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** Prior to the game, the Old Gods' role in the main story lines was minimal at best; it was known they existed and had a significant impact on the setting, but were a footnote compared to more immediate evils such as the Horde, the Burning Legion, and the Scourge. Come the MMO however, and their role has expanded exponentially each expansion, to the point that by ''Cataclysm'', they were basically the main antagonists alongside BigBad Deathwing, and in ''Mists of Pandaria'', their influence is what caused the creation of the Sha, the evil beings that are antagonizing the continent and whose power is harnessed by people such as Garrosh to fuel their plans. The ''Chronicle'' finishes this transition by establishing a MythArc for the franchise that revolves around newly-introduced masters of the Old Gods being the ultimate GreaterScopeVillain for the entire franchise (even to the point of being revealed to have caused the FaceHeelTurn of the previously established GreaterScopeVillain).

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** Prior to the game, the Old Gods' role in the main story lines was minimal at best; it was known they existed and had a significant impact on the setting, but were a footnote compared to more immediate evils such as the Horde, the Burning Legion, and the Scourge. Come the MMO however, and their role has expanded exponentially each expansion, to the point that by ''Cataclysm'', they were basically the main antagonists alongside BigBad Deathwing, and in ''Mists of Pandaria'', their influence is what caused the creation of the Sha, the Sha (the evil beings that are antagonizing the continent and whose power is harnessed by people such as Garrosh to fuel their plans. plans). The ''Chronicle'' finishes books finish this transition by establishing a MythArc for the franchise that revolves around newly-introduced masters of the Old Gods Gods, the Void Lords (themselves a tumor that started out as mere voidwalker leaders), being the ultimate GreaterScopeVillain (beyond the Old Gods, who already had that role) for the entire franchise (even to the point of being revealed to have caused the FaceHeelTurn of the previously established GreaterScopeVillain).GreaterScopeVillain, Sargeras of the Burning Legion).


* Borg [[TheAssimilator assimilation]] in ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Originally, in the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' episode ''"Q" Who?'', all they wanted was new toys (tech they had never encountered before), and stole it if they had to, with just a jumpsuit and cybernetic bits grafted on for reasons of RubberForeheadAliens. In "Best of Both Worlds", they kidnapped Picard and borgified him as an emissary. This mutated to become the cyborg, spacefaring ZombieApocalypse that we know and love from ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' and the video games that have Borg in them. Heck, ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' made them even ''more'' zombie-like, with their cybernetics designed to resemble exposed bones.


** Flight is this, when introduced it was a technique that only a few characters had, later almost every single character who fights had this ability, and only one (Videl) is shown actually having to be taught how to.

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** Flight is this, when introduced it was a technique that only a few characters had, later almost every single character who fights had this ability, and only one (Videl) is two (Videl and Goten) are shown actually having to be taught how to.


** For that matter, the Primus/Unicron conflict. In G1, Unicron was "merely" a humongous planet-devouring Transformer, who got defeated in the very movie he appeared in. Eventually, however, he was retconned into a "multiversal singularity" existing ''in every Transformers continuity at once'', along with his good counterpart, who was introduced into the mythos even later. Eventually, fans got so sick of Primus and Unicron that ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' very pointedly avoided mentioning either of them.

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** For that matter, the Primus/Unicron conflict. In G1, Unicron was "merely" a humongous planet-devouring Transformer, who got defeated in the very movie he appeared in. Eventually, however, he was retconned into a "multiversal singularity" existing ''in every Transformers continuity at once'', along with his good counterpart, who was introduced into the mythos even later. Eventually, fans got so sick of Primus and Unicron that ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' very pointedly avoided mentioning either of them. And then ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' mentioned them all over again.


** Force Lightning is used six times in the six movies - three times by Palpatine (''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', twice in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'') and three times by Dooku/Darth Tyrannus (all in ''Film/AttackOfTheClones''). Both major league Sith Lords. In the games, anyone who has a smidge of Dark Side can throw lightning around with impunity, [[http://jediknight3.filefront.com/potd/40774 and on a vastly greater scale, too]].

