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* ''Film/BigFish:'' the father claims to have been shown his own death by a witch, and that it made him fearless, because he knew nothing but that could kill him. Of course, that was 90% lies.

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* ''Film/BigFish:'' the ''Film/BigFish'': The father claims to have been shown his own death by a witch, and that it made him fearless, because he knew nothing but that could kill him. Of course, that was 90% lies.



* In ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' the main characters have all experienced at least one near death experience and managed to survive or in case of Gandalf [[BackFromTheDead he not only came back]], [[CameBackStrong he came back stronger]] (Except Boromir). Aragorn especially has shown this, surviving after falling from a cliff and getting up with no injuries after a explosion occurred right beneath his feet, when everybody else near to him died.

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* In ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' the main characters have all experienced at least one near death near-death experience and managed to survive or in case of Gandalf [[BackFromTheDead he not only came back]], [[CameBackStrong he came back stronger]] (Except (except Boromir). Aragorn especially has shown this, surviving after falling from a cliff and getting up with no injuries after a an explosion occurred right beneath his feet, when everybody else near to him died.



* Very unsubtle Plot Armor for main human protagonists was a consistent problem with the live action ''Film/TransformersFilmSeries'' movies. After Sam and Mikaela keep getting thrown into concrete by 20 foot tall metal creatures and suffering nary a scratch, it becomes impossible for viewers to ever believe they're ever in any real danger, killing suspense. Because of this, when Sam was nearly killed in the second movie (he was caught INSIDE a corny explosion and thrown at least ten feet, all without even significantly damaging his clothing) exactly no one was surprised when he survived without any obvious injury.

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* Very unsubtle Plot Armor for main human protagonists was a consistent problem with the live action ''Film/TransformersFilmSeries'' movies. After Sam and Mikaela keep getting thrown into concrete by 20 foot tall 20-foot-tall metal creatures and suffering nary a scratch, it becomes impossible for viewers to ever believe they're ever in any real danger, killing suspense. Because of this, when Sam was nearly killed in the second movie (he was caught INSIDE a corny explosion and thrown at least ten feet, all without even significantly damaging his clothing) exactly no one was surprised when he survived without any obvious injury.



* One of the many letdowns of the ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' books is Meyer's continuous promises of danger to characters followed by little to no follow through. In the first book, Laurent refuses to fight against James even though it would be an eight to two fight. Which basically means James must be the badass of badasses. Actually Jasper and Emmett take him out alone. And easily. Book Four is the biggest Plot Armor moment when a brutal battle between the Volturi and the Cullen/Cullen allies that has been worked up for ages devolves into a friendly talk and a okay, let's go home situation. The Twilight characters are supposed to be in real you-could-really-die situations but somehow everyone leaves everything unscathed every single time. (With the exception of Jacob [[GoodThingYouCanHeal breaking some bones that heal in a day or two]].)

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* One of the many letdowns of the ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' books is Meyer's continuous promises of danger to characters followed by little to no follow through.follow-through. In the first book, Laurent refuses to fight against James even though it would be an eight to two fight. Which basically means James must be the badass of badasses. Actually Jasper and Emmett take him out alone. And easily. Book Four is the biggest Plot Armor moment when a brutal battle between the Volturi and the Cullen/Cullen allies that has been worked up for ages devolves into a friendly talk and a okay, an "okay, let's go home home" situation. The Twilight characters are supposed to be in real you-could-really-die situations but somehow everyone leaves everything unscathed every single time. (With the exception of Jacob [[GoodThingYouCanHeal breaking some bones that heal in a day or two]].)



