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* ''VideoGame/{{Suzerain}}'' (2020) is a text-based political RolePlayingGame putting you in the shoes of Anton Rayne -- a [[CharacterCustomization customizable]] newly-elected president of a fictional [[{{Ruritania}} quasi-Eastern European]] Republic of Sordland. Sordland is plagued by regional rivalries, aggressive neighbors, an economic recession, separatism, political violence, corruption, and, on top of all that, is caught up in cold war between two global superpowers vying for influence over it. The objective is to implement state policies that ensure the continued survival and prosperity of both the Republic ''and'' Anton Rayne.


* ''TabletopGame/{{SHASN}}'' [[note]]the [[UsefulNotes/IndianLanguages Sanskrit]] word for "governance, rule, regime" or "throne, seat of power"[[/note]] (TBR 2020) is a [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/zainmemon/shasn-the-political-strategy-board-game-break-ks/description Kickstarted]] board game, notable for being setting-agnostic, with the same mechanics applied to different time periods from UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic, through modern-day US and India, to TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture. It is a Campaign Sim and allows players to dynamically shift their ideology. On their turn, each player draws an "ideology card" with a setting-appropriate policy question, with their answer determining their ideological standing and which resources they receive. The game has four types of political capital (Funds, Media, Clout, and Trust) and four corresponding ideologies (Capitalist, Showman, Supremo, and Idealist). Resources can be used to secure votes in one of nine regions on the board, or to purchase Conspiracy and Headline cards to sabotage other players. Having certain levels in any ideology, meanwhile, unlocks powerful special abilities. The goal of the game is to secure majority votes in the most regions: when majority is formed in all nine regions, the game ends and the player with the most voters wins. Two unique twists are Coalitions and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerrymandering Gerrymandering]]: two players can form a Coalition to have a joint majority in a region, protecting their voters from others' Gerrymandering, which allows a player who has an individual majority in a region to arbitrarily shift voters (their own or the others'!) across all neighboring regions, unless they also form a majority (individual or coalition). Players can trade resources and Conspiracy cards at any time during their turn (also, players forming a coalition must exchange one card of their respective dominant ideologies, as the "ideological cost of compromise").

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* ''TabletopGame/{{SHASN}}'' [[note]]the [[UsefulNotes/IndianLanguages Sanskrit]] word for "governance, rule, regime" or "throne, seat of power"[[/note]] (TBR 2020) (2021) is a [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/zainmemon/shasn-the-political-strategy-board-game-break-ks/description Kickstarted]] board game, notable for being setting-agnostic, with the same mechanics applied to different time periods from UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic, through modern-day US and India, to TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture. It is a Campaign Sim and allows players to dynamically shift their ideology. On their turn, each player draws an "ideology card" with a setting-appropriate policy question, with their answer determining their ideological standing and which resources they receive. The game has four types of political capital (Funds, Media, Clout, and Trust) and four corresponding ideologies (Capitalist, Showman, Showstopper, Supremo, and Idealist). Resources can be used to secure votes in one of nine regions on the board, or to purchase Conspiracy and Headline cards to sabotage other players. Having certain levels in any ideology, meanwhile, unlocks powerful special abilities. The goal of the game is to secure majority votes in the most regions: when majority is formed in all nine regions, nine, the game ends and the player with the most majority voters wins. Two One unique twists are Coalitions and twist is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerrymandering Gerrymandering]]: two players can form a Coalition to have a joint majority in a region, protecting their voters from others' Gerrymandering, Gerrymandering]], which allows a player who has an individual majority the most voters in a region to arbitrarily shift voters (their own or the others'!) across all neighboring regions, unless they also form a majority (individual or coalition). regions. Players can trade resources and Conspiracy cards at any time during their turn (also, players forming a coalition must exchange one card of their respective dominant ideologies, as the "ideological cost of compromise").turn.


