map that happens to be painted pink during the time period) to get him out of the way. Usually given a small allowance (the "remittance"), that isn't ''quite'' sufficient to support him in the way he is accustomed.accustomed but ''is'' enough to support him -- if he'll just pare back his standards a bit. He also has an ingrained aversion to "working in trade", and he's not used to manual labor.


* JimmyBuffett's "Remittance Man":

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* JimmyBuffett's Music/JimmyBuffett's "Remittance Man":



* A character type in the ''{{Traveller}}'' roleplaying game. (Though it's a science fiction setting, there are plenty of useless nobility around.) Perfect for the player who wants an eclectic skill set, no fixed responsibilities, and a good motivation for adventuring (i.e., get money).

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* A character type in the ''{{Traveller}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' roleplaying game. (Though it's a science fiction setting, there are plenty of useless nobility around.) Perfect for the player who wants an eclectic skill set, no fixed responsibilities, and a good motivation for adventuring (i.e., get money).

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* In the Western ''Film/OneFootInHell'', Dan O'Herlihy plays a ConMan who passes himself off as this trope.

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