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* In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', following his defeat of Frieza, Goku is put into one of these situations where he has to get off Planet Namek before it explodes. At first it looks like he didn't make it due to Frieza's ship falling into molten lava, but it's eventually revealed that he spotted one of the Ginyu Force's pods and used it to get off the planet in time.

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* In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', following his defeat of Frieza, Goku is put into one of these situations where he has to get off Planet Namek before it explodes.[[EarthShatteringKaboom explodes]]. At first it looks like he didn't make it due to Frieza's ship falling into molten lava, but it's eventually revealed that he spotted one of the Ginyu Force's pods and used it to get off the planet in time.

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* In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', following his defeat of Frieza, Goku is put into one of these situations where he has to get off Planet Namek before it explodes. At first it looks like he didn't make it due to Frieza's ship falling into molten lava, but it's eventually revealed that he spotted one of the Ginyu Force's pods and used it to get off the planet in time.

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* ''Manga/AssassinationClassroom'': On March 13th of the next year, Koro-sensei plans to blow up the Earth. The students, along with the handful of people aware of the threat, only have a year to kill him.

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* ''Literature/WonderWomanWarbringer'': To prevent the war she's foretold to cause Alia has to go to the tomb of Helena of Troy and bathe in the waters of the spring before the sun sets on the first day of the Hekatombaion, leaving the group with very little time.


* The central gimmick of the old novel series ''Race Against Time'', [[CaptainObvious obviously]], although the actual reason for the title is a bit lame: a kid and his retired super spy-ish uncle are [[OneLastJob called to help some old friend of the uncle's]] who's gotten in trouble, and they have to solve the mystery/defeat the villain and then get home again before the kid's parents get home from a business trip and find out what they've been up to.

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* The central gimmick of the old novel series ''Race Against Time'', [[CaptainObvious obviously]], although the actual reason for the title is a bit lame: a kid and his retired super spy-ish uncle are [[OneLastJob called to help some old friend of the uncle's]] who's gotten in trouble, and they have to solve the mystery/defeat the villain and then get home again before the kid's parents get home from a business trip and find out what they've been up to.


* The second half of ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate'' features Okabe trying to get enough clues as to how to undo the changes he previously did to the past before [[spoiler: Mayuri dies, always at 8 PM.]] Every time he succeeds, the deadline gets delayed for 24 more hours.

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* The second half of ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate'' features Okabe trying to get enough clues as to how to undo the changes he previously did to the past before [[spoiler: Mayuri [[spoiler:Mayuri dies, always at 8 PM.]] PM]]. Every time he succeeds, the deadline gets delayed for 24 more hours.



** In the Alabasta Arc, Crocodile hid a huge TimeBomb somewhere in Alabasta, prompting the Straw Hats and Vivi to search for it. The Marines even [[EnemyMine helped them out]] because the situation was that bad.

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** In the Alabasta Arc, Crocodile hid a huge TimeBomb somewhere in Alabasta, prompting the Straw Hats and Vivi to search for it. The Marines even [[EnemyMine helped them out]] because the situation was that bad. To make things worse, they didn't know that the bomb was a TimeBomb at all. All they knew was that the bomb was supposed to be fired as a cannonball in a specific time. While Vivi managed to stop the cannon, she could not defuse the bomb itself as there was only less than a minute left..



* In the third part of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', the villain, while empowering himself, accidentally gives the same power to the Joestar family, since he [[spoiler: [[ItMakesSenseInContext has the body of their deceased ancestor from the neck down]]. ]] While both the protagonist and his grandpa got pretty decent power ups out of that, the mother of the protagonist [[PowerIncontinence doesn't have enough willpower to control her ability]]. Because of that, her new found power [[BlessedWithSuck slowly starts killing her]], and the only way to save her - find and kill the villain before she dies (around fifty days to be precise). Thus, the entirety of the third part is a race against time.

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* In the third part of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', the villain, while empowering himself, accidentally gives the same power to the Joestar family, since he [[spoiler: [[ItMakesSenseInContext [[spoiler:[[ItMakesSenseInContext has the body of their deceased ancestor from the neck down]]. ]] While both the protagonist and his grandpa got pretty decent power ups out of that, the mother of the protagonist [[PowerIncontinence doesn't have enough willpower to control her ability]]. Because of that, her new found power [[BlessedWithSuck slowly starts killing her]], and the only way to save her - find and kill the villain before she dies (around fifty days to be precise). Thus, the entirety of the third part is a race against time.