** [[spoiler: Kai from Season 6. Witch psychopath who's only power is to absorb other's magic and then use it? Why don't you vampires just drive a knive through his throat while he's powerless and be done with him? Oh yeah, because of Tyler's ''Main/RomanceSidequest'']]

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** [[spoiler: Kai from Season 6. Witch psychopath who's whose only power is to absorb other's magic and then use it? Why don't you vampires just drive a knive knife through his throat while he's powerless and be done with him? Oh yeah, because of Tyler's ''Main/RomanceSidequest'']]



* In ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'', if an ally unit is defeated during a army battle, there is a chance that they will be gone for good, preventing you from getting the GoldenEnding. Plot-relevant characters are immune to this and will just retreat.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'', if an ally unit is defeated during a an army battle, there is a chance that they will be gone for good, preventing you from getting the GoldenEnding. Plot-relevant characters are immune to this and will just retreat.



** The comic "Anduin: Son of the Wolf" ends with a FlashForward to a conversation between Velen and Anduin, the latter of whom is now an old man. Given that Anduin is only 17 in ''Legion'', this means both of these characters must survive for at least the next 50 or so in-universe years -probably well beyond the lifespan of [=WoW=], unless there's a TimeSkip or something. It's especially bad because the comic came out right around the time Velen announced his seemingly suicidal plan to retake Argus from the Burning Legion.

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** The comic "Anduin: Son of the Wolf" ends with a FlashForward to a conversation between Velen and Anduin, the latter of whom is now an old man. Given that Anduin is only 17 in ''Legion'', this means both of these characters must survive for at least the next 50 or so in-universe years -probably -- probably well beyond the lifespan of [=WoW=], unless there's a TimeSkip or something. It's especially bad because the comic came out right around the time Velen announced his seemingly suicidal plan to retake Argus from the Burning Legion.


* Every ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' series uses it to some extent due to the general DuringTheWar[=/=]WarIsHell setting, with extremely few main characters ending up as causalities of plot-irrelevant battles regardless of their tactical situation. Some shows completely spare the main cast while others put the lesser heroes through the ringer (and typically only in the last few episodes, at that; if the Plot Armor gets pierced, it almost always happens in the finale). Many a FlameWar has been started by someone declaring that one of the series uses Plot Armor beyond WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, while either ignoring or forgetting that the show they're currently championing does as well. (Translation: Use the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and do '''NOT''' post specific examples here.)

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* Every ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' series uses it to some extent due to the general DuringTheWar[=/=]WarIsHell setting, with extremely few main characters ending up as causalities casualties of plot-irrelevant battles regardless of their tactical situation. Some shows completely spare the main cast while others put the lesser heroes through the ringer (and typically only in the last few episodes, at that; if the Plot Armor gets pierced, it almost always happens in the finale). Many a FlameWar has been started by someone declaring that one of the series uses Plot Armor beyond WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, while either ignoring or forgetting that the show they're currently championing does as well. (Translation: Use the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and do '''NOT''' post specific examples here.)


-->-- '''Peter Griffin,''' demonstrating a solid understanding of this trope, and a profound misunderstanding of FriendlyTarget, ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', "[[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball Something, Something, Something Dark Side]]"

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-->-- '''Peter Griffin,''' Griffin''' demonstrating a solid understanding of this trope, and a profound misunderstanding of FriendlyTarget, ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', "[[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball Something, Something, Something Dark Side]]"


-->-- '''Peter Griffin,''' demonstrating a solid understanding of this trope, and a profound misunderstanding of FriendlyTarget. ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', "[[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball Something, Something, Something Dark Side]]"

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-->-- '''Peter Griffin,''' demonstrating a solid understanding of this trope, and a profound misunderstanding of FriendlyTarget. FriendlyTarget, ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', "[[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball Something, Something, Something Dark Side]]"


* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''

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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''''Manga/{{Naruto}}'':



* An explicit plot point of ''Comicbook/ContestOfChampions''. The Collector and the Maestro don't want to bring down the collective wrath of the entire Franchise/MarvelUniverse, so most of the combatants they kidnap for the tournament are obscure heroes who won't be missed. When they do kidnap a well-known hero like Comicbook/IronMan or [[Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy Gamora]], they only keep them around briefly before wiping their memories and sending them back home.

