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->''Nintendo taught me it's okay to be self-conscious about my appearance since they obviously were with the [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]] after changing it like 12 times.''

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->''Nintendo ->''"Nintendo taught me it's okay to be self-conscious about my appearance since they obviously were with the [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]] 3DS after changing it like 12 times.''"''


* The UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast received a limited-edition black "SEGA Sports" model that came prepackaged with two games, and another model, the Diver 2000 CX-1, could best be described as a CRT television with a Dreamcast built into it (and it was designed to look like [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic's head]]!). Other than the latter two models, there was also an internal revision which dropped support for the MIL-CD format, which never saw use outside of Japan besides pirate and homebrew releases.

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* The UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast received didn't live long enough to have any real redesigns, but it did receive a limited-edition black "SEGA Sports" model that came prepackaged with two games, and another model, the Diver 2000 CX-1, could best be described as a CRT television with a Dreamcast built into it (and it was designed to look like [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic's head]]!). Other than the latter two models, there was also an internal revision which dropped support for the MIL-CD format, which never saw use outside of Japan besides pirate and homebrew releases. There was also the [[http://www.thedreamcastjunkyard.co.uk/2015/07/stars-spangled-box-art.html change of packaging design for North America]] about midway through the console's lifespan (which also included a redesign for the GD-ROM jewel cases, going from white to black).


* The [[Literature/AmericanGirlsCollection American Girl]] dolls received a number of outfit changes both with the Historical and contemporary lineup. While refreshed meet outfits for the Truly Me dolls are to be expected to align with contemporary children's fashions, the most infamous of these is the [=BeForever=] reboot which changed the historical dolls' wardrobes in hopes that they would appeal more to current tastes, which was released to mixed reception at worst, with some fans complaining that they look either too anachronistic or gaudy.

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* The [[Literature/AmericanGirlsCollection American Girl]] dolls received a number of outfit changes both with the Historical and contemporary lineup. While refreshed meet outfits for the Truly Me dolls are to be expected to align with contemporary children's fashions, the most infamous of these is the [=BeForever=] reboot which reboot--which changed the historical dolls' wardrobes in hopes that they would appeal more to current tastes, which was tastes--was released to mixed reception at worst, with some fans complaining that they look either too anachronistic or gaudy.gaudy for the characters' respective time periods. American Girl would later downplay the [=BeForever=] branding and revert to the old Historical moniker likely due to fan feedback.

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* Similar to the Lada example, the second-generation Mitsubishi Delica is still produced and sold in Indonesia and the Philippines to its day, where it is marketed as a utility or business fleet vehicle. It did receive some modest updates like a more rounded fascia, and in the Philippines, a Euro 4-compliant diesel engine (with the ride hight brought up somewhat to account for the newer powerplant, but is otherwise essentially identical to the model first introduced in 1979.


* Creator/LeapFrog has done this with the [=LeapFrog=] Epic, having released variants of the Android-powered educational tablet such as the Academy Edition and the [=LeapPad=] Academy, all of which were essentially identical to the base Epic save for a different silicone bumper and the Academy programme being bundled with the later edition tablets.

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* Creator/LeapFrog Franchise/LeapFrog has done this with the [=LeapFrog=] Epic, having released variants of the Android-powered educational tablet such as the Academy Edition and the [=LeapPad=] Academy, all of which were essentially identical to the base Epic save for a different silicone bumper and the Academy programme being bundled with the later edition tablets.


** The Master System would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. This model featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the card slot (making it incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF was supported).
* The [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Mega Drive/Genesis]] underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. After the original model, there was the first redesign in 1993, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold as the Genesis Core System (without the Sega prefix) in North America. It lacked the headphone jack and volume slider that was on front of the original model, as well as the DE-9 port of the back (which only the Japan-only Mega Modem add-on ended up supporting). The Genesis 3 was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even more compact design due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.

