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In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear such as smartphones and point-and-shoot cameras, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented.[[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator with access to one can do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused.[[/note]]

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In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear such as smartphones and point-and-shoot cameras, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented.[[note]]Now implemented[[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator with access to one can do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused.[[/note]]
[[/note]].



In theory Rack Focus should be made redundant in new [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDMovie 3D films]] because the viewer would be able to change focus at will. Of course because it is a simulation of 3D this isn't quite true and the technique remains. This sometimes causes frustration as the viewer wants to change focus but cannot.

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In theory Rack Focus should be made redundant in new [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDMovie 3D films]] because the viewer would be able to change focus at will. Of course because it is only a simulation of 3D 3D, this isn't quite true and the technique remains. This sometimes causes frustration as the viewer wants to change focus but cannot.


* In ''WesternAnimation/BarbieInTheTwelveDancingPrincesses'', a close-up of Twyla watching the princesses' sing their birthday song for the triplets shifts its focus to Brutus spying on them from the door behind her.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/BarbieInTheTwelveDancingPrincesses'', a close-up of Twyla watching the princesses' princesses sing their birthday song for the triplets shifts its focus to Brutus spying on them from the door behind her.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/StarTrekPicard'': In "Nepenthe", the camera remains still while the point of focus switches from Elnor's face to the Fenris Rangers SOS tag that's dangling beneath a desk. After a few seconds, the process is reversed, and the token becomes blurry once more while the details of Elnor's visage gradually become sharp again just as he grabs the device. The focus returns to the beacon when there's an ExtremeCloseUp of Elnor's left eye and part of his nose while he's holding it. After he activates the distress signal, his features are then made clear at the expense of the object's.

Added DiffLines:

* At the beginning of ''Film/HannahMontanaTheMovie'', we get a close-up of a poster of Hannah which shifts its focus to a close-up of Miley putting on her mascara in the foreground.

Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/BarbieInTheTwelveDancingPrincesses'', a close-up of Twyla watching the princesses' sing their birthday song for the triplets shifts its focus to Brutus spying on them from the door behind her.


In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear such as smartphones and point-and-shoot cameras, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator with access to one can do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused.[[/note]]

to:

In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear such as smartphones and point-and-shoot cameras, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator with access to one can do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused.[[/note]]


* The opening song of ''Disney/TheLionKing'', when the focus shifts from a line of [[MisplacedWildlife leaf-cutter ants]] on a branch in the foreground to a herd of zebra thundering by below.

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* The opening song of ''Disney/TheLionKing'', ''WesternAnimation/TheLionKing1994'', when the focus shifts from a line of [[MisplacedWildlife leaf-cutter ants]] on a branch in the foreground to a herd of zebra thundering by below.



* Used to dramatic effect in ''Disney/BigHero6'' when [[spoiler: Hiro rips out Baymax's healthcare chip and throws it onto the floor. The chip rolls to the foreground, where the camera focuses on it to show that Hiro has essentially tossed away his morals.]]

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* Used to dramatic effect in ''Disney/BigHero6'' ''WesternAnimation/BigHero6'' when [[spoiler: Hiro rips out Baymax's healthcare chip and throws it onto the floor. The chip rolls to the foreground, where the camera focuses on it to show that Hiro has essentially tossed away his morals.]]


* Used in ''WesternAnimation/AllDogsGoToHeaven'' when Charlie and Itchy are discussing what to do about Anne-Marie after [[spoiler:Carface has destroyed their casino]]. The background slowly comes into focus to reveal [[spoiler:Anne-Marie listening in as Charlie says they'll just dump her in an orphanage.]]

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* Used in ''WesternAnimation/AllDogsGoToHeaven'' when Charlie and Itchy are discussing what to do about Anne-Marie after [[spoiler:Carface has destroyed their casino]]. The background slowly comes into focus to reveal [[spoiler:Anne-Marie listening in [[BrokenPedestal as Charlie says they'll just dump her in an orphanage.orphanage]].]]


* In ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'', when Eddie has his EurekaMoment, with Eddie in the foreground and the newsreel footage in the background.\

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* In ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'', when Eddie has his EurekaMoment, with Eddie in the foreground and the newsreel footage in the background.\


* Used in ''WesternAnimation/AllDogsGoToHeaven'' when Charlie and Itchy are discussing what to do about Anne-Marie after [[spoiler:Carface has destroyed their casino]]. The background slowly comes into focus to reveal [[spoiler:Anne-Marie listening in as Charlie says they'll just dump her in an orphanage.]]