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* An explicit plot point of ''Comicbook/ContestOfChampions''. The Collector and the Maestro don't want to bring down the collective wrath of the entire Franchise/MarvelUniverse, so most of the combatants they kidnap for the tournament are obscure heroes who won't be missed. When they do kidnap a well-known hero like Comicbook/IronMan or [[Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy Gamora]], Comicbook/{{Gamora}}, they only keep them around briefly before wiping their memories and sending them back home.



** ''The Punisher'' once resisted ''ComicBook/GhostRider'''s Penance Stare, under the reasoning that Frank doesn’t feel guilty about his innumerous murder cases, it was against unrepentant criminals and the like so for Frank it was justice at work, not a collection of sins; that contradicts many instances where the Penance Stare is said to work on absolutely any living being who has ever sinned, taking a life regardless of the motivations behind it, i.e: Galactus can be affected by the Penance Stare even if he is a natural force of the universe who doesn’t consider his planet-sized killings as something evil.

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** ''The Punisher'' once resisted ''ComicBook/GhostRider'''s ComicBook/GhostRider's Penance Stare, under the reasoning that Frank doesn’t feel guilty about his innumerous murder cases, cases; it was against unrepentant criminals and the like so for Frank it was justice at work, not a collection of sins; that sins. That contradicts many instances where the Penance Stare is said to work on absolutely any living being who has ever sinned, taking a life regardless of the motivations behind it, i.e: e.: Galactus can be affected by the Penance Stare even if he is a natural force of the universe who doesn’t consider his planet-sized killings as something evil.



* Franchise/{{Batman}}. While not often too egregious in his own book, the second he steps into a Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}} book he's a very different character. For someone who is often championed as "Just a normal man" who works very hard, it is very hard to swallow when he will be struck by characters who can rip through steel like paper, be hurled through multiple stone pillars/walls, dodge attacks that Franchise/TheFlash and Franchise/{{Superman}} get struck by, and only end up a bit bruised or sore when he should be liquefied by now. Almost always in full force during any Superman vs Batman encounter where there is seemingly always an excuse why Superman, who even in his weakest incarnation, is "Faster than a speeding bullet" has one iota of trouble against Batman, whose Kryptonite IS bullets. Plus, even when Batman wises up and wears PoweredArmor, he often has his helmet in the same shape as his iconic mask, with his mouth completely exposed. Amazingly, no one ever sends a super strong/super fast punch right through his unprotected mouth.

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* Franchise/{{Batman}}. While not often too egregious in his own book, the second he steps into a Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}} book he's a very different character. For someone who is often championed as "Just a normal man" who works very hard, it is very hard to swallow when he will be struck by characters who can rip through steel like paper, be hurled through multiple stone pillars/walls, dodge attacks that Franchise/TheFlash and Franchise/{{Superman}} get struck by, and only end up a bit bruised or sore when he should be liquefied by now. Almost always in full force during any Superman vs vs. Batman encounter where there is seemingly always an excuse why Superman, who even in his weakest incarnation, is "Faster than a speeding bullet" has one iota of trouble against Batman, whose Kryptonite IS bullets. Plus, even when Batman wises up and wears PoweredArmor, he often has his helmet in the same shape as his iconic mask, with his mouth completely exposed. Amazingly, no one ever sends a super strong/super fast punch right through his unprotected mouth.



* ''Film/ScaryMovie''

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* ''Film/ScaryMovie'' ''Film/ScaryMovie'':



** Hagrid has Plot Armor throughout the whole series, because as stated by WordOfGod, Rowling knew that Hagrid would carry Harry at the end of the 7th book from the very beginning. This Plot Armor allows him to safely deal with creatures deemed mortally dangerous by the Ministry for Magic. A minor RunningGag with him is that it never really sinks in that they're actually dangerous to normal people; this causes problems when he becomes a teacher.

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** Hagrid has Plot Armor throughout the whole series, because as stated by WordOfGod, Rowling knew that Hagrid would carry Harry at the end of the 7th book from the very beginning. This Plot Armor allows him to [[FluffyTamer safely deal with creatures deemed mortally dangerous by the Ministry for Magic.Magic]]. A minor RunningGag with him is that it never really sinks in that they're actually dangerous to normal people; this causes problems when he becomes a teacher.