** ''Series/{{Wipeout2008}}''

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** ''Series/{{Wipeout2008}}''''Series/Wipeout2008''


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[[folder: Real [[folder:Real Life]]


!!Examples

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!!Examples
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* ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]''. ''Always.''
* Inverted in ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek: TOS]]'' where the good guys essentially gave the bad guys an ultimatum; "Back off or we blow ourselves -- and you -- to smithereens" and then start the clock ticking.
** This returns in every Star Trek series. Threatening to self-destruct seems to be a fairly common tactic among Starfleet captains.
* ''Series/RobinHood'' features an episode where the Sheriff goes missing, and must be found by sunset or Nottingham will be destroyed.
* The RealTime episode of ''Series/{{Mash}}'', "Life Time": the surgeons have to perform a critical operation in the time frame of the episode. This is further dramatized by a ticking clock counter superposed on the lower right corner of the screen.
* In ''Series/{{Lost}}'', according to Ms. Hawking, Ben has only 70 hours to reunite the Oceanic 6 and (presumably) return to the island or "God help us all."
* Happens in an episode of the original ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|1978}}''. Strangely, the writers got confused and the meaning of the timer changed mid-plot.
** The first episode (post-miniseries-pilot) of the new series featured a recurring countdown of exactly 33 minutes between Cylon attacks on the colonial fleet.
* In the episode "Endgame" of ''Series/BabylonFive'' the liberation fleet must destroy the Earth orbital defense system redirected at the planet's surface by the insane governor before it opens fire.
* On ''Series/PrisonBreak'', they're usually racing against a season-long clock and a tinier clock in a number of episodes.
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'':
** In the season 1 episode "Ability", Olivia disarms a timed bomb on the top of a skyscraper by turning out a set of small lights only by staring at them, succeeding with two seconds left on the timer.
** The season 4 episode "Worlds Apart" is a bit of an unusual example in two respects. First, the heroes still have roughly 8 minutes left on the clock when they [[spoiler:sever the connection between the universes]] to stop an EarthShatteringKaboom. Second, they could have done that at any time -- they just weren't thrilled about the side effects, so they wait on doing it until it becomes clear that it's the only viable option.



* In ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', almost the entirety of ''The Great Game'' is one big Race Against The Clock.
* ''Series/TheXFiles''
** Episode "731": Mulder doesn't have much time to separate a boxcar with an alien-human hybrid (or was it?) and a time bomb from the rest of the train. He also needs to find out the code to open the sealed door of the aforementioned boxcar.
** In "S.R.819" Mulder and Scully have one day to find out who poisoned Skinner and they need to find a cure as well.
** "Beyond the Sea": The FBI and police have five days to find a pair of kidnapped teenagers who are tortured and will be found dead if the offender is not caught.
--->'''Scully:''' That's a grim deadline.
* ''Series/MacGyver1985'': In "Nightmares", an interrogator gives [=MacGyver=] a slow-acting poison, and tells him that if he doesn't get the antidote within six hours, his death will be inevitable. There is a prominently-displayed countdown timer. [=MacGyver=] gets the antidote with two and a half minutes to spare, and makes a full recovery. It's never explained how they were able to state the time limit so exactly — the interrogator says that the poison was calibrated specially for [=MacGyver=], but that just changes the question to how they got the medical information about [=MacGyver=] they'd need for the calibration.

to:

----
* ''Series/TwentyFour''. ''Always.''
* The CBS newsmagazine ''48 Hours'' was titled in that manner as the stories covered by the show literally took place over a two day period. The show kept the title even though it now covers long-term TrueCrime stories.
* In ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', almost the entirety episode "Endgame" of ''The Great Game'' is one big Race Against The Clock.
* ''Series/TheXFiles''
** Episode "731": Mulder doesn't have much time to separate a boxcar with an alien-human hybrid (or was it?) and a time bomb from
''Series/BabylonFive'' the rest liberation fleet must destroy the Earth orbital defense system redirected at the planet's surface by the insane governor before it opens fire.
* Happens in an episode
of the train. He also needs to find out original ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|1978}}''. Strangely, the code to open writers got confused and the sealed door meaning of the aforementioned boxcar.
timer changed mid-plot.
** In "S.R.819" Mulder and Scully have one day to find out who poisoned Skinner and they need to find a cure as well.
** "Beyond
The first episode (post-miniseries-pilot) of the Sea": The FBI and police have five days to find [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 new series]] featured a pair of kidnapped teenagers who are tortured and will be found dead if the offender is not caught.
--->'''Scully:''' That's a grim deadline.
* ''Series/MacGyver1985'': In "Nightmares", an interrogator gives [=MacGyver=] a slow-acting poison, and tells him that if he doesn't get the antidote within six hours, his death will be inevitable. There is a prominently-displayed
recurring countdown timer. [=MacGyver=] gets the antidote with two and a half of exactly 33 minutes to spare, and makes a full recovery. It's never explained how they were able to state between Cylon attacks on the time limit so exactly — the interrogator says that the poison colonial fleet.
* A similar plot happened in ''Series/TheBill'' because Reg Hollis
was calibrated specially for [=MacGyver=], but that just changes the dumb enough to ask a prisoner a question pertinent to how they got their inquires while he was being detained, so everyone suddenly has a lot less time than expected to get the medical information required evidence or release him.
* In the ''Series/BrooklynNineNine'' episode "48 Hours", after making an arrest with too little proof, Detective Jake Peralta has 48 hours to get the evidence or the perp goes free, forcing the Nine-nine to work over the weekend.
-->'''Captain Holt:''' Detective Peralta has made a collar in the jewelry store heist. He didn't get sufficient evidence to make it stick, so we have the next 48 hours to fix his mistake.
* In the ''Series/CasesOfTheFirstDepartment'' episode "48 Hours", Capt. Martin Prazak arrests a suspect even though he was instructed only to follow him and find out his identity. However, Prazak knew that he was
about [=MacGyver=] they'd need to attack his next victim, a frail old guy who has just collected his monthly pension from the post office. The suspect has no ID and refuses to speak. His fingerprints are not in the Czech database. They can hold him only for two days without telling him the charges and they have in fact less than 48 hours because they lost some time in transporting him to the station and they have to prepare his release with a public prosecutor in advance. Their only lead is a train ticket from Kladno to Prague and the fact that he might be a foreigner from eastern Europe as he "might have hissed something in Russian or Slovak" when he was being arrested.
* ''Series/TheCollector'' has standardized [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the Devil]]: For a period of ten years the client gets what he asked for. In the last 48 hours, the benefits of the deal (and sometimes other effects) will gradually disappear, and at their end his soul would be taken. Typically that's when the local debt collector would find him and give him a chance to go early. Almost every episode, the protagonist Morgan is allowed to help a client in his last 48 hours find redemption and be freed of his deal; once he makes contact with him, the countdown starts in his [[PostModernMagik collector's cellphone]], which zeroes on success. In "The Yogi," the title character {{lampshades}} how artificial the round numbers seem.
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'': In "Invisible Evidence", a judge throws out all of the evidence against an accused rapist-murderer because a search warrant was not obtained to search the car where the evidence was found. Gil gets a 24 hour continuance
for the calibration.team to gather new evidence.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E742 "42"]]: The Doctor and Martha land on a spaceship which is going to crash into a sun in 42 minutes unless they can manage to repair it.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E13LastOfTheTimeLords "Last of the Time Lords"]]: The Master activates a countdown clock to when his fleet of spaceships intended for universal conquest launches. Unfortunately for him, the Doctor knows all too well of his inability to resist ticking clocks, and he and Martha have timed their plan to use said clock against him.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E1TheEleventhHour "The Eleventh Hour"]]: At the climax, the Doctor has 20 minutes to locate Prisoner Zero or the Atraxi will destroy the Earth. And to make things more difficult, he doesn't have access to either the TARDIS or the sonic screwdriver.
* ''Series/TheEqualizer''.
** As part of his usual MindScrew tactics, Robert [=McCall=] gives a crime boss 24 hours to shut down his organisation or die. The man laughs this off, but finds himself subject to various other harassment tactics, including [=McCall=] ringing up to remind him how many hours he has left.
** In "No Conscience", an innocent bystander is [[MistakenForSpies Mistaken For A Spy]] and tortured for the MacGuffin. Realising he's going to be killed if he doesn't think of something, he comes up with the 48 hour trope himself. The villains give him 24 hours, but eventually agree to 36. Then he has to hire [=McCall=] (who points out that 12 hours have already passed by the time they interview their first witness) to find out what they wanted in the first place.



* ''Series/{{Stitchers}}'': "Stitching" (inserting a living person's consciousness into the memories of a deceased person) is inherently one of these, since there's only a short time before the deceased brain loses viability.
** An episode towards the end of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' played on the same premise: only in this case the subject of this mind trip was dy''ing'' and Bashir and O'Brien had to extract vital information on an antidote before he died.
* One episode of ''Series/NightCourt'' manages to use the trope. Harry and the court have been rushing to finish 200 cases in a single six-hour shift (because of a federal order to dismiss any cases not arraigned by midnight), but his last case proves a problem. While it's a felony case he can just send to a grand jury, the suspect is refusing to waive his right to have his charges read, hoping the clock runs out and he gets off. But then Dan saves the day by going MotorMouth and reading off the entire rap sheet with 20 seconds to spare. Everyone's so stunned that Dan has to yell to Harry, "''MY GOD, MAN! GAVEL!''" to make him officially adjourn the court before midnight hit.
* ''Series/{{CSI}}'': In "Invisible Evidence", a judge throws out all of the evidence against an accused rapist-murderer because a search warrant was not obtained to search the car where the evidence was found. Gil gets a 24 hour continuance for the team to gather new evidence.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' used this quite a bit, though one writer took it a bit too far by writing no fewer than ''three'' different episodes where the team had to prevent something that was going to happen "in two days at 4:00."
** Happens in the third movie as well: Ethan Hunt gets 48 hours to complete a HostageForMcGuffin scheme.
* ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' uses the final "can only be held so long" variant frequently, along with the statute of limitations.
** ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'': In "Countdown", a girl is kidnapped by a pedophile who always kills his victims after three days. The detectives have to figure out who he is and find him before the girl runs out of time.