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** The Master System would be relaunched as well in North America and Europe in 1990 with a budget-priced model known as the Master System II. This model featured a more compact design, but at the expense of a lot of features from the original such as the (admittedly unused) expansion port, the card slot (making it incompatible with Sega Card games and the aforementioned [=3D=] glasses) and support for A/V output (only RF was supported).
* The [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Mega Drive/Genesis]] underwent through three basic designs, not counting the various minor revisions and later consoles-on-a-chip. After the original model, there was the first redesign in 1993, known as the Mega Drive 2 in Japan and Europe and sold as the Genesis Core System (without the Sega prefix) in North America. It lacked the headphone jack and volume slider that was on front of the original model, as well as the DE-9 port of the back (which only the Japan-only Mega Modem add-on ended up supporting).supporting; later runs of the Model 1 had already omitted the port anyway). The Genesis 3 was released in 1997 exclusively in North America as a budget console by Majesco and has an even more compact design due to the removal of the expansion port and simplified internal components. Unfortunately this made the Genesis 3 incompatible with the Power Base Converter, Sega CD and [=32X=] add-ons, as well as certain games such as ''Virtua Racing'' and ''Gargoyles''.


* The UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn had two main models released: the launch HST-3200 model featured oval-shaped power and reset buttons along [=LEDs=] for power and access, while the HST-3220 model released in 1996 removed the [=LEDs=] and replaced the oval power and reset buttons into round ones. In Japan these two models were distinguished by the color of their cases: the Model 1 consoles have gray casing with blue power/reset/eject buttons, while the Model 2 consoles have white casing with a red eject button and gray power/reset buttons. The standard-issue controller was also recolored to match the consoles, with the Model 2 controller having the ABC buttons now colored green, yellow and blue (the shoulder buttons and the start button were red). In the U.S. and Europe, Sega made no distinction between the two models, having released both of them in black casing, although the Model 2 consoles in the west did come with a black version of the Japanese-style controller instead of the crappily-redesigned U.S. controller.

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* The UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn had two main models released: the launch HST-3200 model featured oval-shaped power and reset buttons along [=LEDs=] for power and access, while the HST-3220 model released in 1996 removed the [=LEDs=] and replaced the oval power and reset buttons into round ones. In Japan these two models were distinguished by the color of their cases: the Model 1 consoles have gray casing with blue power/reset/eject buttons, while the Model 2 consoles have white casing with a red eject button and gray power/reset buttons. The standard-issue controller was also recolored to match the consoles, with the Model 2 controller having the ABC buttons now colored green, yellow and blue (the shoulder buttons and the start button were red). In the U.S. and Europe, Sega made no distinction between the two models, having released both of them in black casing, although the Model 2 consoles in the west did come with a black version of the Japanese-style controller instead of the crappily-redesigned original redesigned U.S. controller.


* Pictured above is the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem NES]] [[FanNickname top loader]] (aka the NES-101 model) released in 1993 (a few years after the Super NES was already launched), which converted the console from a front-loading VCR-like design to a more conventional top-loading design and came packaged with a redesigned version of the controller (NES-039) that more closely resemble its Super NES counterpart (hence the dogbone nickname) rather than the original's rectangular design. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light" problem caused by bent connector pins. However, a manufacturing error caused most units of the remodeled NES to ship with faulty video output that causes faint vertical lines (or jailbars) to always appear on-screen. On top of that, this new unit only accepted video output via RF modulation, as it lacked the RCA output jacks from the original NES-001 model. Nintendo produced a revised version of the top-loader that fixed the jailbar effect with a new motherboard and replaced the RF output with the same multi-AV port used by the Super NES, but this revision was only distributed as a replacement unit to consumers who shipped their faulty top loaders to Nintendo for repairs, making it sought-after among collectors.

