Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / OutdatedOutfit

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* Invoked in ''Film/NurseBetty''. The title character believes she's a nurse on her favorite soap opera hospital, and the most surefire sign that she's out of place is the fact that she's wearing the little white nurse dress and cap while surrounded by actual nurses wearing modern blue scrubs.


* [[CampStraight Ken]] from ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory3'' is very [[RealMenWearPink into fashion]] and pretty much all of his clothes date from the late 1950s to the early 1980s.

to:

* [[CampStraight Ken]] from ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory3'' is very [[RealMenWearPink into fashion]] and pretty much all of his clothes date from the late 1950s to the early 1980s. Comes back to bite him in the ass when Barbie starts tearing them apart as part of her [[InterrogationByVandalism interrogation]].


'''Ken''': The "Growing Formal" collection, yes!

to:

'''Ken''': The "Growing "Groovy Formal" collection, yes!


* Oliver of the Series/BradyBunch, when he appears in ''[[https://scrappydooisfoundaliveinnebraska.tumblr.com/post/623928392772960256/nobody-had-to-die-batman-the-brave-and-bold nobody had to die]]'' is described as a "Baby John Lennon" (with the long hair and the round glasses) and the unnamed narrator describes his apparel as the product of a bygone era. [[BigSisterInstinct She still wants to protect him, though.]]



** Pretty much everyone's outfit really! Daphne and Velma look incredibly dated when not wearing more modern duds. The only one that could be said to have avoided it is Shaggy, and he's only avoided it out of luck -- pants and a t-shirt just refuse to go out of style. Although Shaggy's pants were originally (that is, in the 1969 series) drawn bell-bottomed, so not even he is entirely safe. In the 1980s stories with [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], the bell-bottomed ends were gone, inexplicably gaining a red shirt in the process, though later they were changed to brown again.

to:

** Pretty much everyone's outfit really! Daphne and Velma look incredibly dated when not wearing more modern duds. The only one that could be said to have avoided it is Shaggy, and he's only avoided it out of luck -- pants and a t-shirt just refuse to go out of style. Although Shaggy's pants were originally (that is, in the 1969 series) drawn bell-bottomed, so not even he is entirely safe. In the 1980s stories with [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], Scrappy, the bell-bottomed ends were gone, inexplicably gaining a red shirt in the process, though later they were changed to brown again.

Added DiffLines:

* Invoked in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat11''. When several of the original Kombatants are plucked from the 90's in the time travel plot, most of the characters are wearing what they wore in the older games...except Johnny Cage, who is dressed in hideous 90's day-glo and not the subdued karate pants with no shirt that he ''actually'' wore in every ''Mortal Kombat'' up until ''[[VideoGame/MortalKombatX MKX]]''. This could be due to Johnny's personality having been massively {{flanderized}} since ''[[VideoGame/MortalKombat9 MK9]]''.


-->-- '''Joanne''', ''Theatre/{{Company}}'', "The Ladies Who Lunch"

to:

-->-- '''Joanne''', ''Theatre/{{Company}}'', ''[[Theatre/CompanySondheim Company]]'', "The Ladies Who Lunch"

Added DiffLines:

* Men who don't normally wear business suits may keep one in the closet for special occasions and use it for years or decades because it doesn't get worn enough to be damaged. Sharp-eyed observers should be able to nail when a man bought his suit down to the year by looking at the cut.

Added DiffLines:

* This becomes a plot point in ''Film/SomewhereInTime''. Richard procures what he thinks is a period-appropriate suit when traveling back in time only to arrive and find out that it's ten years out of date. Then, when he tries showing off how practical his suit is, he [[spoiler:accidentally discovers a modern penny, which snaps him back to the modern day]].


* Mother Gothel from ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' has a wardrobe ''centuries'' out of date, which serves as an indicator that she's [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld far older than she appears to be]].

to:

* Mother Gothel from ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Tangled}}'' has a wardrobe ''centuries'' out of date, which serves as an indicator that she's [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld far older than she appears to be]].