* The CBS newsmagazine ''48 Hours'' was titled in that manner as the stories covered by the show literally took place over a two day period. The show kept the title even though it now covers long-term TrueCrime stories.

to:

* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'':
** In the season 1 episode "Ability", Olivia disarms a timed bomb on the top of a skyscraper by turning out a set of small lights only by staring at them, succeeding with two seconds left on the timer.
**
The CBS newsmagazine ''48 Hours'' was titled season 4 episode "Worlds Apart" is a bit of an unusual example in two respects. First, the heroes still have roughly 8 minutes left on the clock when they [[spoiler:sever the connection between the universes]] to stop an EarthShatteringKaboom. Second, they could have done that manner as at any time -- they just weren't thrilled about the stories covered side effects, so they wait on doing it until it becomes clear that it's the only viable option.
* ''Series/TheGreatestAmericanHero:'' In "Operation: Spoilsport", Ralph and Bill are informed
by the show literally took place over supersuit-bestowing aliens that within a two day period. The show kept couple of days, the title even though it now covers long-term TrueCrime stories.eponymous secret government protocol will be maliciously activated, setting off World War III.



* An episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' features "ghost sickness," which kills its victims in 48 hours after causing them to fear everything. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpKgqwugHjA Like cats.]]

to:

* An ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' uses the final "can only be held so long" variant frequently, along with the statute of limitations.
** ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'': In "Countdown", a girl is kidnapped by a pedophile who always kills his victims after three days. The detectives have to figure out who he is and find him before the girl runs out of time.
* In ''Series/{{Lost}}'', according to Ms. Hawking, Ben has only 70 hours to reunite the Oceanic 6 and (presumably) return to the island or "God help us all."
* ''Series/{{MacGyver|1985}}'': In "Nightmares", an interrogator gives [=MacGyver=] a slow-acting poison, and tells him that if he doesn't get the antidote within six hours, his death will be inevitable. There is a prominently-displayed countdown timer. [=MacGyver=] gets the antidote with two and a half minutes to spare, and makes a full recovery. It's never explained how they were able to state the time limit so exactly — the interrogator says that the poison was calibrated specially for [=MacGyver=], but that just changes the question to how they got the medical information about [=MacGyver=] they'd need for the calibration.
* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'': A radio game offered Peggy a prize if she got Al to return home that day for a nooner (sex anytime within the first hour after noon).
* The RealTime
episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' features "ghost sickness," which kills its victims ''Series/{{MASH}}'', "Life Time": the surgeons have to perform a critical operation in the time frame of the episode. This is further dramatized by a ticking clock counter superposed on the lower right corner of the screen.
* ''Series/MidnightCaller'': In "Baby Chase", a woman kidnaps a diabetic baby who has only a few days to live without insulin. The kidnapper makes the time limit even shorter by feeding her sugary formula. By the time she's finally rescued, she's on the verge of a coma.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' used this quite a bit, though one writer took it a bit too far by writing no fewer than ''three'' different episodes where the team had to prevent something that was going to happen "in two days at 4:00."
** Happens in the third movie as well: Ethan Hunt gets
48 hours after causing to complete a HostageForMcGuffin scheme.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Defiance", the daughter of a foreign diplomat is kidnapped from NCIS custody, and Vance gives Gibbs' team 48 hours to find her before demanding [=DiNozzo=]'s and [=McGee=]'s badges.
** Lampshaded once, a group of marines in a training exercise find an armed bomb with about 3 minutes left on the clock. 10 seconds later the bomb goes off and the Gunnery Sgt. reminds
them of Evil Overlord Rule #15: Never assume a bomb's timer is accurate.
* One episode of ''Series/NightCourt'' manages
to fear everything. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpKgqwugHjA Like cats.]]use the trope. Harry and the court have been rushing to finish 200 cases in a single six-hour shift (because of a federal order to dismiss any cases not arraigned by midnight), but his last case proves a problem. While it's a felony case he can just send to a grand jury, the suspect is refusing to waive his right to have his charges read, hoping the clock runs out and he gets off. But then Dan saves the day by going MotorMouth and reading off the entire rap sheet with 20 seconds to spare. Everyone's so stunned that Dan has to yell to Harry, "''MY GOD, MAN! GAVEL!''" to make him officially adjourn the court before midnight hit.