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* Pictured above is the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem NES]] [[FanNickname top loader]] (aka the NES-101 model) released in 1993 (a few years after the Super NES was already launched), which converted the console from a front-loading VCR-like design to a more conventional top-loading design and came packaged with a redesigned version of the controller (NES-039) that more closely resemble its Super NES counterpart (hence the dogbone nickname) rather than the original's rectangular design. The top-loading design made the cartridge insertion much more robust, cutting down on the old "flashing light" problem caused by bent connector pins. However, a manufacturing error caused most units of the remodeled NES to ship with faulty video output that causes faint vertical lines (or jailbars) to always appear on-screen. On top of that, this new unit only accepted video output via RF modulation, as it lacked the RCA output jacks from the original NES-001 model. Nintendo produced a revised version of the top-loader that fixed the jailbar effect with a new motherboard and replaced the RF output with the same multi-AV port used by the Super NES, NES (and later by the N64 and [=GameCube=], but this revision was only distributed as a replacement unit to consumers who shipped their faulty top loaders to Nintendo for repairs, making it sought-after among collectors.



** Years before the release of the New Famicom in 1993, Sharp released a series of officially-licensed Famicom-compatible devices in Japan such as the Sharp [=C1=] in 1983 (a TV monitor with built-in Famicom console), the Twin Famicom in 1986 (a Famicom console with a built-in Disk System that already featured composite video output via RCA jacks) and the Famicom Titler in 1989 (a Famicom console designed specifically for editing gameplay footage and offered S-video output). Sharp also a released a TV set with built-in NES control deck for the U.S. market known as the Game Television.
* The [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] would get a compact redesign of its own in 1997 known as the SNS-101 model. Besides its smaller design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up supporting) and the fact that the SNS-101 has no support for S-Video and RGB output (at least not without internal modding). This model was released as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan (or model number SHVC-101). Both versions of the console came with a slightly revised version of the SFC/SNES controller that removed the console's logo on the front in favor of a plain Nintendo logo in an attempt to give the controller a more region-neutral design (despite this, the shapes and colors of the ABXY buttons still differed with the US-released controllers).

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** Years before the release of the New Famicom in 1993, Sharp released a series of officially-licensed Famicom-compatible devices in Japan such as the Sharp [=C1=] in 1983 (a TV monitor with built-in Famicom console), the Twin Famicom in 1986 (a Famicom console with a built-in Disk System that already featured composite video output via RCA jacks) and the Famicom Titler in 1989 (a Famicom console designed specifically for editing gameplay footage and offered S-video output). Sharp also a released a TV set with built-in NES control deck for the U.S. market known as the Game Television.
Television in 1989.
* The [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] would get a compact redesign of its own in 1997 known as the SNS-101 model.model (also referred to as the "New-Style Super NES"). Besides its smaller design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up supporting) and the fact that the SNS-101 has no support for S-Video and RGB output (at least not without internal modding). This model was released as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan (or model number SHVC-101). Both versions of the console came with a slightly revised version of the SFC/SNES controller that removed the console's logo on the front in favor of a plain Nintendo logo in an attempt to give the controller a more region-neutral design (despite this, the shapes and colors of the ABXY buttons still differed with the US-released controllers).



* The [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console launched in 1983, was itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer launched at the same time. The main difference between the two is that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware are essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 can be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1100 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and programming software as the SC-3000 in addition to game catridges. A second model of the console was released in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II), which replaced the hardwired joystick with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads that can be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III (a.k.a. the SG-1000 [=M3=]), which is improved upon the SG-1000's specifications by adding an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot (for Sega [=MyCard=] games that required the [=CardCatcher=] adapter on prior models). The Sega Mark III would go on to serve as the basis for the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Master System]] in 1986, Sega's first game console in the west.
** Incidentally the Master System would be released in Japan as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III in 1987. However, this Japanese version of the console differs from the earlier western models by replacing the reset button on the power base with a turbo fire switch (which eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause, a much welcomed benefit) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=3D=] Glasses without the need of the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).

