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** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones "Smith and Jones"]] has a plasmavore, a vampiric creature not named as such. Admittedly, they differ from vampires in some significant ways.

to:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones "Smith and Jones"]] has a plasmavore, a vampiric creature not named as such. Admittedly, they differ from vampires in some significant ways. Like drinking blood through a straw.

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* The flesh-eating undead in Joan Frances Turner's Literature/ResurgamTrilogy regard "zombie" as a slur. There's a bit in the first book where the narrator explains that it's like how Inuit won't call themselves "Eskimo", and mentions that ironically, there is an undead gang in the Dakotas that call themselves the Eskimos.
** When [[spoiler:her brother]] finds her and tries to communicate, he calls her a zombie, but her vocal cords have rotted enough that she can't speak verbally anymore. She eventually just picks up a stick, draws a Z in the dirt, and scratches it out to get her point across.


* While most of the enemies introduced (as well as affected heroes) in ''Videogame/DarkestDungeon'' are clearly vampires, they're instead called bloodsuckers.

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* While most of the enemies introduced (as well as affected heroes) in the Crimson Court DLC for ''Videogame/DarkestDungeon'' are clearly vampires, they're instead called bloodsuckers.


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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' The {{Revenant Zombie}}s created by Orochimaru and Kabuto are referred to as "Edo Tensei Reanimations." Oddly enough the term "zombie" seems to exist, as Kisame jokingly calls Hidan and Kakuzu the "Zombie Combo" for their powers making them somewhat resemble the undead.
* ''Manga/HighschoolOfTheDead'' doesn't even bother making up some name for the zombies, everyone just calls them "Them". One character called them zombies, only to be ''corrected'' by another character who made it sound as though zombies are entirely different creatures from the ones the cast faces; ([[CallARabbitASmeerp they're not]]). It's later mentioned by one of the main characters that the word "Them" was a piece of brilliance: It becomes easier to put "Them" down if you don't think of them as anything and thus affirm their existence as former humans. In the English dub, Takagi mentions it once while in the mansion, but it's the only time it's spoken. Not sure if it was a mistake on the voice actress' part, or if they accidentally had that word in the script dialogue she was reading.

to:

* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' The {{Revenant Zombie}}s created by Orochimaru and Kabuto ''Manga/BlackButler'' introduces CameBackWrong zombies in the Campania arc, which have a very traditional appearance (stitches, falling-apart bodies, gaping mouths, shambling gait) but are referred to as "Edo Tensei Reanimations." Oddly enough Bizarre Dolls. This is most likely because the term series is set in Victorian England, long before the word "zombie" seems to exist, as Kisame jokingly calls Hidan and Kakuzu the "Zombie Combo" for their powers making them somewhat resemble the undead.
* ''Manga/HighschoolOfTheDead'' doesn't even bother making up some name for the zombies, everyone just calls them "Them". One character called them zombies, only to be ''corrected'' by another character who made it sound as though zombies are entirely different creatures from the ones the cast faces; ([[CallARabbitASmeerp they're not]]). It's later mentioned by one of the main characters that the word "Them" was a piece of brilliance: It becomes easier to put "Them" down if you don't think of them as anything and thus affirm their existence as former humans. In the English dub, Takagi mentions it once while in the mansion, but it's the only time it's spoken. Not sure if it was a mistake on the voice actress' part, or if they accidentally had that word in the script dialogue she was reading.
entered common usage.



* In the ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' dub, Jaden and the others keep annoyingly referring to the zombies as "Duel Ghouls".
* ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo'':
** In the episode "Lullaby of the Lost", there's a character named Okuru. To Western viewers, he seems to embody a lot of tropes that apply to American Indians. This is because he's supposed to be one of the Ainu, the native peoples of Japan. However, Japanese broadcast code is ''extremely'' strict on how the Ainu may be portrayed. Therefore, Okuru is never explicitly identified as Ainu.
** A later episode features zombies as villains; despite the show being a serious AnachronismStew ([[ItMakesSenseInContext and proudly so]]), none of the protagonists refer to them as such or as anything, really. Again, the series is set well before the modern concept of a zombie was established, but this is the same show with beat-boxing samurai (and, later on, [[BaseballEpisode a baseball episode]] pitting the main characters -- who live in the ''Edo period'' -- against Americans).
* ''Manga/TheKurosagiCorpseDeliveryService'' has to deal with corpses on a regular basis. Most of them are even animate at some point, due to the main character's ability to let the spirits of the dead briefly animate their own bodies. They are, however, never referred to as "zombies". "Clients" is used instead.
* ''Manga/{{Parasyte}}'': Humans are quick to identify the mysterious invaders as "parasites", rather than aliens. But because the narrative is deliberately ambiguous on whether or not new predators came from another world, or [[GaiasVengeance just manifested from ours]], the absence of the "a"-word may totally be justified. [[spoiler:It also makes the Mayor's HumansAreTheRealMonsters-centric speech at the end much more meaningful.]]