-->'''Michael:''' ''(being blamed for an obscene watermark on a paper order; making a video)'' If I could leave you with one thought, remember... it wasn't me. They're trying to make me an [[{{Malaproper}} escape goat]]. If I am fired, I swear to God, that every single piece of copier paper in this town is going to have [[PrecisionFStrike the F-word]] on it. The F-word. You have one day.
-->'''Pam:''' One day for what?
-->'''Michael:''' [[ComicallyMissingThePoint That's...they always give an ultimatum.]]
-->'''Pam:''' ...OK.

to:

-->'''Michael:''' ''(being blamed for an obscene watermark on a paper order; making a video)'' If I could leave you with one thought, remember... it wasn't me. They're trying to make me an [[{{Malaproper}} escape goat]]. If I am fired, I swear to God, that every single piece of copier paper in this town is going to have [[PrecisionFStrike the F-word]] on it. The F-word. You have one day.
-->'''Pam:'''
day.\\
'''Pam:'''
One day for what?
-->'''Michael:'''
what?\\
'''Michael:'''
[[ComicallyMissingThePoint That's...they always give an ultimatum.]]
-->'''Pam:''' ...OK.
]]\\
'''Pam:''' ...OK.
%%* On ''Series/PrisonBreak'', they're usually racing against a season-long clock and a tinier clock in a number of episodes.
* On ''Series/QuincyME'', Quincy once promised to get back to a committee within 36 hours. Queried by an assistant, he declared himself tired of the usual 48.
* ''Series/RobinHood'' features an episode where the Sheriff goes missing, and must be found by sunset or Nottingham will be destroyed.
* Most episodes of ''{{Series/Scorpion}}'' involve a Ticking Clock for the mostly-genius cast to race against. Examples include an incoming tsunami, a plane flying during a blackout, and a [[MakesSenseInContext particle collider warming up to make a black hole]].



-->'''Laverne:''' You have ''one day'' to get us another gorgeous Irishman.
-->'''[[HandsomeLech The Todd]]:''' ''One day.'' ''(off JD's and Turk's looks)'' What? [[AnythingThatMoves The Todd appreciates hot, regardless of gender.]]
* ''Series/TheCollector'' has standardized [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the Devil]]: For a period of ten years the client gets what he asked for. In the last 48 hours, the benefits of the deal (and sometimes other effects) will gradually disappear, and at their end his soul would be taken. Typically that's when the local debt collector would find him and give him a chance to go early. Almost every episode, the protagonist Morgan is allowed to help a client in his last 48 hours find redemption and be freed of his deal; once he makes contact with him, the countdown starts in his [[PostModernMagik collector's cellphone]], which zeroes on success. In "The Yogi," the title character {{lampshades}} how artificial the round numbers seem.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'' starring David Tennant had an episode titled "42", which of course gave the Doctor exactly 42-minutes to solve the present crisis with the story playing out in real-time. Similarly, in Matt Smith's debut story "The Eleventh Hour" the Doctor is given 20-minutes to prevent the destruction of the earth, again with that portion of the story occurring more or less in real-time.

to:

-->'''Laverne:''' You have ''one day'' to get us another gorgeous Irishman.
-->'''[[HandsomeLech
Irishman.\\
'''[[HandsomeLech
The Todd]]:''' ''One day.'' ''(off JD's and Turk's looks)'' What? [[AnythingThatMoves The Todd appreciates hot, regardless of gender.]]
* ''Series/TheCollector'' has standardized [[DealWithTheDevil deals with %%* In ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'', almost the Devil]]: For a period entirety of ten years the client gets what he asked for. In the last 48 hours, the benefits of the deal (and sometimes other effects) will gradually disappear, and at their end his soul would be taken. Typically that's when the local debt collector would find him and give him a chance to go early. Almost every episode, the protagonist Morgan ''The Great Game'' is allowed to help a client in his last 48 hours find redemption and be freed of his deal; once he makes contact with him, the countdown starts in his [[PostModernMagik collector's cellphone]], which zeroes on success. In "The Yogi," the title character {{lampshades}} how artificial the round numbers seem.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'' starring David Tennant had an episode titled "42", which of course gave the Doctor exactly 42-minutes to solve the present crisis with the story playing out in real-time. Similarly, in Matt Smith's debut story "The Eleventh Hour" the Doctor is given 20-minutes to prevent the destruction of the earth, again with that portion of the story occurring more or less in real-time.
one big Race Against The Clock.