** By the series' seventh season it became apparent that plot armor had already kicked in: in the fourth episode, Jaime Lannister charges on horse towards Daenerys who is beside her biggest dragon. Drogon, of course, attacks Jaime with deep hot flames... but he is saved ''by Bronn''. Were it any early season, none of this characters would have survived that, even less a secondary (but incredibly popular) character like Bronn. Seems the writers are avoiding major deaths until the season climaxes, not unlike other series (of which ''Game of Thrones'' used to distinguish itself).

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** By the series' seventh season it became apparent that plot armor had already kicked in: in the fourth episode, Jaime Lannister charges on horse towards Daenerys who is beside her biggest dragon. Drogon, of course, attacks Jaime with deep hot flames... but he is saved ''by Bronn''. Were it any early season, none of this the characters would have survived that, even less a secondary (but incredibly popular) character like Bronn. Seems the writers are avoiding major deaths until the season climaxes, not unlike other series (of which ''Game of Thrones'' used to distinguish itself).



* ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': The protagonist IS this trope. The sheer number of times Dr. Lecter has been able to avoid discovery and/or certain death through his opponents' convenient idiocy, ploys that rely on his ability to make people do what he wants without even trying (like a certain neurologist willing to lie to his patient about an inflammation of his brain) or sheer coincidence (caught in the act of murder? thank goodness the witness is face-blind!) would be enough for a series with ten times as many episodes and STILL look ridiculous.
* ''Series/{{Homeland}}'': Peter Quinn. This show deals with espionage, terrorism, and national security, so, combined with the nature of Peter Quinn's character as an elite covert paramilitary operative, this character has exceptionally thick plot armor. Since his introduction in the second season his uniquely strong abilities in espionage, assassination, and surveillance have made him a central player because his presence makes it much easier to advance an interesting, suspenseful plot. Yet for exactly that reason, he has survived numerous attempts to kill him, sometimes bouncing back from near-mortal wounds in record time. [[spoiler: As of the second to last episode of Season 6, Quinn has been shot twice in the gut, caught in an explosion, shot in the head (but it only grazed him) and then nearly drowned while trying to escape shooter, and even suffered a stroke after being ''sarin-gassed''. The writers may be somewhat aware of this, as in Season 6, they depict him suffering serious paralysis and cognitive deficits as a result of the stroke. But he is still able to work mostly as well he did previously because he is able to singlehandedly both take down a SWAT team breaking into Carrie's house, and later uncover an internal false flag terrorism conspiracy black-op and kill one of its perpetrators.]]



* ''Series/{{Homeland}}'': Peter Quinn. This show deals with espionage, terrorism, and national security, so, combined with the nature of Peter Quinn's character as an elite covert paramilitary operative, this character has exceptionally thick plot armor. Since his introduction in the second season his uniquely strong abilities in espionage, assassination, and surveillance have made him a central player because his presence makes it much easier to advance an interesting, suspenseful plot. Yet for exactly that reason, he has survived numerous attempts to kill him, sometimes bouncing back from near-mortal wounds in record time. [[spoiler: As of the second to last episode of Season 6, Quinn has been shot twice in the gut, caught in an explosion, shot in the head (but it only grazed him) and then nearly drowned while trying to escape shooter, and even suffered a stroke after being ''sarin-gassed''. The writers may be somewhat aware of this, as in Season 6, they depict him suffering serious paralysis and cognitive deficits as a result of the stroke. But he is still able to work mostly as well he did previously because he is able to singlehandedly both take down a SWAT team breaking into Carrie's house, and later uncover an internal false flag terrorism conspiracy black-op and kill one of its perpetrators.]]



* ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': The protagonist IS this trope. The sheer number of times Dr. Lecter has been able to avoid discovery and/or certain death through his opponents' convenient idiocy, ploys that rely on his ability to make people do what he wants without even trying (like a certain neurologist willing to lie to his patient about an inflammation of his brain) or sheer coincidence (caught in the act of murder? thank goodness the witness is face-blind!) would be enough for a series with ten times as many episodes and STILL look ridiculous.



* ''LiveAction/TheWalkingDead'' has this for anyone that is generally considered a "main character", like Rick, Carl, Daryl, or Glenn. While these characters are certainly placed in danger often enough, they are often kept alive by what amounts to pure luck. Possibly the most transparent example of this is at the beginning of Season 5, where Rick, Daryl, and Glenn are about to be slaughtered by a CannibalClan and are placed at the end of a line with nothing but RedShirts in front of them. The butcher works his way through killing the extras, but is interrupted and stopped by another cannibal approaching him a split second before he can kill Glenn.

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* ''LiveAction/TheWalkingDead'' ''Series/TheWalkingDead'' has this for anyone that is generally considered a "main character", like Rick, Carl, Daryl, or Glenn. While these characters are certainly placed in danger often enough, they are often kept alive by what amounts to pure luck. Possibly the most transparent example of this is at the beginning of Season 5, where Rick, Daryl, and Glenn are about to be slaughtered by a CannibalClan and are placed at the end of a line with nothing but RedShirts {{Red Shirt}}s in front of them. The butcher works his way through killing the extras, but is interrupted and stopped by another cannibal approaching him a split second before he can kill Glenn.



[[folder:Professional wrestling]]
* Throughout its long history, wrestling has had a fetish of propping up old stars instead of actually pushing new ones. As the past has shown, {{Wrestling/WWE}} (in particular ''[[{{Wrestling/WWERAW}} RAW]]'') won't push anybody higher than they absolutely have to. Look at [[Wrestling/HulkHogan Hogan]]. Stayed on top until he left. Everyone else was on the fringe until Hogan, [[Wrestling/RandySavage Savage]], [[Wrestling/UltimateWarrior Warrior]] and co. were all gone. Once the "main event" guys started defecting to {{Wrestling/WCW}}, then guys like Wrestling/SteveAustin found room at the top. After Austin, [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson Rock]] and others left, [[Wrestling/JohnCena Cena]], [[Wrestling/RandyOrton Orton]] and {{Wrestling/Batista}} found their way up the card. Now, despite having the most talented and charismatic roster of all time possibly, nobody in WWE gets any kind of push-up except the veterans [[DentedIron who can barely walk anymore]], or people with family connections, like Wrestling/RomanReigns (cousin of Rocky) or {{Wrestling/Charlotte}} (daughter of Wrestling/RicFlair).

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[[folder:Professional wrestling]]
Wrestling]]
* Throughout its long history, wrestling has had a fetish of propping up old stars instead of actually pushing new ones. As the past has shown, {{Wrestling/WWE}} (in particular ''[[{{Wrestling/WWERAW}} RAW]]'') won't push anybody higher than they absolutely have to. Look at [[Wrestling/HulkHogan Hogan]]. Stayed on top until he left. Everyone else was on the fringe until Hogan, [[Wrestling/RandySavage Savage]], [[Wrestling/UltimateWarrior Warrior]] and co. were all gone. Once the "main event" guys started defecting to {{Wrestling/WCW}}, then guys like Wrestling/SteveAustin found room at the top. After Austin, [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson Rock]] and others left, [[Wrestling/JohnCena Cena]], [[Wrestling/RandyOrton Orton]] and {{Wrestling/Batista}} found their way up the card. Now, despite having the most talented and charismatic roster of all time possibly, nobody in WWE gets any kind of push-up except the veterans [[DentedIron who can barely walk anymore]], or people with family connections, like Wrestling/RomanReigns (cousin of Rocky) or {{Wrestling/Charlotte}} {{Wrestling/Charlotte|Flair}} (daughter of Wrestling/RicFlair).



* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':''VideoGame/MetalGear'':



* Because TropesAreTools, ''Franchise/DanganRonpa'' uses this and subverts to clarify that AnyoneCanDie. [[spoiler:The first victim of the first game is played as if she has this, being a ChildhoodFriend and played as if she was going to be the {{Deuteragonist}}, something she was during the demo, her death is a ShockingSwerve that clarifies the nature of the game]]. In the second game, [[spoiler:the first victim is a survivor from the previous game]]. And in the third, [[spoiler:the first one executed is the ''player character''. The role is taken up by another character from this point on.]].

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* Because TropesAreTools, ''Franchise/DanganRonpa'' uses this and subverts to clarify that AnyoneCanDie. [[spoiler:The first victim of the first game is played as if she has this, being a ChildhoodFriend and played as if she was going to be the {{Deuteragonist}}, something she was during the demo, her death is a ShockingSwerve that clarifies the nature of the game]]. In the second game, [[spoiler:the first victim is a survivor from the previous game]]. And in the third, [[spoiler:the first one executed is the ''player character''. The role is taken up by another character from this point on.]].on]].



* Over the course of the story of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'', the protagonists, including the Scions of the Seventh Dawn, often find themselves in perilous situations or sustaining grave injuries, only to be be stated afterwards to have survived and been placed on the mend, such that they may return later. The only real aversion to this is [[spoiler:Papalymo's HeroicSacrifice]]. To name a few examples from ''Heavensward'' and ''Stormblood'', where these instances are more common:

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* Over the course of the story of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'', the protagonists, including the Scions of the Seventh Dawn, often find themselves in perilous situations or sustaining grave injuries, only to be be stated afterwards to have survived and been placed on the mend, such that they may return later. The only real aversion to this is [[spoiler:Papalymo's HeroicSacrifice]]. To name a few examples from ''Heavensward'' and ''Stormblood'', where these instances are more common:



* In ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'', Monarch Henchmen 21 and 24 are perfectly aware of their unlikely Plot Armour, to where they spend an entire mission pointing out to a RedShirt how he will die while the two of them live on. Their boss realizes this, too: "[[MauveShirt I know it sounds crazy, but they both have that rare blend of "expendable" and "invulnerable" that makes for a perfect henchman]]."

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'', Monarch Henchmen 21 and 24 are perfectly aware of their unlikely Plot Armour, Armor, to where they spend an entire mission pointing out to a RedShirt how he will die while the two of them live on. Their boss realizes this, too: "[[MauveShirt I know it sounds crazy, but they both have that rare blend of "expendable" and "invulnerable" that makes for a perfect henchman]]."


** Literature/CiaphasCain is the narrator of his books, which are presented as his memoirs from his time in retirement, so it's kind of a given he'll see the end of each story. Other characters protected by the "memoirs" rationale: Jurgen, Cain's aide-de-camp who stays with Cain his entire documented career; Amberly Vail, Cain's Inquisitorial connection and off-again-on-again lover, who's editing the memoirs; and Jenit Sulla, who we're told very early on will someday become a general (and whose terrible, terrible memoirs often fill in gaps in Cain's narrative). Since this is a much more comedic view of the 40K universe, this isn't a problem; even in the grim darkness of the far future, not knowing if a character will survive to the end would damage their humor value. It's also notable in that the characters themselves ''notice''. Cain in particular is so convinced that all of his successes are due to pure luck that he totally overlooks his own BadassNormal status, and so despite a century of ludicrously one-sided victories thinks of himself as a phony. One group of very religious soldiers he briefly served with ended up so blown away after seeing him take on a powerful daemon that there is now a small sect on their homeworld that considers him a ''saint''.