* ''Manga/BlackButler'' introduces CameBackWrong zombies in the Campania arc, which have a very traditional appearance (stitches, falling-apart bodies, gaping mouths, shambling gait) but are referred to as Bizarre Dolls. This is most likely because the series is set in Victorian England, long before the word "zombie" entered common usage.

to:

* ''Manga/BlackButler'' introduces CameBackWrong ''Manga/HighschoolOfTheDead'' doesn't even bother making up some name for the zombies, everyone just calls them "Them". One character called them zombies, only to be ''corrected'' by another character who made it sound as though zombies are entirely different creatures from the ones the cast faces; ([[CallARabbitASmeerp they're not]]). It's later mentioned by one of the main characters that the word "Them" was a piece of brilliance: It becomes easier to put "Them" down if you don't think of them as anything and thus affirm their existence as former humans. In the English dub, Takagi mentions it once while in the Campania arc, which have a very traditional appearance (stitches, falling-apart bodies, gaping mouths, shambling gait) mansion, but it's the only time it's spoken. Not sure if it was a mistake on the voice actress' part, or if they accidentally had that word in the script dialogue she was reading.
* ''Manga/TheKurosagiCorpseDeliveryService'' has to deal with corpses on a regular basis. Most of them are even animate at some point, due to the main character's ability to let the spirits of the dead briefly animate their own bodies. They are, however, never referred to as "zombies". "Clients" is used instead.
* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' The {{Revenant Zombie}}s created by Orochimaru and Kabuto
are referred to as Bizarre Dolls. "Edo Tensei Reanimations." Oddly enough the term "zombie" seems to exist, as Kisame jokingly calls Hidan and Kakuzu the "Zombie Combo" for their powers making them somewhat resemble the undead.
* ''Manga/{{Parasyte}}'': Humans are quick to identify the mysterious invaders as "parasites", rather than aliens. But because the narrative is deliberately ambiguous on whether or not new predators came from another world, or [[GaiasVengeance just manifested from ours]], the absence of the "a"-word may totally be justified. [[spoiler:It also makes the Mayor's HumansAreTheRealMonsters-centric speech at the end much more meaningful.]]
* ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo'':
** In the episode "Lullaby of the Lost", there's a character named Okuru. To Western viewers, he seems to embody a lot of tropes that apply to American Indians.
This is most likely because he's supposed to be one of the Ainu, the native peoples of Japan. However, Japanese broadcast code is ''extremely'' strict on how the Ainu may be portrayed. Therefore, Okuru is never explicitly identified as Ainu.
** A later episode features zombies as villains; despite the show being a serious AnachronismStew ([[ItMakesSenseInContext and proudly so]]), none of the protagonists refer to them as such or as anything, really. Again,
the series is set in Victorian England, long well before the modern concept of a zombie was established, but this is the same show with beat-boxing samurai (and, later on, [[BaseballEpisode a baseball episode]] pitting the main characters -- who live in the ''Edo period'' -- against Americans).
* The zombies in ''Manga/SchoolLive'' are never mentioned in any fashion, they're just there. If anything it makes the contrast between SliceOfLife and ZombieApocalypse even more disturbing. According to the manga zombie fiction does exist, and you can even spot a poster from ''Series/TheWalkingDead'' once, however still no one mentions
the word "zombie" entered common usage.or even euphemisms like "undead".