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* The [[UsefulNotes/OtherSegaSystems SG-1000]], Sega's very first game console launched in 1983, was itself a consolized version of their SC-3000 personal computer launched at the same time. The main difference between the two is that the SC-3000 has an integrated keyboard, while the SG-1000 has a hardwired Atari-style joystick. Otherwise, both hardware are essentially identical internally and the SG-1000 can be turned into a personal computer with the SK-1100 keyboard, allowing it to utilize the same peripherals and programming software as the SC-3000 in addition to game catridges.cartridges. A second model of the console was released in 1984 known as the SG-1000 II (a.k.a. the Mark II), which replaced the hardwired joystick with a pair of detachable Famicom-style joypads that can be stored on the side. The outer design of the SG-1000 II would end up being used (with slight changes) for Sega's succeeding console in 1985, the Sega Mark III (a.k.a. the SG-1000 [=M3=]), which is improved upon the SG-1000's specifications by adding an upgraded video processing unit and a built-in IC card slot (for Sega [=MyCard=] games that required the [=CardCatcher=] adapter on prior models). The Sega Mark III would go on to serve as the basis for the [[UsefulNotes/SegaMasterSystem Master System]] in 1986, Sega's first game console in the west.
** Incidentally In turn, the Master System would be released in Japan as a relaunched version of the Sega Mark III (referred to as the Mark IV internally) in 1987. However, this Japanese version of the console differs from the earlier western models by replacing the reset button on the power base with a turbo fire switch (which eliminated the possibility of accidentally resetting your game when trying to hit pause, a much welcomed benefit) and adding built-in support for the Sega [=SegaScope=] [=3D=] Glasses without the need of for the card slot adapter, as well as an integrated FM sound chip for games that supported it (which was sold separately as an upgrade module for the Mark III in Japan and never released in the west).



** In addition to the stand-alone Mega Drive/Genesis consoles, there were also a few hybrid models that have an integrated Mega CD/Sega CD unit, similar to the aforementioned Duo models of the PC Engine/[=TurboGrafx-16=]. The first of these hybrid consoles was the Wondermega, released exclusively in Japan in 1992 by both, Sega and JVC, with the Sega-branded version being the rarer of the two variants. The original Wondermega featured a built-in MIDI and microphone ports, allowing it to function as a MIDI synthesizer and as a karaoke machine as well. This was followed by the Wondermega [=M2=] in 1993, which featured a more compact design and removed the MIDI support, but still retained the karaoke functionality. This was the same model that was released in the U.S. as the [=X'Eye=] the same year. Afterward came the Sega-produced Genesis [=CDX=] (or Multi-Mega), released in North America and Europe in 1994, which lacks the karaoke support of the X'Eye, but has a much more compact design and an LED display, allowing it to function as a portable CD player. The last (and rarest) of these hybrid units, the Aiwa [=CSD-GM1=], released in limited quantities in 1994 in Japan, features an integrated an audio cassette player and functions as a portable radio.

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** In addition to the stand-alone Mega Drive/Genesis consoles, there were also a few hybrid models that have an integrated Mega CD/Sega CD unit, similar to the aforementioned Duo models of the PC Engine/[=TurboGrafx-16=]. The first of these hybrid consoles was the Wondermega, released exclusively in Japan in 1992 by both, both Sega and JVC, with the Sega-branded version being the rarer of the two variants. The original Wondermega featured a built-in MIDI and microphone ports, allowing it to function as a MIDI synthesizer and as a karaoke machine as well. This was followed by the Wondermega [=M2=] in 1993, which featured a more compact design and removed the MIDI support, but still retained the karaoke functionality. This was the same model that was released in the U.S. as the [=X'Eye=] the same year. Afterward came the Sega-produced Genesis [=CDX=] (or Multi-Mega), released in North America and Europe in 1994, which lacks the karaoke support of the X'Eye, but has a much more compact design and an LED display, allowing it to function as a portable CD player. The last (and rarest) of these hybrid units, the Aiwa [=CSD-GM1=], released in limited quantities in 1994 in Japan, features an integrated an audio cassette player and functions as a portable radio.


** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players with its spaceship-like design and unique variant of the [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design and an expansion port for CD-ROM support).