* ''Series/TwentyFour'' repeatedly, but it is usually more like two hours.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** The episode "48 Hours", wherein a member of SG-1 [[TeleporterAccident gets trapped in the Stargate's data buffer]] and Stargate Command shuts down operations to avoid overwriting that buffer. The rest of the team is given 48 hours to investigate the matter before normal Stargate operations resume.
** On another occasion, Ba'al demands that Stargate Command hand over a prisoner within one day. O'Neill mocks the trope by asking if Ba'al means one ''Earth'' day. Ba'al just rolls his eyes and terminates the transmission.
** Lampshaded in the troperiffic 200th episode when the CloudCuckooLander movie producer takes a sarcastic comment about having a ticking clock on the screen seriously.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' also has "38 Minutes", in which a puddlejumper gets stuck in a Stargate, and 38 minutes is the normal amount of time before the gate shuts down of its own accord, destroying anything that hasn't made it all the way through.
** This is a key aspect of the premise of ''Series/StargateUniverse'' - the main cast does not have full control of the ''[[CoolStarship Destiny]]'', and it only stops at a given location for a few hours at a time before jumping back into [[FasterThanLightTravel FTL]]. Anyone not on board the ship at this time is left behind.
* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'': A radio game offered Peggy a prize if she got Al to return home that day for a nooner (sex anytime within the first hour after noon).
* On ''Series/QuincyME'', Quincy once promised to get back to a committee within 36 hours. Queried by an assistant, he declared himself tired of the usual 48.
* In the ''Series/CasesOfTheFirstDepartment'' episode "48 Hours", Capt. Martin Prazak arrests a suspect even though he was instructed only to follow him and find out his identity. However, Prazak knew that he was about to attack his next victim, a frail old guy who has just collected his monthly pension from the post office. The suspect has no ID and refuses to speak. His fingerprints are not in the Czech database. They can hold him only for two days without telling him the charges and they have in fact less than 48 hours because they lost some time in transporting him to the station and they have to prepare his release with a public prosecutor in advance. Their only lead is a train ticket from Kladno to Prague and the fact that he might be a foreigner from eastern Europe as he "might have hissed something in Russian or Slovak" when he was being arrested.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Defiance," the daughter of a foreign diplomat is kidnapped from NCIS custody, and Vance gives Gibbs' team 48 hours to find her before demanding [=DiNozzo=]'s and [=McGee=]'s badges.
** Lampshaded once, a group of marines in a training exercise find an armed bomb with about 3 minutes left on the clock. 10 seconds later the bomb goes off and the Gunnery Sgt. reminds them of Evil Overlord Rule #15: Never assume a bomb's timer is accurate.
* ''Series/TheEqualizer''.
** As part of his usual MindScrew tactics, Robert [=McCall=] gives a crime boss 24 hours to shut down his organisation or die. The man laughs this off, but finds himself subject to various other harassment tactics, including [=McCall=] ringing up to remind him how many hours he has left.
** In "No Conscience", an innocent bystander is [[MistakenForSpies Mistaken For A Spy]] and tortured for the MacGuffin. Realising he's going to be killed if he doesn't think of something, he comes up with the 48 hour trope himself. The villains give him 24 hours, but eventually agree to 36. Then he has to hire [=McCall=] (who points out that 12 hours have already passed by the time they interview their first witness) to find out what they wanted in the first place.
* In the ''Series/BrooklynNineNine'' episode "48 Hours", after making an arrest with too little proof, Detective Jake Peralta has 48 hours to get the evidence or the perp goes free, forcing the Nine-nine to work over the weekend.
-->'''Captain Holt:''' Detective Peralta has made a collar in the jewelry store heist. He didn't get sufficient evidence to make it stick, so we the next have 48 hours to fix his mistake.
* A similar plot happened in ''Series/TheBill'' because Reg Hollis was dumb enough to ask a prisoner a question pertinent to their inquires while he was being detained, so everyone suddenly has a lot less time than expected to get the required evidence or release him.
* Most episodes of {{Series/Scorpion}} involve a Ticking Clock for the mostly-genius cast to race against. Examples include an incoming tsunami, a plane flying during a blackout, and a [[MakesSenseInContext particle collider warming up to make a Black Hole]].
* ''Series/WithoutATrace''. As a veteran agent tells a rookie in the first episode, "Usually, after 48 hours, they're (the victim's) gone." From the moment the victim disappears and throughout the episode, the viewer is given a time stamp of how long they've been missing--ranging from 27 minutes to 4 days--to heighten the sense of urgency and the need to find them. This is explicitly cited in an episode where the VictimOfTheWeek is found dead and an agent blasts his supervisor for pulling him off the case to focus on another one—"Twenty minutes. [[MissedHimByThatMuch I missed her]] by ''twenty minutes''. I wanted you to know that." Several other episodes make things even more urgent, with one victim needing to be found in time to stop an execution and others needing to be found because of medical issues.
* ''Series/MidnightCaller'': In "Baby Chase," a woman kidnaps a diabetic baby who has only a few days to live without insulin. The kidnapper makes the time limit even shorter by feeding her sugary formula. By the time she's finally rescued, she's on the verge of a coma.
* ''Series/TheGreatestAmericanHero:'' In "Operation: Spoilsport", Ralph and Bill are informed by the supersuit-bestowing aliens that within a couple of days, the eponymous secret government protocol will be maliciously activated, setting off World War III.

to:

* ''Series/TwentyFour'' repeatedly, but it is usually more like two hours.
*
''Franchise/{{Stargate|Verse}}'':
**
''Series/StargateSG1'':
** The episode *** "48 Hours", wherein a member of SG-1 [[TeleporterAccident gets trapped in the Stargate's data buffer]] and Stargate Command shuts down operations to avoid overwriting that buffer. The rest of the team is given 48 hours to investigate the matter before normal Stargate operations resume.
** *** On another occasion, Ba'al demands that Stargate Command hand over a prisoner within one day. O'Neill mocks the trope by asking if Ba'al means one ''Earth'' day. Ba'al just rolls his eyes and terminates the transmission.
** *** Lampshaded in the troperiffic 200th episode when the CloudCuckooLander {{Cloudcuckoolander}} movie producer takes a sarcastic comment about having a ticking clock on the screen seriously.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' also has "38 Minutes", in which a puddlejumper puddle jumper gets stuck in a Stargate, and 38 minutes is the normal amount of time before the gate shuts down of its own accord, destroying anything that hasn't made it all the way through.
** This is a key aspect of the premise of ''Series/StargateUniverse'' - the main cast does not have full control of the ''[[CoolStarship Destiny]]'', and it only stops at a given location for a few hours at a time before jumping back into [[FasterThanLightTravel FTL]]. Anyone not on board the ship at this time is left behind.
* ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'': A radio game offered Peggy a prize if she got Al to return home that day for a nooner (sex anytime within Inverted in ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek: TOS]]'' where the first hour after noon).
* On ''Series/QuincyME'', Quincy once promised to get back to a committee within 36 hours. Queried by an assistant, he declared himself tired of
good guys essentially gave the usual 48.
* In
bad guys an ultimatum; "Back off or we blow ourselves -- and you -- to smithereens" and then start the ''Series/CasesOfTheFirstDepartment'' clock ticking.
** This returns in every Star Trek series. Threatening to self-destruct seems to be a fairly common tactic among Starfleet captains.
* An
episode "48 Hours", Capt. Martin Prazak arrests a suspect even though he was instructed towards the end of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' played on the same premise: only to follow him in this case the subject of this mind trip was dy''ing'' and find out his identity. However, Prazak knew that Bashir and O'Brien had to extract vital information on an antidote before he was about to attack his next victim, died.
* ''Series/{{Stitchers}}'': "Stitching" (inserting
a frail old guy who has just collected his monthly pension from living person's consciousness into the post office. The suspect has no ID and refuses to speak. His fingerprints are not in the Czech database. They can hold him memories of a deceased person) is inherently one of these, since there's only for two days without telling him a short time before the charges and they have deceased brain loses viability.
* An episode of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' features "ghost sickness", which kills its victims
in fact less than 48 hours because they lost some time in transporting him to the station and they have to prepare his release with a public prosecutor in advance. Their only lead is a train ticket from Kladno to Prague and the fact that he might be a foreigner from eastern Europe as he "might have hissed something in Russian or Slovak" when he was being arrested.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Defiance," the daughter of a foreign diplomat is kidnapped from NCIS custody, and Vance gives Gibbs' team 48 hours to find her before demanding [=DiNozzo=]'s and [=McGee=]'s badges.
** Lampshaded once, a group of marines in a training exercise find an armed bomb with about 3 minutes left on the clock. 10 seconds later the bomb goes off and the Gunnery Sgt. reminds them of Evil Overlord Rule #15: Never assume a bomb's timer is accurate.
* ''Series/TheEqualizer''.
** As part of his usual MindScrew tactics, Robert [=McCall=] gives a crime boss 24 hours to shut down his organisation or die. The man laughs this off, but finds himself subject to various other harassment tactics, including [=McCall=] ringing up to remind him how many hours he has left.
** In "No Conscience", an innocent bystander is [[MistakenForSpies Mistaken For A Spy]] and tortured for the MacGuffin. Realising he's going to be killed if he doesn't think of something, he comes up with the 48 hour trope himself. The villains give him 24 hours, but eventually agree to 36. Then he has to hire [=McCall=] (who points out that 12 hours have already passed by the time they interview their first witness) to find out what they wanted in the first place.
* In the ''Series/BrooklynNineNine'' episode "48 Hours",
after making an arrest with too little proof, Detective Jake Peralta has 48 hours causing them to get the evidence or the perp goes free, forcing the Nine-nine to work over the weekend.
-->'''Captain Holt:''' Detective Peralta has made a collar in the jewelry store heist. He didn't get sufficient evidence to make it stick, so we the next have 48 hours to fix his mistake.
* A similar plot happened in ''Series/TheBill'' because Reg Hollis was dumb enough to ask a prisoner a question pertinent to their inquires while he was being detained, so everyone suddenly has a lot less time than expected to get the required evidence or release him.
* Most episodes of {{Series/Scorpion}} involve a Ticking Clock for the mostly-genius cast to race against. Examples include an incoming tsunami, a plane flying during a blackout, and a [[MakesSenseInContext particle collider warming up to make a Black Hole]].
fear everything. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpKgqwugHjA Like cats.]]
* ''Series/WithoutATrace''. As a veteran agent tells a rookie in the first episode, "Usually, after 48 hours, they're (the victim's) gone." From the moment the victim disappears and throughout the episode, the viewer is given a time stamp of how long they've been missing--ranging from 27 minutes to 4 days--to heighten the sense of urgency and the need to find them. This is explicitly cited in an episode where the VictimOfTheWeek is found dead and an agent blasts his supervisor for pulling him off the case to focus on another one—"Twenty minutes. [[MissedHimByThatMuch I missed her]] by ''twenty minutes''. I wanted you to know that." Several other episodes make things even more urgent, with one victim needing to be found in time to stop an execution and others needing to be found because of medical issues.
issues.
* ''Series/MidnightCaller'': ''Series/TheXFiles''
** "731": Mulder doesn't have much time to separate a boxcar with an alien-human hybrid (or was it?) and a time bomb from the rest of the train. He also needs to find out the code to open the sealed door of the aforementioned boxcar.
**
In "Baby Chase," a woman kidnaps a diabetic baby "S.R.819" Mulder and Scully have one day to find out who has only poisoned Skinner and they need to find a few cure as well.
** "Beyond the Sea": The FBI and police have five
days to live without insulin. The kidnapper makes the time limit even shorter by feeding her sugary formula. By the time she's finally rescued, she's on the verge find a pair of a coma.
* ''Series/TheGreatestAmericanHero:'' In "Operation: Spoilsport", Ralph
kidnapped teenagers who are tortured and Bill are informed by the supersuit-bestowing aliens that within a couple of days, the eponymous secret government protocol will be maliciously activated, setting off World War III.
found dead if the offender is not caught.
--->'''Scully:''' That's a grim deadline.