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** Literature/CiaphasCain is the narrator of his books, which are presented as his memoirs from his time in retirement, so it's kind of a given he'll see the end of each story. Other characters protected by the "memoirs" rationale: Jurgen, Cain's aide-de-camp who stays with Cain his entire documented career; Amberly Vail, Cain's Inquisitorial connection and off-again-on-again lover, who's editing the memoirs; and Jenit Sulla, who we're told very early on will someday become a general (and whose terrible, terrible memoirs often fill in gaps in Cain's narrative).narrative), and a handful of one-book characters who cross path with Cain whose survival is proven by Amberley annotating Cain's story with passages from their own recollection of said events (though one of those memoirs includes a note that they were never finished, hinting in advance that he doesn't survive the entire story). Since this is a much more comedic view of the 40K universe, this isn't a problem; even in the grim darkness of the far future, not knowing if a character will survive to the end would damage their humor value. It's also notable in that the characters themselves ''notice''. Cain in particular is so convinced that all of his successes are due to pure luck that he totally overlooks his own BadassNormal status, and so despite a century of ludicrously one-sided victories thinks of himself as a phony. One group of very religious soldiers he briefly served with ended up so blown away after seeing him take on a powerful daemon that there is now a small sect on their homeworld that considers him a ''saint''.


* In [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11651073/1/It-Gets-Worse It Gets Worse]], Taylor gets this power instead of bug control. And it makes her, in Director Piggot's words, "scarier than any [parahuman] I've encountered yet. And yes, I am including Nilbog in that total." If anyone is about to harm Taylor, something will happen to stop them. And if they were doing it on purpose, they will be punished in proportion to the scale of their deliberate offense. Taylor's power can sense any attempt to harm her, without any conscious effort on her part, and can if necessary reach back in time up to the moment of her trigger to set events in motion - which makes her get stronger the more time passes. In under two weeks her powers had been able to manipulate reality sufficiently to break the ABB and the Merchants, take out half the Empire-88, terrorize Coil into turning himself in, and lure in and kill/neutralize most of the Slaughterhouse 9, all without any conscious action on Taylor's, and in many cases even her knowledge. On top of it all, her powers work in a variety of bizarre but hilarious Rube Goldberg-esque ways, such as Lung getting tarred and feathered or Kaiser getting hit by a literal ton of frozen crap.

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* In [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11651073/1/It-Gets-Worse It Gets Worse]], Taylor gets this power instead of bug control. And it makes her, in Director Piggot's words, "scarier than any [parahuman] I've encountered yet. And yes, I am including Nilbog in that total." If anyone is about to harm Taylor, something will happen to stop them. And if they were doing it on purpose, they will be punished in proportion to the scale of their deliberate offense. Taylor's power can sense any attempt to harm her, without any conscious effort on her part, and can if necessary reach back in time up to the moment of her trigger to set events in motion - which makes her get stronger the more time passes. In under two weeks her powers had been able to manipulate reality sufficiently to break the ABB and the Merchants, take out half the Empire-88, terrorize Coil into turning himself in, and lure in and kill/neutralize most of the Slaughterhouse 9, all without any conscious action on Taylor's, and in many cases even her knowledge.knowledge, suggesting that within a year she'll be utterly unstoppable. On top of it all, her powers work in a variety of bizarre but hilarious Rube Goldberg-esque ways, such as Lung getting tarred and feathered or Kaiser getting hit by a literal ton of frozen crap.


* In [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11651073/1/It-Gets-Worse It Gets Worse]], Taylor gets this power instead of bug control. And it makes her, in Director Piggot's words, "scarier than any [parahuman] I've encountered yet. And yes, I am including Nilbog in that total." If anyone is about to harm Taylor, something will happen to stop them. And if they were doing it on purpose, they will be punished in proportion to the scale of their deliberate offense. Taylor's power can sense any attempt to harm her, without any conscious effort on her part, and can if necessary reach days or even months back in time to set events in motion.