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** Force Lightning is used six times in the six movies - three times by Palpatine (''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', twice in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'') and three times by Dooku/Darth Tyrannus (all in ''Film/AttackOfTheClones''). Both major league Sith Lords. In the games, anyone who has a smidge of Dark Side can throw lightning around with impunity, [[http://jediknight3.filefront.com/potd/40774 and on a vastly greater scale, too]]. This at least does get touched on in one of the novels starring Jaden Korr, the protagonist of the ''Jedi Academy'' game, where it's noted that the ease with which he is able to call upon powerful Force Lightning, particularly when he's stressed, is a major source of worry for him even a couple decades after his introduction.


** At the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', we see Anakin's spirit standing alongside those of Yoda and Obi-Wan, meaning he achieved ''spiritual'' redemption. There is no indication leaving the Dark Side amounts to anything more. A KarmaHoudini, maybe, but at least there is no indication of it going ''beyond'' the Karma - in both the old and new continuities, he's still remembered pretty much solely as the ultimately-evil Dark Lord of the Sith. For ''absolutely everyone else'' in EU material, going back to Light seems to give an instant ''legal'' amnesty and a clean slate, no matter how many billions they may have murdered in cold blood beforehand. Arguably justified in that the Force is indisputably real in the setting [[FlatEarthAtheist (not that this stops people from disputing it)]], and at least for Force-users, [[CharacterAlignment moral alignment]] actually is a concrete and testable thing. On the other hand, the setting also has many examples of Sith who are successfully able to disguise their alignment.

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** At the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', we see Anakin's spirit standing alongside those of Yoda and Obi-Wan, meaning he achieved ''spiritual'' redemption. There is no indication leaving the Dark Side amounts to anything more. A KarmaHoudini, maybe, but at least there is no indication of it going ''beyond'' the Karma - in both the old and new continuities, he's still remembered pretty much solely as the ultimately-evil Dark Lord of the Sith. For ''absolutely everyone else'' in EU material, going back to Light (assuming it doesn't [[RedemptionEqualsDeath lead to their death]]) seems to give an instant ''legal'' amnesty and a clean slate, no matter how many billions they may have murdered in cold blood beforehand. Arguably justified in that the Force is indisputably real in the setting [[FlatEarthAtheist (not that this stops people from disputing it)]], and at least for Force-users, [[CharacterAlignment moral alignment]] actually is a concrete and testable thing. On the other hand, the setting also has many examples of Sith who are successfully able to disguise their alignment.


* Newtypes in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam''. About two thirds of the way through it somewhat abruptly moves from a sci-fi war story to a sci-fi war story about ''psychics''. Most major characters turn out to be newtypes, they turn out to figure into the backstory, some fairly important characters have motivations involving them...

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* Newtypes in ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam''. About two thirds of the way through it somewhat abruptly moves from a sci-fi war story to a sci-fi war story about ''psychics''. Most major characters turn out to be newtypes, they turn out to figure into the backstory, some fairly important characters have motivations involving them... [[AllThereInTheManual Later background material]] revealed that the idea of Newtypes was a big thing Zeon Deikun (the founder of what became the Principality) talked up to convince people to move into space, by suggesting more "enlightened" Newtypes would arrive to lead humanity to a golden age of peace through their heightened understanding of other people. It [[LampshadeHanging also reveals]] that Deikun was completely full of it and didn't believe a word of what he proposed about Newtypes; that people with psychic powers actually started showing up a couple decades later was a massive coincidence.



** When Tolkien was writing ''Literature/TheHobbit'', he was also [[WorldBuilding designing the fantasy world of Middle-Earth]] in his spare time, just for fun. For his own amusement, and to flesh out the world of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' a little more, he put a few references to Middle-Earth into the book, but he wasn't seriously thinking about adding hobbits to his private WorldBuilding project. However, when he decided to write a sequel to ''Literature/TheHobbit'', the Middle-Earth references increased exponentially, to the point where the book (''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' by name) was as much a sequel to ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' (at that time unpublished) as it was to ''Literature/TheHobbit''. Some ''massive'' amounts of {{retcon}}ning were needed to make the two stories fit into the same setting.