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** It got not one, not two, but three redesigns in 1989. The first one, the PC Engine [=CoreGrafx=], was essentially a recolored version of the original white PC Engine, but with the RF output replaced with composite A/V. The second model, the PC Engine Shuttle, was marketed towards younger players with its spaceship-like design and unique variant of the [=TurboPad=] controller, but lacked the CD-ROM expansion port in order to reduce cost. The third and last of these models was the PC Engine [=SuperGrafx=], which featured an extra video chip and more RAM. The [=SuperGrafx=] was intended to be a premium model meant to run exclusive games in addition to standard [=HuCards=] (similar to the later [=PS4=] Pro), but because the hardware advantage offered by the [=SuperGrafx=] was not significant enough to make much of a difference in performance, only a handful of [=SuperGrafx=]-specific games were produced (most notably a port of Capcom's ''[[VideoGame/GhostsAndGoblins ''[[VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins Ghouls 'n Ghosts]]'') and many games that were planned for it were ultimately released as regular [=HuCards=] or [=CD-ROMs=]. Later variations of the console include the [=CoreGrafx II=] (a recolored version of the original [=CoreGrafx=]), the PC Engine GT (a handheld version released as the Turbo Express in the U.S.) and the PC Engine LT (another handheld variant, but with a laptop-inspired design and an expansion port for CD-ROM support).


* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models following the launch [=CECHA00=] model upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some users didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, USB ports, among others.
** The CECH-2000 series was eventually launched in 2009, which featured a smaller form factor (hence the "[=PS3=] Slim" nickname) and added support for Dolby [=TrueHD=] and DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreaming, as well as synchronization with BRAVIA TV sets with the XMB. However, support for [=PS2=] discs was dropped though, with backwards compatibility limited to downloadable games available on the PS Store (Super Audio CD compatibility had already been dropped with the third and final generation of the original "Fat" model). [=PS1=] disc support is still present, though, via software emulation. It most notably came along with a major brand redesign, moving the banner on the box art from the left edge to the top, changing the brand colours from red to blue and dropping the all-caps "PLAYSTATION 3" logo with the ''[[Film/SpiderMan1 Spider-Man]]''-style font in favor of an abbreviated [=PS3=] logo. These changes were intentionally reminiscent of the incredibly popular [=PlayStation=] 2, and all remain to this day.
** The CECH-4000 series was even smaller than the Slim models (hence the "Super Slim" nickname) and replaced the motorized disc drive in favour of a top loading design with a sliding disc cover. Some versions of the super slim (specifically the [=CECH-4XXXA=] models) feature [=12GB=] of flash memory instead of a hard drive as its default memory storage.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight. The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. The PSP Go (the [=N1000=] model) removed the UMD slot in order to reduce cost and push downloadable media, making it the first portable gaming console that does not use physical media. But after a couple years of lacklustre sales, the PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short. Another cost-reduced model that was exclusive to Europe, the PSP Street (the [=E1000=] model) took the opposite approach in the sense that it retained the UMD slot, but removed its Wi-Fi capabilities, making it a strictly offline device.

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* The UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} had numerous models. Successive models following the launch [=CECHA00=] model upgraded the hard drive capacity, but at the same time reduced some features that some users didn't take too kindly to. This affected backwards compatibility for [=PS2=] discs ([=PS1=] discs still work on all models), media card slots, and USB ports, among others.
** The CECH-2000 series was eventually launched in 2009, which featured a smaller form factor (hence the "[=PS3=] Slim" nickname) and added support for Dolby [=TrueHD=] and DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreaming, as well as HDMI-CEC synchronization (intended to be paired with Sony's BRAVIA TV sets sets, so their remotes could work with the XMB. [=PS3=]'s XMB). However, support for [=PS2=] discs was dropped though, dropped, with backwards compatibility limited to downloadable games available on the PS Store (Super Audio CD compatibility had already been dropped with the third and final generation of the original "Fat" model). [=PS1=] disc support is still present, though, via software emulation. It most notably came along with a major brand redesign, moving the banner on the box art from the left edge to the top, changing the brand colours colors from red to blue and dropping the all-caps "PLAYSTATION 3" logo with the ''[[Film/SpiderMan1 Spider-Man]]''-style font in favor of an abbreviated [=PS3=] logo. These changes were intentionally reminiscent of the incredibly popular [=PlayStation=] 2, and all remain to this day.
** The CECH-4000 series was even smaller than the Slim models (hence the "Super Slim" nickname) and replaced the motorized disc drive in favour favor of a top loading design with a sliding disc cover. Some versions of the super slim (specifically the [=CECH-4XXXA=] models) feature [=12GB=] of flash memory instead of a hard drive as its default memory storage.
* The UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable was redesigned as the PSP-2000 (aka the "Slim & Lite"), gaining a better screen and TV-Out capability along with losing some weight.weight and the IR port that was never officially used. The PSP-3000 was later announced, the main changes apparently being a better analog stick and a microphone for Skype. The PSP Go (the [=N1000=] model) removed the UMD slot in order to reduce cost and push downloadable media, making it the first portable gaming console that does not use physical media. But after a couple years of lacklustre sales, the PSP Go was finally discontinued in 2011. Sony did try to get into the mobile market with the Xperia Play, but that also fell short. Another cost-reduced model that was exclusive to Europe, the PSP Street (the [=E1000=] model) took the opposite approach in the sense that it retained the UMD slot, but removed its Wi-Fi capabilities, making it a strictly offline device.