* In ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'', when Eddie has his EurekaMoment, with Eddie in the foreground and the newsreel footage in the background.

to:

* In ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'', when Eddie has his EurekaMoment, with Eddie in the foreground and the newsreel footage in the background.\
** Also done when Jessica is standing outside Maroon Studios after [[spoiler:knocking out Roger and putting him in the trunk of her car]], the focus shifting from her in the foreground to the lit window of Maroon's office in the background, where Eddie is confronting him.


[[folder:Web Comics]]

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[[folder:Web Comics]][[folder:Webcomics]]
* ''Webcomic/CucumberQuest'': Used in the first two panels of [[http://cucumber.gigidigi.com/cq/page-307/ this page.]] As the Nightmare Knight turns to leave and Parfait turns to look at him, the "camera" appears to change focus from Parfait in the foreground to the Nightmare Knight in the background.



%% commented out since Administrivia/WeblinksAreNotExamples * Used in ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'', in a single panel, [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=006701 here]].
* In the ''[[WebComic/TeamFortress2 Team Fortress]] Comics #5'', "Old Wounds", rack focus is emulated in one panel [[http://www.teamfortress.com/tf05_old_wounds/#f=20 here]].

to:

%% commented out since Administrivia/WeblinksAreNotExamples * Used in ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'', in a single animated panel, [[http://www.mspaintadventures.com/?s=6&p=006701 here]].
here]]. [[AuthorAvatar Hussie]] brandishes a gun, and the focus shifts from him in the background to the gun in the foreground.
* In the ''[[WebComic/TeamFortress2 ''[[Webcomic/TeamFortress2 Team Fortress]] Comics #5'', "Old Wounds", rack focus is emulated in one panel [[http://www.teamfortress.com/tf05_old_wounds/#f=20 here]]. The focus shifts from the background to a character in the foreground.

Added DiffLines:

** As Will [[{{Blackmail}} threatens Finn with prison]] after [[FrameUp "finding" marijuana in his locker]] in the pilot episode, the camera refocuses on a pamphlet/flyer pinned on the corkboard right next to him reading "Priority #1: Help the Kids". The same shot is [[CallBack duplicated]] in season four when Will finally admits what he did.


In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] (originally designed for newspaper photographers creating web content) have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality for all but NoBudget directors, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator can do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused, and as [=DSLRs=] and their smaller EVIL brethren become cheaper and more popular, it probably will be.[[/note]]

to:

In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear, gear such as smartphones and point-and-shoot cameras, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] (originally designed for newspaper photographers creating web content) have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality for all but NoBudget directors, reality, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator with access to one can do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused, and as [=DSLRs=] and their smaller EVIL brethren become cheaper and more popular, it probably will be.misused.[[/note]]


In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] (originally designed for newspaper photographers creating web content) have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality for all but NoBudget directors, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator can do, but it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused, and as [=DSLRs=] and their smaller EVIL brethren become cheaper and more popular, it probably will be.[[/note]]

to:

In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] (originally designed for newspaper photographers creating web content) have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality for all but NoBudget directors, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator can do, but do. However, it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Unlike DSLR lenses, cinema lenses are engineered to eliminate that quirk. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused, and as [=DSLRs=] and their smaller EVIL brethren become cheaper and more popular, it probably will be.[[/note]]


In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] (originally designed for newspaper photographers creating web content) have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality for all but NoBudget directors, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator can do, but it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused, and as [=DSLRs=] and their smaller EVIL brethren become cheaper and more popular, it probably will be.[[/note]]

to:

In motion picture and film-based television production, this is often done by a separate person (the "focus puller" or "first camera assistant") rather than by the primary camera operator. In video production, the cameras usually aren't large enough for this to be necessary, and on consumer-level gear, it might not even be possible because of the way autofocus is usually implemented. [[note]]Now that video-equipped [=DSLRs=] (originally designed for newspaper photographers creating web content) have made inexpensive, near-film-quality video a reality for all but NoBudget directors, rack focus is something nearly any camera operator can do, but it requires either a very steady hand (and tripod), a pile of expensive Hollywood-style equipment (the big guys are starting to use [=DSLRs=] too), or a software hack like Magic Lantern that can automate the process by taking over the camera's autofocus mechanism. Also take note of a lens quirk called focus breathing, where the lens may slightly zoom in or out when the focus is adjusted. Needless to say, like every other pro trick that amateurs pick up, it can be horribly misused, and as [=DSLRs=] and their smaller EVIL brethren become cheaper and more popular, it probably will be.[[/note]]

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