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** When Tolkien was writing ''Literature/TheHobbit'', he was also [[WorldBuilding designing the fantasy world of Middle-Earth]] in his spare time, just for fun. For his own amusement, and to flesh out the world of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' ''The Hobbit'' a little more, he put a few references to Middle-Earth into the book, but he wasn't seriously thinking about adding hobbits to his private WorldBuilding world-building project. However, when he decided to write a sequel to ''Literature/TheHobbit'', ''The Hobbit'', the Middle-Earth references increased exponentially, to the point where the book (''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' by name) was as much a sequel to ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' (at that time unpublished) as it was to ''Literature/TheHobbit''.''The Hobbit''. Some ''massive'' amounts of {{retcon}}ning were needed to make the two stories fit into the same setting.



** In the sonic screwdriver's original appearance in ''Fury from the Deep'', and later in ''The War Games'', it was used ''for unscrewing things''. It only gradually became a do-anything device. It was actually written out of the show because it was becoming a DeusExMachina, before being reintroduced for the Eighth Doctor... and becoming a DeusExMachina. It got so bad that they had to introduce a ''second'' DeusExMachina ("deadlocking") to counteract it. And now it doesn't work on [[WeaksauceWeakness wood]] either.

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** In the sonic screwdriver's original appearance in ''Fury from the Deep'', and later in ''The War Games'', it was used ''for unscrewing things''. It only gradually became a do-anything device. It was actually written out of the show because it was becoming a DeusExMachina, before being reintroduced for the Eighth Doctor... and becoming a DeusExMachina. deus ex machina again. It got so bad that they had to introduce a ''second'' DeusExMachina deus ex machina ("deadlocking") to counteract it. And now it doesn't work on [[WeaksauceWeakness wood]] either.



* When Creator/EllenDeGeneres came out of the closet, then character on her sit-com, ''Series/{{Ellen}}'', did the same. It had been stated that the show would continue normally and that her being gay would not take over the show. However, in the fifth and final season, half the episodes focus on it. TV Guide wrote an article about this with the headline "Yup, She's Too Gay."[[note]]A reference to her coming out of the closet in a previous issue by saying "Yup, I'm gay."[[/note]]

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* When Creator/EllenDeGeneres came out of the closet, then her character on her sit-com, ''Series/{{Ellen}}'', did the same. It had been stated that the show would continue normally and that her being gay would not take over the show. However, in the fifth and final season, half the episodes focus on it. TV Guide wrote an article about this with the headline "Yup, She's Too Gay."[[note]]A reference to her coming out of the closet in a previous issue by saying "Yup, I'm gay."[[/note]]



* ''Series/DarkShadows'': A vampire walks into a conventional soap opera….

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* ''Series/DarkShadows'': A vampire walks into a conventional soap opera…. opera...



*** It gets to the point that, in ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. This even seems to get a LampshadeHanging, where Jaden's first reaction to not sensing any sort of aura on Hoth is to assume Luke was wrong about it having one in the first place, while when Jaden accompanies Kyle to Byss so they can finish Rosh's mission, Kyle realizes right away there's no aura there because it has been drained already.]]

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*** It gets to the point that, in ''VideoGame/JediKnightJediAcademy'', when Luke is sending characters out to investigate whether the bad guys have absorbed strong Force auras from various planets, he's more certain that the player character will find them on Hoth because of that ten-second vision of Obi-Wan from ''Empire'' than he is of Rosh finding them at the remains of Byss, a planet that had actually been described in other works as being totally corrupted by the Emperor's dark side energy. [[spoiler:The cult ''is'' there, though at the very least it seems mostly to look up the old flight logs to find out about other planets that actually ''do'' have strong Force auras which Luke had been to - say, Dagobah. This even seems to get a LampshadeHanging, where Jaden's first reaction to not sensing any sort of aura on Hoth is to assume Luke was wrong about it having one in the first place, while when Jaden accompanies Kyle to Byss so they can finish Rosh's mission, Kyle realizes they realize right away there's no aura there because it has been drained already.]]