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* The Roku line of streaming devices has undergone so many changes and renditions since 2008 it's impossible to keep track of it all. They keep shrinking the entry-level Express device to the point that it's ''smaller than the remote''; conversely, the top-of-the-line Roku Ultra has stayed at the same size and shape, roughly resembling a small plate, for the past couple years.


* The [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] would get a compact redesign of its own in 1997 known as the SNS-101 model. Besides its smaller design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up supporting) and the fact that the SNS-101 has no support for S-Video and RGB output (at least not without internal modding). This model was released as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan (or model number SHVC-101). Both versions of the console came with a slightly revised version of the SFC/SNES controller that removed the console's logo on the front in favor of a plain Nintendo logo in an attempt to give the controller a more region-neutral design (despite the fact that the shapes and colors of the ABXY buttons still differed between regions).

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* The [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]] would get a compact redesign of its own in 1997 known as the SNS-101 model. Besides its smaller design, the main differences between it and the original SNS-001 model was the removal of the expansion dock at the bottom of the console (which only the Japan-only BS-X Satellaview add-on ended up supporting) and the fact that the SNS-101 has no support for S-Video and RGB output (at least not without internal modding). This model was released as the Super Famicom Jr. in Japan (or model number SHVC-101). Both versions of the console came with a slightly revised version of the SFC/SNES controller that removed the console's logo on the front in favor of a plain Nintendo logo in an attempt to give the controller a more region-neutral design (despite the fact that this, the shapes and colors of the ABXY buttons still differed between regions).with the US-released controllers).


* The first model of the UsefulNotes/ThreeDOInteractiveMultiplayer was the FZ-1 model by Panasonic, also known as the [=3DO=] REAL, which retailed at $699 when it launched in 1993 due to the fact that the [=3DO=] System wasn't technically a Panasonic product - they simply had the technology licensed out from the The [=3DO=] Company, who wished to make it an industry standard in the same sense VHS was for movies. Despite the the fact that [=3DO=] standard failed to take the industry by storm, there were still quite a few versions put out by other licensees such as Sanyo's TRY model that was available only in Japan and Goldstar's ALIVE model. Panasonic eventually released a cost-reduced model known as the FZ-10 in 1995 in order to compete with the [=PlayStation=] and Sega Saturn, which replaced the front-loading tray with a top-loading one.