* ''TabletopGame/RepublicOfRome'' (1990) simulates the senatorial politics of the [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic pre-Imperial Rome]]. There are no hard-coded ideologies[[note]]unless players decide to role-play[[/note]], but any public promises and deals made by players are [[IGaveMyWord mechanically binding]]. Instead of a party, each player controls a faction of named senators, who also constitute their political capital. Each senator has two popular support ratings, Influence[[note]]how much sway he holds among fellow senators[[/note]] and Popularity[[note]]among the common folk of Rome[[/note]], as well as Oratory and Military ratings, with the most important being Influence[[note]]as the sum of it across all senators of a faction determines how close it is to victory[[/note]]. Other political capital includes [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attic_talent Talents]] (money, either belonging to senators, or to the faction), votes (see below), and loyalties of veteran legions (mainly for players who pull a [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Caesar]]). While there is a wargame dimension to ''ROR'', it is very formulaic and streamlined and serves mainly as a means for individual senators to gain popular support away from Rome. The heart of the game are the senate sessions, where players convert their senators' Oratory skill, loyal ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equites equites]]'', and talents into votes, which are then used to support or oppose proposals, such as senator appointments as consuls, provincial governors, and generals leading legions to wars[[note]]as well as how many legions they get to fight said wars with[[/note]]. Another important part of a senate session are the prosecutions, where a vote decides whether senators are fined or even executed for corruption or anything they did while in office on the previous turn (if convicted, a senator can try to use their Popularity to [[RabbleRouser rouse the rabble]] to his defense[[note]]this is the only time where Popularity is used proactively in the game[[/note]]). Interestingly, while there are "laws" in the game, which tweak its basic mechanics when played, they only need to be voted upon with optional rules, otherwise they take hold automatically. Lastly, at any time during a senate session, players can attempt to assassinate another's senator, though the punishment for it, if caught, is severe. The game ends when a) a senator pulls a Caesar and successfully [[MilitaryCoup takes Rome with his loyal veteran legions]], b) a senator gains 21 Influence and gets voted in as [[PresidentForLife Consul for Life]][[note]]this also happens automatically at 35 Influence[[/note]], c) the RandomEvent deck runs empty (in which case the faction with the most total Influence wins), or d) the republic collapses either because it is fighting too many wars simultaneously, can't pay for its expenses, or the civil unrest results in a revolution (in which case all players lose).

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* ''TabletopGame/RepublicOfRome'' ''TabletopGame/TheRepublicOfRome'' (1990) simulates the senatorial politics of the [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic pre-Imperial Rome]]. There are no hard-coded ideologies[[note]]unless players decide to role-play[[/note]], but any public promises and deals made by players are [[IGaveMyWord mechanically binding]]. Instead of a party, each player controls a faction of named senators, who also constitute their political capital. Each senator has two popular support ratings, Influence[[note]]how much sway he holds among fellow senators[[/note]] and Popularity[[note]]among the common folk of Rome[[/note]], as well as Oratory and Military ratings, with the most important being Influence[[note]]as the sum of it across all senators of a faction determines how close it is to victory[[/note]]. Other political capital includes [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attic_talent Talents]] (money, either belonging to senators, or to the faction), votes (see below), and loyalties of veteran legions (mainly for players who pull a [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Caesar]]). While there is a wargame dimension to ''ROR'', it is very formulaic and streamlined and serves mainly as a means for individual senators to gain popular support away from Rome. The heart of the game are the senate sessions, where players convert their senators' Oratory skill, loyal ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equites equites]]'', and talents into votes, which are then used to support or oppose proposals, such as senator appointments as consuls, provincial governors, and generals leading legions to wars[[note]]as well as how many legions they get to fight said wars with[[/note]]. Another important part of a senate session are the prosecutions, where a vote decides whether senators are fined or even executed for corruption or anything they did while in office on the previous turn (if convicted, a senator can try to use their Popularity to [[RabbleRouser rouse the rabble]] to his defense[[note]]this is the only time where Popularity is used proactively in the game[[/note]]). Interestingly, while there are "laws" in the game, which tweak its basic mechanics when played, they only need to be voted upon with optional rules, otherwise they take hold automatically. Lastly, at any time during a senate session, players can attempt to assassinate another's senator, though the punishment for it, if caught, is severe. The game ends when a) a senator pulls a Caesar and successfully [[MilitaryCoup takes Rome with his loyal veteran legions]], b) a senator gains 21 Influence and gets voted in as [[PresidentForLife Consul for Life]][[note]]this also happens automatically at 35 Influence[[/note]], c) the RandomEvent deck runs empty (in which case the faction with the most total Influence wins), or d) the republic collapses either because it is fighting too many wars simultaneously, can't pay for its expenses, or the civil unrest results in a revolution (in which case all players lose).