** At the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', we see Anakin's spirit standing alongside Jedi, meaning he achieved ''spiritual'' redemption. There is no indication leaving the Dark Side amounts to anything more. A KarmaHoudini, maybe, but at least there is no indication of it going ''beyond'' the Karma - in the expanded universe he's still remembered pretty much solely as the ultimately-evil Dark Lord of the Sith. For ''absolutely everyone else'' in EU material, going back to Light seems to give an instant ''legal'' amnesty and a clean slate, no matter how many billions they may have murdered in cold blood beforehand. Arguably justified in that the Force is indisputably real in the setting [[FlatEarthAtheist (not that that stops people from disputing it)]], and at least for Force-users, [[CharacterAlignment moral alignment]] actually is a concrete and testable thing. On the other hand, the setting also has many examples of Sith who are successfully able to disguise their alignment.

to:

** At the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', we see Anakin's spirit standing alongside Jedi, those of Yoda and Obi-Wan, meaning he achieved ''spiritual'' redemption. There is no indication leaving the Dark Side amounts to anything more. A KarmaHoudini, maybe, but at least there is no indication of it going ''beyond'' the Karma - in both the expanded universe old and new continuities, he's still remembered pretty much solely as the ultimately-evil Dark Lord of the Sith. For ''absolutely everyone else'' in EU material, going back to Light seems to give an instant ''legal'' amnesty and a clean slate, no matter how many billions they may have murdered in cold blood beforehand. Arguably justified in that the Force is indisputably real in the setting [[FlatEarthAtheist (not that that this stops people from disputing it)]], and at least for Force-users, [[CharacterAlignment moral alignment]] actually is a concrete and testable thing. On the other hand, the setting also has many examples of Sith who are successfully able to disguise their alignment.


* ''Franchise/MetalGear''

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear''


''Series/DarkShadows'': A vampire walks into a conventional soap opera….

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* ''Series/DarkShadows'': A vampire walks into a conventional soap opera….


** In the first four generations the individual versions of the games is never referenced. The Wi-Fi features of Gen V implied the two versions on ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''and ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' took place in alternate dimensions. The existence of alternate dimensions where each individual version takes place is confirmed in the postgame of ''Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire''; this becomes important in the postgame of ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' [[spoiler: where it turns out Annabel originally comes from the world ''Emerald'' takes place in and she came to the world of ''Sun and Moon'' via a portal.]]

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** In the first four generations the individual versions of the games is never referenced. The Wi-Fi features of Gen V implied the two versions on ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''and ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' took place in alternate dimensions. The existence of alternate dimensions where each individual version takes place is confirmed in the postgame of ''Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire''; this becomes important in the postgame of ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' [[spoiler: where it turns out Annabel originally comes from the world ''Emerald'' takes place in and she came to the world of ''Sun and Moon'' via a portal.]]

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''Series/DarkShadows'': A vampire walks into a conventional soap opera….


** Starting with ''Battle of Gods'', the serialization of ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'' has a heavy focus on the Gods. While Gods have already appeared in the franchise before, they were usually weaker than the heroes, but with the introduction of Gods of Destruction and Angels, the revelance of Gods has escalated, as most plots is around Gods and their conflicts or the heroes trying to obtain godly powers. Even worse, the Gods of Destruction made the PowerCreep even worse than before, like Freeza did in his first arc. When people talk about characters being on God level, they usually mean the level of Gods of Destruction.