* ''Series/WithoutATrace''. As a veteran agent tells a rookie in the first episode, "Usually, after 48 hours, they're (the victim's) gone." From the moment the victim disappears and throughout the episode, the viewer is given a time stamp of how long they've been missing to heighten the sense of urgency and the need to find them. This is explicitly cited in an episode where the VictimOfTheWeek is found dead and an agent blasts his supervisor for pulling him off the case to focus on another one—"Twenty minutes. I missed her by ''twenty minutes''. I wanted you to know that." Several other episodes make things even more urgent, with one victim needing to be found in time to stop an execution and others needing to be found because of medical issues.

to:

* ''Series/WithoutATrace''. As a veteran agent tells a rookie in the first episode, "Usually, after 48 hours, they're (the victim's) gone." From the moment the victim disappears and throughout the episode, the viewer is given a time stamp of how long they've been missing missing--ranging from 27 minutes to 4 days--to heighten the sense of urgency and the need to find them. This is explicitly cited in an episode where the VictimOfTheWeek is found dead and an agent blasts his supervisor for pulling him off the case to focus on another one—"Twenty minutes. [[MissedHimByThatMuch I missed her her]] by ''twenty minutes''. I wanted you to know that." Several other episodes make things even more urgent, with one victim needing to be found in time to stop an execution and others needing to be found because of medical issues.

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/{{Shatterbelt}}'', by the time Tracy figures out what her premonitions have been warning her about, she has just half an hour to act. She manages to save the visitors to Mr. Bailey's mine and the people in St. Bernard's Park before the earthquake hits.

Added DiffLines:

** The heroes, conversely, have a Race Against The ''Thermometer'': if they don't defeat Thrax before Frank's core body temperature hits lethal levels, the entire "city" of sentient cells dies.


* [[Creator/{{Epyx}} Automated Simulations']] ''Rescue at Rigel''. "Sudden" Smith has 60 minutes to rescue 10 captives from an asteroid. The current time (counting up from 1) is always on the screen. Then, after it became Epyx, it released the hit ''VideoGames/ImpossibleMission'', which was both this and TimedMission.

to:

* [[Creator/{{Epyx}} Automated Simulations']] ''Rescue at Rigel''. "Sudden" Smith has 60 minutes to rescue 10 captives from an asteroid. The current time (counting up from 1) is always on the screen. Then, after it became Epyx, it released the hit ''VideoGames/ImpossibleMission'', ''VideoGame/ImpossibleMission'', which was both this and TimedMission.


* ''Series/GreatestAmericanHero:'' In "Operation: Spoilsport", Ralph and Bill are informed by the supersuit-bestowing aliens that within a couple of days, the eponymous secret government protocol will be maliciously activated, setting off World War III.

to:

* ''Series/GreatestAmericanHero:'' ''Series/TheGreatestAmericanHero:'' In "Operation: Spoilsport", Ralph and Bill are informed by the supersuit-bestowing aliens that within a couple of days, the eponymous secret government protocol will be maliciously activated, setting off World War III.



to:

* ''Series/GreatestAmericanHero:'' In "Operation: Spoilsport", Ralph and Bill are informed by the supersuit-bestowing aliens that within a couple of days, the eponymous secret government protocol will be maliciously activated, setting off World War III.

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