* ''Democratic Socialism Simulator'' (2019) turns the player into the first democratically elected socialist president of a WorldOfFunnyAnimals version of the United States (with a majority of Congress behind you and no Supreme Court issues to maintain RuleOfFun), and gives you a series of binary choices (and some random events) during which you try to maintain your electorate while trying to balance the budget, build socialism and try to reach the climate goals of your administration. Every choice will alienate some parts of the electorate and attract others, in addition to requiring set amounts of popular or congressional support.

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* ''Democratic Socialism Simulator'' ''VideoGame/DemocraticSocialismSimulator'' (2019) turns the player into the first democratically elected socialist president of a WorldOfFunnyAnimals version of the United States (with a majority of Congress behind you and no Supreme Court issues to maintain RuleOfFun), and gives you a series of binary choices (and some random events) during which you try to maintain your electorate while trying to balance the budget, build socialism and try to reach the climate goals of your administration. Every choice will alienate some parts of the electorate and attract others, in addition to requiring set amounts of popular or congressional support.


*
''VideoGame/PresidentElect'' (1981) is purely a U.S. presidential election simulator. It covers the period from 1960 to 1988 and allows a significant amount of customization.
*
''VideoGame/RepublicTheRevolution'' (2003) puts you in the shoes of a young activist from a fictional [[UsefulNotes/HoleInFlag post-Soviet]] [[{{Ruritania}} Eastern European]] [[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny republic]] who forms his own political party to topple the corrupt and reactionary government. To do so, he recruits additional activists from [[ClassAndLevelSystem all walks of life]] and assigns them (and himself) to carry out "actions" in the game world[[note]]which consists of three progressively larger cities, each subdivided into multiple districts[[/note]], e.g. investigating a city district (or spreading misinformation), campaigning for popular support of his cause (or sabotaging that of rival parties), or even attacking other parties' functionaries (or protecting his own). Having popular support in a district over time nets you different amounts of three types of political capital (Force, Influence, and Wealth), which correspond to three core ideologies[[note]]roughly: nationalist, social-democratic, and neoliberal, respectively[[/note]] and which you spend to launch actions, as well as story events[[note]]so for a specific action, you need both an activist who has the required ability and sufficient resources[[/note]]. The game has three [[AlignmentBasedEndings ideology-based endings]]: a MilitaryCoup (Force), a VelvetRevolution (Influence), or a forced resignation of the incumbent PresidentEvil, followed by his assassination (Wealth).

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*
* ''VideoGame/PresidentElect'' (1981) is a purely a U.S. presidential election simulator. It covers the period from 1960 to 1988 and allows a significant amount of customization.
*
* ''VideoGame/RepublicTheRevolution'' (2003) puts you in the shoes of a young activist from a fictional [[UsefulNotes/HoleInFlag post-Soviet]] [[{{Ruritania}} Eastern European]] [[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny republic]] who forms his own political party to topple the corrupt and reactionary government. To do so, he recruits additional activists from [[ClassAndLevelSystem all walks of life]] and assigns them (and himself) to carry out "actions" in the game world[[note]]which consists of three progressively larger cities, each subdivided into multiple districts[[/note]], e.g. investigating a city district (or spreading misinformation), campaigning for popular support of his cause (or sabotaging that of rival parties), or even attacking other parties' functionaries (or protecting his own). Having popular support in a district over time nets you different amounts of three types of political capital (Force, Influence, and Wealth), which correspond to three core ideologies[[note]]roughly: nationalist, social-democratic, and neoliberal, respectively[[/note]] and which you spend to launch actions, as well as story events[[note]]so for a specific action, you need both an activist who has the required ability and sufficient resources[[/note]]. The game has three [[AlignmentBasedEndings ideology-based endings]]: a MilitaryCoup (Force), a VelvetRevolution (Influence), or a forced resignation of the incumbent PresidentEvil, followed by his assassination (Wealth).