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** Starting with ''Battle of Gods'', the serialization of ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'' has a heavy focus on the Gods. While Gods have already appeared in the franchise before, they were usually weaker than the heroes, but with the introduction of Gods of Destruction and Angels, the revelance relevance of Gods has escalated, as most plots is around Gods and their conflicts or the heroes trying to obtain godly powers. Even worse, the Gods of Destruction made the PowerCreep even worse than before, like Freeza did in his first arc. When people talk about characters being on God level, they usually mean the level of Gods of Destruction.



* {{Disney}} tends to do this with love plots. Although they have started subverting and inverting this, most of the Disney movies, both canon and non, have some kind of love plot. Most of the time this isn't detrimental to the story, especially when the original work involved a love plot. However, sometimes it can become a RomanticPlotTumor. For instance, at the end of ''Disney/TheJungleBook'' when [[spoiler: Mowgli meets the girl from the village and follows her out of the jungle, it becomes sort of an AssPull, since that's not how any of ''Literature/TheJungleBook'' stories ended]].

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* {{Disney}} Creator/{{Disney}} tends to do this with love plots. Although they have started subverting and inverting this, most of the Disney movies, both canon and non, have some kind of love plot. Most of the time this isn't detrimental to the story, especially when the original work involved a love plot. However, sometimes it can become a RomanticPlotTumor. For instance, at the end of ''Disney/TheJungleBook'' when [[spoiler: Mowgli meets the girl from the village and follows her out of the jungle, it becomes sort of an AssPull, since that's not how any of ''Literature/TheJungleBook'' stories ended]].







* ''Film/TheInventionOfLying'' The movie is a comedy until it turns to the serious and heavy of religion when Mark invents the concept of heaven to comfort his ill mother.

* ''Film/TheManFromEarth'' After the discussion of John's immortality turns to religion, a religious plot tumor ensues. Characters stops asking about his experiences as a 14,000 year old being and the discussion swerves to an argument about religion and mythology.

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* ''Film/TheInventionOfLying'' ''Film/TheInventionOfLying'': The movie is a comedy until it turns to the serious and heavy of religion when Mark invents the concept of heaven to comfort his ill mother.

mother.
* ''Film/TheManFromEarth'' ''Film/TheManFromEarth'': After the discussion of John's immortality turns to religion, a religious plot tumor ensues. Characters stops asking about his experiences as a 14,000 year old being and the discussion swerves to an argument about religion and mythology. \n










* Borg [[TheAssimilator Assimilation]] in ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Originally, in the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' episode ''"Q" Who?'', all they wanted was new toys (tech they had never encountered before), and stole it if they had to, with just a jumpsuit and cybernetic bits grafted on for reasons of RubberForeheadAliens. In ''Best of Both Worlds'', they kidnapped Picard and borgified him as an emissary. This mutated to become the cyborg, spacefaring ZombieApocalypse that we know and love from ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' and the video games that have Borg in them. Heck, ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' made them even ''more'' zombie-like, with their cybernetics designed to resemble exposed bones.

to:

* Borg [[TheAssimilator Assimilation]] assimilation]] in ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Originally, in the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' episode ''"Q" Who?'', all they wanted was new toys (tech they had never encountered before), and stole it if they had to, with just a jumpsuit and cybernetic bits grafted on for reasons of RubberForeheadAliens. In ''Best "Best of Both Worlds'', Worlds", they kidnapped Picard and borgified him as an emissary. This mutated to become the cyborg, spacefaring ZombieApocalypse that we know and love from ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' and the video games that have Borg in them. Heck, ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' made them even ''more'' zombie-like, with their cybernetics designed to resemble exposed bones.