!!Examples

to:

!!Examples
!!Examples:



* In ''ComicBook/TheBeano'', the artists occasionally tried to 'update' the characters' clothes. It usually didn't take (as with ''The Bash Street Kids'' and, to some extent, ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Dennis the Menace]]''), but subtler changes did (as with ''Roger The Dodger'' getting long trousers).
* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': According to WordOfGod, Mortadelo's clothing was already outdated when the comic was started in TheFifties.
* ComicBook/{{Spirou|AndFantasio}} is perhaps the ultimate incarnation of this trope: When he started in 1938 he was a bell-boy elevator operator in a chic hotel wearing the traditional red outfit. The outfit (especially the hat) has become tied with the character, even as bell-boys in general and elevator operators in particular were consigned to history. Most readers ended up not knowing what the hell Spirou's uniform came from, but changing it became problematic because it was so intrinsically tied with the characters. Thus Spirou wore his outfit for many decades despite it being out of place. Newer authors compromised by making Spirou wear a variety of red clothes, and only keeping the uniform's hat to be used occasionally as a ContinuityNod. Many characters have even remarked on the odd hat's appearance or even outright questioned where it's from. Of course, it's lampshaded in ''ComicBook/LePetitSpirou'' where every single member of Spirou's family wears the outfit 24/7. Recent takes on the series justify the clothes in different ways: in Emile Bravo's version for example, Spirou is a bell-boy operator but the reason he wears the outfit all the time is that he's too poor to buy new clothes. Meanwhile, Fantasio's fondness for bow-ties remains unexplained throughout the series.



** Additionally, the Thompsons have tried a few times to blend in when investigating in a foreign country, but their outfits were often too "folkloric", and on at least one occasion, the national dress of the wrong country. Far from blending in, they've been known to attract crowds come to laugh at them. Nowhere more hilarious than in ''The Blue Lotus'', where they come wearing '''17th century Manchu era''' clothes, complete with ponytails and fans![[note]]They were also holding their canes behind their backs as they walked down the street, making it all the funnier.[[/note]] The result?
--->'''Thompson (with nearly the entire town parading behind them laughing):''' "Don't look now, but something tells me we're being followed..."
* ComicBook/{{Spirou|AndFantasio}} is perhaps the ultimate incarnation of this trope: When he started in 1938 he was a bell-boy elevator operator in a chic hotel wearing the traditional red outfit. The outfit (especially the hat) has become tied with the character, even as bell-boys in general and elevator operators in particular were consigned to history. Most readers ended up not knowing what the hell Spirou's uniform came from, but changing it became problematic because it was so intrinsically tied with the characters. Thus Spirou wore his outfit for many decades despite it being out of place. Newer authors compromised by making Spirou wear a variety of red clothes, and only keeping the uniform's hat to be used occasionally as a ContinuityNod. Many characters have even remarked on the odd hat's appearance or even outright questioned where it's from. Of course, it's lampshaded in ''ComicBook/LePetitSpirou'' where every single member of Spirou's family wears the outfit 24/7. Recent takes on the series justify the clothes in different ways: in Emile Bravo's version for example, Spirou is a bell-boy operator but the reason he wears the outfit all the time is that he's too poor to buy new clothes. Meanwhile, Fantasio's fondness for bow-ties remains unexplained throughout the series.
* In ''ComicBook/TheBeano'', the artists occasionally tried to 'update' the characters' clothes. It usually didn't take (as with ''The Bash Street Kids'' and, to some extent, ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Dennis the Menace]]''), but subtler changes did (as with ''Roger The Dodger'' getting long trousers).
* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': According to WordOfGod, Mortadelo's clothing was already outdated when the comic was started in TheFifties.

to:

** Additionally, the Thompsons have tried a few times to blend in when investigating in a foreign country, but their outfits were often too "folkloric", and on at least one occasion, the national dress of the wrong country. Far from blending in, they've been known to attract crowds come to laugh at them. Nowhere more hilarious than in ''The Blue Lotus'', where they come wearing '''17th century '''17th-century Manchu era''' clothes, complete with ponytails and fans![[note]]They were also holding their canes behind their backs as they walked down the street, making it all the funnier.[[/note]] The result?
--->'''Thompson (with
result?[[note]]which provides the page image for OverlyStereotypicalDisguise[[/note]]
--->'''Thompson:''' ''[with
nearly the entire town parading behind them laughing):''' "Don't laughing]'' Don't look now, but something tells me we're being followed..."
* ComicBook/{{Spirou|AndFantasio}} is perhaps the ultimate incarnation of this trope: When he started in 1938 he was a bell-boy elevator operator in a chic hotel wearing the traditional red outfit. The outfit (especially the hat) has become tied with the character, even as bell-boys in general and elevator operators in particular were consigned to history. Most readers ended up not knowing what the hell Spirou's uniform came from, but changing it became problematic because it was so intrinsically tied with the characters. Thus Spirou wore his outfit for many decades despite it being out of place. Newer authors compromised by making Spirou wear a variety of red clothes, and only keeping the uniform's hat to be used occasionally as a ContinuityNod. Many characters have even remarked on the odd hat's appearance or even outright questioned where it's from. Of course, it's lampshaded in ''ComicBook/LePetitSpirou'' where every single member of Spirou's family wears the outfit 24/7. Recent takes on the series justify the clothes in different ways: in Emile Bravo's version for example, Spirou is a bell-boy operator but the reason he wears the outfit all the time is that he's too poor to buy new clothes. Meanwhile, Fantasio's fondness for bow-ties remains unexplained throughout the series.
* In ''ComicBook/TheBeano'', the artists occasionally tried to 'update' the characters' clothes. It usually didn't take (as with ''The Bash Street Kids'' and, to some extent, ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Dennis the Menace]]''), but subtler changes did (as with ''Roger The Dodger'' getting long trousers).
* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': According to WordOfGod, Mortadelo's clothing was already outdated when the comic was started in TheFifties.

Added DiffLines:

* In the second season of ''Series/StrangerThings'', students of Hawkins Middle School and Hawkins High School in 1984 wear plaid, long skirts and fashion that came out of TheSixties. In "MADMAX", the scenes went from two girls walking with short-sleeved vests and long plaid skirts to a girl wearing a turtleneck and a plaid skirt. There is also a girl with EightiesHair and a plaid, long skirt walking down in a hallway full of students.

Added DiffLines:

* Many military customs and courtesies are based around the wearing of hats (generally called "covers", at least in the US), and their wear is required outdoors with almost all uniforms, long after wearing hats was considered mandatory in civilian society. US Navy regulations, for example, mandate that that covers must be worn at all times outdoors, except when unsafe to do so such as on a flight line, that salutes are only rendered or returned while covered, and that they should not be worn indoors, unless the wearer is "under arms" (armed in the conduct of their duties). None of this sort of hat etiquette really exists in contemporary society.


--> '''Barbie''': Ooh, a Nehru jacket!//
'''Ken''': Barbie, not the Nehru!//
'''Barbie''': This is from, what, 1967?//

to:

--> '''Barbie''': Ooh, a Nehru jacket!//
jacket!\\
'''Ken''': Barbie, not the Nehru!//
Nehru!\\
'''Barbie''': This is from, what, 1967?//1967?\\

Added DiffLines:

--> '''Barbie''': Ooh, a Nehru jacket!//
'''Ken''': Barbie, not the Nehru!//
'''Barbie''': This is from, what, 1967?//
'''Ken''': The "Growing Formal" collection, yes!

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': According to WordOfGod, Mortadelo's clothing was already outdated when the comic was started in TheFifties.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 270

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report