''Video Game/PresidentElect'' (1981) is purely a U.S. presidential election simulator. It covers the period from 1960 to 1988 and allows a significant amount of customization.

to:

''Video Game/PresidentElect'' ''VideoGame/PresidentElect'' (1981) is purely a U.S. presidential election simulator. It covers the period from 1960 to 1988 and allows a significant amount of customization.


* ''VideoGame/RepublicTheRevolution'' (2003) puts you in the shoes of a young activist from a fictional [[UsefulNotes/HoleInFlag post-Soviet]] [[{{Ruritania}} Eastern European]] [[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny republic]] who forms his own political party to topple the corrupt and reactionary government. To do so, he recruits additional activists from [[ClassAndLevelSystem all walks of life]] and assigns them (and himself) to carry out "actions" in the game world[[note]]which consists of three progressively larger cities, each subdivided into multiple districts[[/note]], e.g. investigating a city district (or spreading misinformation), campaigning for popular support of his cause (or sabotaging that of rival parties), or even attacking other parties' functionaries (or protecting his own). Having popular support in a district over time nets you different amounts of three types of political capital (Force, Influence, and Wealth), which correspond to three core ideologies[[note]]roughly: nationalist, social-democratic, and neoliberal, respectively[[/note]] and which you spend to launch actions, as well as story events[[note]]so for a specific action, you need both an activist who has the required ability and sufficient resources[[/note]]. The game has three [[AlignmentBasedEndings ideology-based endings]]: a MilitaryCoup (Force), a VelvetRevolution (Influence), or a forced resignation of the incumbent PresidentEvil, followed by his assassination (Wealth).

to:

* *
''Video Game/PresidentElect'' (1981) is purely a U.S. presidential election simulator. It covers the period from 1960 to 1988 and allows a significant amount of customization.
*
''VideoGame/RepublicTheRevolution'' (2003) puts you in the shoes of a young activist from a fictional [[UsefulNotes/HoleInFlag post-Soviet]] [[{{Ruritania}} Eastern European]] [[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny republic]] who forms his own political party to topple the corrupt and reactionary government. To do so, he recruits additional activists from [[ClassAndLevelSystem all walks of life]] and assigns them (and himself) to carry out "actions" in the game world[[note]]which consists of three progressively larger cities, each subdivided into multiple districts[[/note]], e.g. investigating a city district (or spreading misinformation), campaigning for popular support of his cause (or sabotaging that of rival parties), or even attacking other parties' functionaries (or protecting his own). Having popular support in a district over time nets you different amounts of three types of political capital (Force, Influence, and Wealth), which correspond to three core ideologies[[note]]roughly: nationalist, social-democratic, and neoliberal, respectively[[/note]] and which you spend to launch actions, as well as story events[[note]]so for a specific action, you need both an activist who has the required ability and sufficient resources[[/note]]. The game has three [[AlignmentBasedEndings ideology-based endings]]: a MilitaryCoup (Force), a VelvetRevolution (Influence), or a forced resignation of the incumbent PresidentEvil, followed by his assassination (Wealth).


* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysofEurope'' is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIronIV''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysofEurope'' (2020) is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIronIV''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.


* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysOfEurope'' is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIronIV''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysOfEurope'' ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysofEurope'' is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIronIV''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.


* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysOfEurope'' is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIron4''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysOfEurope'' is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIron4''.''VideoGame/HeartsOfIronIV''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.



to:

* ''VideoGame/TheNewOrderLastDaysOfEurope'' is an AlternateHistoryNaziVictory mod for the grand strategy game ''VideoGame/HeartsOfIron4''. Despite being a mod for a grand strategy game that had only a secondary focus on political management, TNO puts the political management to the forefront, with many different and unique political simulation mechanics for many nations.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Democratic Socialism Simulator'' (2019) turns the player into the first democratically elected socialist president of a WorldOfFunnyAnimals version of the United States (with a majority of Congress behind you and no Supreme Court issues to maintain RuleOfFun), and gives you a series of binary choices (and some random events) during which you try to maintain your electorate while trying to balance the budget, build socialism and try to reach the climate goals of your administration. Every choice will alienate some parts of the electorate and attract others, in addition to requiring set amounts of popular or congressional support.