** In the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', we see Anakin's spirit standing alongside Jedi, meaning he achieved ''spiritual'' redemption. There is no indication leaving the Dark Side amounts to anything more. A KarmaHoudini, maybe, but at least there is no indication of it going ''beyond'' the Karma - in the expanded universe he's still remembered pretty much solely as the ultimately-evil Dark Lord of the Sith. For ''absolutely everyone else'' in EU material, going back to Light seems to give an instant ''legal'' amnesty and a clean slate, no matter how many billions they may have murdered in cold blood beforehand. Arguably justified in that the Force is indisputably real in the setting [[FlatEarthAtheist (not that that stops people from disputing it)]], and at least for Force-users, [[CharacterAlignment moral alignment]] actually is a concrete and testable thing. On the other hand, the setting also has many examples of Sith who are successfully able to disguise their alignment.

to:

** In At the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', we see Anakin's spirit standing alongside Jedi, meaning he achieved ''spiritual'' redemption. There is no indication leaving the Dark Side amounts to anything more. A KarmaHoudini, maybe, but at least there is no indication of it going ''beyond'' the Karma - in the expanded universe he's still remembered pretty much solely as the ultimately-evil Dark Lord of the Sith. For ''absolutely everyone else'' in EU material, going back to Light seems to give an instant ''legal'' amnesty and a clean slate, no matter how many billions they may have murdered in cold blood beforehand. Arguably justified in that the Force is indisputably real in the setting [[FlatEarthAtheist (not that that stops people from disputing it)]], and at least for Force-users, [[CharacterAlignment moral alignment]] actually is a concrete and testable thing. On the other hand, the setting also has many examples of Sith who are successfully able to disguise their alignment.



** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is this. During classic and ''The Burning Crusade'', the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then ''Wrath of the Lich King'' was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by the Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely no sense for the factions to be warring at the time, like usually more level-headed characters starting it on the doorstep of a villain who can turn their dead against them). By ''Mists of Pandaria'', it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early ''Warlords of Draenor'' development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], with the Horde and the Alliance being at each other's throats again. ''Legion'' mostly avoids it in the main plot, but still comes up with a contrived reasons for the factions to distrust each other during an apocalyptic invasion (the Horde is forced to retreat when the flank is overrun, but completely neglect to communicate this to the Alliance, who believes they were abandoned on purpose).

to:

** One can argue that the constant conflicts between the Horde and the Alliance is this. During classic and ''The Burning Crusade'', the bouts between the two factions was largely just proxy cold-war battles, which according to WordOfGod, had little to no relevance to the overall story. Then ''Wrath of the Lich King'' was released, and the writers apparently decided they wanted to kick the conflict into high gear and make it a major storyline element. Cue [=WotLK=] and two following expansions having storylines that were constantly sidetracked by the Horde/Alliance war (even when it made absolutely no sense for the factions to be warring at the time, like usually more level-headed characters starting it on the doorstep of a villain who can turn their dead against them). By ''Mists of Pandaria'', it had completely derailed the overall storyline, and most of the playerbase had gotten sick of it all. Early ''Warlords of Draenor'' development initially tries to avoid any storyline hooks or references to the recent war, but then apparently underwent AesopAmnesia with [[ThatOneLevel Ashran]], with the Horde and the Alliance being at each other's throats again. ''Legion'' mostly avoids it in the main plot, but still comes up with a contrived reasons reason for the factions to distrust each other during an apocalyptic invasion (the Horde is forced to retreat when the flank is overrun, but completely neglect to communicate this to the Alliance, who believes they were abandoned on purpose).



* The Ravenhearst story-arc from ''VideoGame/MysteryCaseFiles'' could have been wrapped up as soon as it's ''first game finished'', and yet the story got developed more and more through all the subsequent installements, going more insane with every game. Somehow, between ''Ravenhearst'' and the arc's final wrap up in ''Ravenhearst Unlocked'', only ''Shadow Lake'' and the non-PC games weren't connected in any mean to the Ravenhearst storyline - 10 games in total (''Dire Grove'' and ''13th Skull'' being only loosety linked, though). In other words, the story of a woman being abducted by a jilted lover ended with the lover's 500 years old father unearthing his cursed medieval hometown with the help of a carnival owners crystal ball after spending 500 years as a druid, a dark sorcerer and murdering hundreds of innocents in his quest for immortality. Phew!