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* In [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11651073/1/It-Gets-Worse It Gets Worse]], Taylor gets this power instead of bug control. And it makes her, in Director Piggot's words, "scarier than any [parahuman] I've encountered yet. And yes, I am including Nilbog in that total." If anyone is about to harm Taylor, something will happen to stop them. And if they were doing it on purpose, they will be punished in proportion to the scale of their deliberate offense. Taylor's power can sense any attempt to harm her, without any conscious effort on her part, and can if necessary reach days or even months back in time up to the moment of her trigger to set events in motion.motion - which makes her get stronger the more time passes. In under two weeks her powers had been able to manipulate reality sufficiently to break the ABB and the Merchants, take out half the Empire-88, terrorize Coil into turning himself in, and lure in and kill/neutralize most of the Slaughterhouse 9, all without any conscious action on Taylor's, and in many cases even her knowledge. On top of it all, her powers work in a variety of bizarre but hilarious Rube Goldberg-esque ways, such as Lung getting tarred and feathered or Kaiser getting hit by a literal ton of frozen crap.

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* This becomes rather obvious towards the end of ''Film/{{Sharktopus}}'', when the killer shark-octopus hybrid has been attacking and killing boatloads of people throughout the film, but is suddenly very reluctant when faced with the hero Andy at the end to actually eat him. Then, when he kills the sharktopus by throwing a bomb into its gullet, the resulting explosion doesn't even graze him.


* The Games Workshop ''LordOfTheRings'' game gave major characters something like "Fate points" -- allowing them to shrug off wounds just ''because'' they're major characters. The number of fate points a character gets is determined by how good their final fate in the films and books is -- for instance, Aragorn, Sam, Gandalf the White etc. have high fate point counts, whereas Boromir, Denethor, Grí­ma Wormtongue etc have low counts.

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* The Games Workshop ''LordOfTheRings'' game ''TabletopGame/TheLordOfTheRingsStrategyBattleGame'' gave major characters something like "Fate points" -- allowing them to shrug off wounds just ''because'' they're major characters. The number of fate points a character gets is determined by how good their final fate in the films and books is -- for instance, Aragorn, Sam, Gandalf the White etc. have high fate point counts, whereas Boromir, Denethor, Grí­ma Wormtongue etc have low counts.


* In Spycraft, a critical hit will kill any "minion"-class enemy in one shot, but will only knock an enemy Agent or major villain unconscious.

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* In Spycraft, ''TabletopGame/{{Spycraft}}'', a critical hit will kill any "minion"-class enemy in one shot, but will only knock an enemy Agent or major villain unconscious.

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* ''Series/DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency'': Bart, the Holistic Assassin has a very strong one, with an in-universe explanation: the ''universe'' has a plan for her and is protecting her from any possible harm, and also, to some extent, her kidnapping victim-turned-ally Ken. She however, can be harmed when she isn't acting according to the universe's plans, as this protection is lifted.


Sometimes referred to as "Script Immunity" or a "Character Shield", Plot Armor is when a main character's life and health are safeguarded by the fact that he's the one person who can't be removed from the story. Therefore, whenever Bob is in a situation where he could be killed (or at the least very seriously injured), he comes out unharmed with no logical, InUniverse explanation.[[note]]a typical explanation is that Bob survived through sheer luck, but nevertheless, if ninety-nine times out of one-hundred the character would have died, then it's not a very good reason.[[/note]]

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Sometimes referred to as "Script Immunity" or a "Character Shield", Plot Armor is when a main character's life and health are safeguarded by the fact that he's the one person who can't be removed from the story. Therefore, whenever Bob is in a situation where he could be killed (or at the least very seriously injured), he comes out unharmed with no logical, InUniverse explanation.[[note]]a [[note]]A typical explanation is that Bob survived through sheer luck, but nevertheless, if ninety-nine times out of one-hundred luck on the character would have died, then it's not basis of the AnthropicPrinciple. If only one person is going to survive the story, that person has to be Bob for there to ''be'' a very good reason.story.[[/note]]

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* ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'': Many of the non-superpowered characters, especially Kara's sister Alex, get regularly grabbed, punched or thrown around by villains that have demonstrated enough strength to go one-on-one with supergirl. Inevitably they are either rescued while the villain pointless gloats or somehow survive with, at most, a broken bone (rapidly healed by next episode of course), whereas they should, by all rights, have ended up as a smear on the wall.

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