Added DiffLines:



* In a [[GovernmentProcedural Government Sim]], they already are in a position power and negotiate policies and spin intrigues to ''remain'' there. In other words, their goal is to maintain their legitimacy while undermining that of the opposition.

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* In a [[GovernmentProcedural Government Sim]], they already are in a position of power and must negotiate policies and spin intrigues to ''remain'' there. In other words, their goal is to maintain their legitimacy while undermining that of the opposition.


Owing to the {{Strategy Game}}s' historical origins in WarGaming, most of them revolve around territorial or resource conflict, even when combat is not the sole focus (e.g. in settlement {{Simulation Game}}s and FourX). By contrast, games that simulate political conflict over influence and ideology tend to deemphasize or even to penalize armed combat. Two subgenres can generally be distinguished:

* [[ElectionDayEpisode Political Campaign Sim]], where players engage in political battle to ''come'' to power (whether through election or revolution), and
* [[GovernmentProcedural Government Sim]], where they already are in power and negotiate policies and spin intrigues to ''remain'' there.

The [[SmallReferencePools most common historical settings]] are, [[WriteWhatYouKnow of course]], UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates (and {{Fantasy Counterpart Culture}}s thereof), followed by generic {{Banana Republic}}s, the ([[UsefulNotes/HoleInFlag former]]) UsefulNotes/SovietUnion, and UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic.

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Owing to the {{Strategy Game}}s' historical origins in WarGaming, most of them revolve around territorial or resource conflict, even when combat is not with the sole focus (e.g. in settlement {{Simulation Game}}s and FourX). ultimate goal of ''dominance''. By contrast, games that simulate the objective in political conflict over influence and ideology tend to deemphasize or even to penalize armed combat. Two strategies is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legitimacy_(political) legitimacy]]'', with two subgenres can generally be distinguished:

* In a [[ElectionDayEpisode Political Campaign Sim]], where players engage in political battle to ''come'' to power (whether through election or revolution), and
revolution). In other words, their goal is to claim and to substantiate greater legitimacy than the opposition.
* In a [[GovernmentProcedural Government Sim]], where they already are in a position power and negotiate policies and spin intrigues to ''remain'' there.

there. In other words, their goal is to maintain their legitimacy while undermining that of the opposition.

While some political strategies have explored feudal settings where legitimacy is derived from [[BlueBlood birthright and titles]], most simulate democratic societies and frame legitimacy in terms of popular support and programmatic ideologies.
The [[SmallReferencePools most common historical settings]] are, [[WriteWhatYouKnow of course]], are therefore UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates (and {{Fantasy Counterpart Culture}}s thereof), followed by generic {{Banana Republic}}s, the ([[UsefulNotes/HoleInFlag former]]) UsefulNotes/SovietUnion, and UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic.



* '''Popular support''' is a indicator of how much sway a given player holds within the simulated constituency. It has different gameplay functions in Campaign and Government Sims: the former usually tie it to the victory condition (the player with the most support wins), while in the latter, they function more like HitPoints (if your support drops below certain threshold as a result of your or other players' actions, {{you lose|AtZeroTrust}}).

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* '''Popular support''' is a indicator of how much sway the legitimacy a given player holds enjoys within the simulated constituency. It has different gameplay functions in Campaign and Government Sims: the former usually tie it to the victory condition (the player with the most support wins), while in the latter, they function more like HitPoints (if your support drops below certain threshold as a result of your or other players' actions, {{you lose|AtZeroTrust}}).



Ultimately, political strategies are about ''managing the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conflict_of_interest conflict of interest]]'': your power (resource) comes from [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_principal_problem representing the interests of others]], whether they are individual voter demographics, special interests like domestic lobbies and foreign [=NGOs=], or rival players, all of whom impose contradictory restrictions on how you can spend that power. The tension comes from maneuvering around these restrictions to maintain existing support while also expanding it.

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Ultimately, The challenge in political strategies are about comes from ''managing the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conflict_of_interest conflict of interest]]'': your power (resource) comes from [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_principal_problem representing the interests of others]], whether they are individual voter demographics, special interests like domestic lobbies and foreign [=NGOs=], or rival players, all of whom impose contradictory restrictions on how you can spend that power. The tension comes from maneuvering around these restrictions to maintain existing support your legitimacy and power base while also expanding it.

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