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* The Ravenhearst story-arc from ''VideoGame/MysteryCaseFiles'' could have been wrapped up as soon as it's ''first game finished'', and yet the story got developed more and more through all the subsequent installements, installments, going more insane with every game. Somehow, between ''Ravenhearst'' and the arc's final wrap up in ''Ravenhearst Unlocked'', only ''Shadow Lake'' and the non-PC games weren't connected in any mean to the Ravenhearst storyline - 10 games in total (''Dire Grove'' and ''13th Skull'' being only loosety loosely linked, though). In other words, the story of a woman being abducted by a jilted lover ended with the lover's 500 years old father unearthing his cursed medieval hometown with the help of a carnival owners crystal ball after spending 500 years as a druid, a dark sorcerer and murdering hundreds of innocents in his quest for immortality. Phew!





* Legendary Pokémon in ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' started out as powerful, one of a kind Pokémon that could be fought and caught but had nothing to do with the storyline of the games. ''Gold and Silver'' made them actual mythological creatures that where tied into the backstory but you still did not need to fight them (the remakes changed this so that you had to fight the mascot of the game). By ''Ruby and Sapphire'' every single villainous team has tried to use the mascot legendary in their plans and a couple more legendaries often have a plot important role.
** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' does subvert it, since most of the villains' focus is instead on Cosmog and the Ultra Beasts. [[spoiler: It subverts it by revealing that Cosmog actually ''is'' the version legendary, just in a harmless baby form, and none of the characters actually knew it. Given her dismissive attitude once she's done using it for her plan to summon the Ultra Beasts, and the fact that she planned on capturing the version legendary for her collection, it's easy to assume even the ''villain'' didn't know what Cosmog really was.]]

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''
**
Legendary Pokémon in ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' started out as powerful, one of a kind Pokémon that could be fought and caught but had nothing to do with the storyline of the games. ''Gold and Silver'' made them actual mythological creatures that where tied into the backstory but you still did not need to fight them (the remakes changed this so that you had to fight the mascot of the game). By ''Ruby and Sapphire'' every single villainous team has tried to use the mascot legendary in their plans and a couple more legendaries often have a plot important role.
** *** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' does subvert it, since most of the villains' focus is instead on Cosmog and the Ultra Beasts. [[spoiler: It subverts it by revealing that Cosmog actually ''is'' the version legendary, just in a harmless baby form, and none of the characters actually knew it. Given her dismissive attitude once she's done using it for her plan to summon the Ultra Beasts, and the fact that she planned on capturing the version legendary for her collection, it's easy to assume even the ''villain'' didn't know what Cosmog really was.]]
** In the first four generations the individual versions of the games is never referenced. The Wi-Fi features of Gen V implied the two versions on ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''and ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' took place in alternate dimensions. The existence of alternate dimensions where each individual version takes place is confirmed in the postgame of ''Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire''; this becomes important in the postgame of ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' [[spoiler: where it turns out Annabel originally comes from the world ''Emerald'' takes place in and she came to the world of ''Sun and Moon'' via a portal.
]]


*** In-universe, the capabilities of the sonic screwdriver were justified by the Doctor having modified it. Being several centuries old and with different personalities each regeneration cycle, it would make sense he would tinker and improve the sonic, especially with each new experience.

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* The Ravenhearst story-arc from ''VideoGame/MysteryCaseFiles'' could have been wrapped up as soon as it's ''first game finished'', and yet the story got developed more and more through all the subsequent installements, going more insane with every game. Somehow, between ''Ravenhearst'' and the arc's final wrap up in ''Ravenhearst Unlocked'', only ''Shadow Lake'' and the non-PC games weren't connected in any mean to the Ravenhearst storyline - 10 games in total (''Dire Grove'' and ''13th Skull'' being only loosety linked, though). In other words, the story of a woman being abducted by a jilted lover ended with the lover's 500 years old father unearthing his cursed medieval hometown with the help of a carnival owners crystal ball after spending 500 years as a druid, a dark sorcerer and murdering hundreds of innocents in his quest for immortality. Phew!

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