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* The first model While there were multiple [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDOInteractiveMultiplayer 3DO]] consoles made by different hardware manufacturers, as the concept behind the platform was to make it a licensable standard for videogame consoles in the same way that VHS tapes and DVD players were to home video, Creator/{{Panasonic}} was the only company to end up making two different models of the UsefulNotes/ThreeDOInteractiveMultiplayer was [=3DO=]. Their first model, the FZ-1 model by Panasonic, also known as the [=3DO=] REAL, which or [=3DO REAL=], retailed at $699 when it launched in 1993 due to the fact that the [=3DO=] System wasn't technically and had a front-loading disc tray. Panasonic product - they simply had the technology licensed out from the The [=3DO=] Company, who wished to make it an industry standard in the same sense VHS was for movies. Despite the the fact that [=3DO=] standard failed to take the industry by storm, there were still quite a few versions put out by other licensees such as Sanyo's TRY model that was available only in Japan and Goldstar's ALIVE model. Panasonic eventually released a cost-reduced the slimmer and more affordable FZ-10 model known as the FZ-10 in 1995 1995, which featured a top-loading disc tray, in order a last-ditch attempt to compete with against the newly-launched [=PlayStation=] and Sega Saturn, which replaced the front-loading tray with a top-loading one.Saturn consoles.


* The first model of the UsefulNotes/3DOInteractiveMultiplayer was the FZ-1 model by Panasonic, also known as the [=3DO=] REAL, which retailed at $699 when it launched in 1993 due to the fact that the [=3DO=] System wasn't technically a Panasonic product - they simply had the technology licensed out from the The [=3DO=] Company, who wished to make it an industry standard in the same sense VHS was for movies. Despite the the fact that [=3DO=] standard failed to take the industry by storm, there were still quite a few versions put out by other licensees such as Sanyo's TRY model that was available only in Japan and Goldstar's ALIVE model. Panasonic eventually released a cost-reduced model known as the FZ-10 in 1995 in order to compete with the [=PlayStation=] and Sega Saturn, which replaced the front-loading tray with a top-loading one.

to:

* The first model of the UsefulNotes/3DOInteractiveMultiplayer UsefulNotes/ThreeDOInteractiveMultiplayer was the FZ-1 model by Panasonic, also known as the [=3DO=] REAL, which retailed at $699 when it launched in 1993 due to the fact that the [=3DO=] System wasn't technically a Panasonic product - they simply had the technology licensed out from the The [=3DO=] Company, who wished to make it an industry standard in the same sense VHS was for movies. Despite the the fact that [=3DO=] standard failed to take the industry by storm, there were still quite a few versions put out by other licensees such as Sanyo's TRY model that was available only in Japan and Goldstar's ALIVE model. Panasonic eventually released a cost-reduced model known as the FZ-10 in 1995 in order to compete with the [=PlayStation=] and Sega Saturn, which replaced the front-loading tray with a top-loading one.


* The UsefulNotes/GameBoy was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket in 1996, which was smaller and proportionally thinner (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than four AA ones, and replaced the 2-inch greenscale screen with a slightly larger grayscale one. In 1998, the Game Boy Light came out [[NoExportForYou only in Japan]]; similar in design to the Pocket, this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on. The UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor, launched a few months later worldwide, lacked the backlight, but upgraded the hardware capabilities to allow colored graphics on par with the original NES (hence the name). Because the Color was designed to play its own exclusive cartridges in addition to standard and Color-enhanced cartridges, most people count it as its own platform, despite Nintendo officially marketing it as a revision and the internal hardware being not all that different from previous monochrome-only models.

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* The UsefulNotes/GameBoy was succeeded by the Game Boy Pocket in 1996, which was smaller and proportionally thinner (allowing it to more easily fit in pants pockets, hence the name), required two AAA batteries rather than four AA ones, and replaced the 2-inch greenscale screen with a slightly larger grayscale one. In 1998, the Game Boy Light came out [[NoExportForYou only in Japan]]; similar in design to the Pocket, this model featured a backlight for the first time. However, it required two AA batteries rather than two AAA ones and would have its runtime shortened by 40% with the backlight on. The UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor, launched a few months later worldwide, lacked the backlight, but upgraded the hardware capabilities to allow colored graphics on par with the original NES (hence the name). Because the Color was designed to play its own exclusive cartridges in addition to standard and Color-enhanced cartridges, most people count it as its own platform, despite Nintendo officially marketing classifying it as a revision (counting its sales numbers along with those of the previous Game Boy models) and the internal hardware being not all that different from previous monochrome-only models.

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