* The zombies in ''Manga/SchoolLive'' are never mentioned in any fashion, they're just there. If anything it makes the contrast between SliceOfLife and ZombieApocalypse even more disturbing. According to the manga zombie fiction does exist, and you can even spot a poster from ''Series/TheWalkingDead'' once, however still no one mentions the word "zombie" or even euphemisms like "undead".



* In the ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'' dub, Jaden and the others keep annoyingly referring to the zombies as "Duel Ghouls".



* ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'':
** Heavily averted. Dillon and Chuck are into zombies and everyone refers to the zombies as they are.
** Kevin gets berated for referring to a group of zombies as "the horde". According to him "zombie" lacks a certain "''je ne sai quoi''".
* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] and [[DiscussedTrope discussed]] in ''ComicBook/AtomicRobo''. Robo and his team dub a race of monsters from a parallel dimension as [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] despite the fact that they really ''aren't'' vampires; they don't follow any vampiric folklore and only really resemble the concept in the vaguest sense (monsters that used to be human and drink blood), but "vampire" is a good enough word to describe them and the team has better things to do than come up with stupid nicknames, so that's what they call them.



* In ''ComicBook/DeadEyesOpen'', the undead are called Returners. They also can be called [[FantasticSlurs Deadies]].
* In ''Defoe'', zombies are referred to as 'reeks', though Defoe himself has the title 'zombie-hunter general'.
* Robert Venditti's first ''ComicBook/DemonKnights'' storyline involves a horde of bloodsucking undead lead by the BigBad from ''ComicBook/IVampire'', but because it's set in 11th century Western Europe, none of the characters know the word "vampire".



* In ''ComicBook/{{Empowered}}'', reanimated supers really hate the "z-word." Understandable, as aside from briefly post-reanimation, most are as smart as ever.
* In ''ComicBook/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicIDW'' #16, Rainbow Dash is really against anypony using "the zed word", in a probable direct reference to [[Film/ShaunOfTheDead the trope namer]].
* Creator/GrantMorrison's ''ComicBook/NewXMen'' run did this with superheroes. Though "mutant" is used frequently, the word "superhero" is only mentioned once, when ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} remarks "I was never sure why ComicBook/{{Professor X}}avier had us dress like ''superheroes''," when reviewing the team's new black leather uniforms. As part of Morrison's run, the other superheroes in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse are never mentioned or acknowledged, and the X-Men fervently insist that they're not (nor have they ever been) superheroes themselves...despite the costumes, codenames, secret identities, use of mutations to fight crime...



* ''ComicBook/{{Raptors}}'' features blood-drinking, super-strong, fanged immortals that are not once referred to as vampires.
* ''ComicBook/SimonDark'': Includes one {{flesh golem}} made of twenty-four dead teenagers, two revived murder victims with stopped aging, three formerly human "familiars" who essentially {{escaped from Hell}} an entire cult of [[PossessingADeadBody dead humans who are being worn by demonic entities]] and a whole bunch of [[TechnicallyLivingZombie living humans]] who end up pale and superstrong and under the control of a bit of evil magic that causes them to mindlessly attack any other living soul in their vicinity. The word zombie is never once uttered or hinted at.



* In ''ComicBook/DeadEyesOpen'', the undead are called Returners. They also can be called [[FantasticSlurs Deadies]].
* In ''Defoe'', zombies are referred to as 'reeks', though Defoe himself has the title 'zombie-hunter general'.
* In ''ComicBook/{{Empowered}}'', reanimated supers really hate the "z-word." Understandable, as aside from briefly post-reanimation, most are as smart as ever.
* Creator/GrantMorrison's ''ComicBook/NewXMen'' run did this with superheroes. Though "mutant" is used frequently, the word "superhero" is only mentioned once, when ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} remarks "I was never sure why ComicBook/{{Professor X}}avier had us dress like ''superheroes''," when reviewing the team's new black leather uniforms. As part of Morrison's run, the other superheroes in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse are never mentioned or acknowledged, and the X-Men fervently insist that they're not (nor have they ever been) superheroes themselves...despite the costumes, codenames, secret identities, use of mutations to fight crime...
* Robert Venditti's first ''ComicBook/DemonKnights'' storyline involves a horde of bloodsucking undead lead by the BigBad from ''ComicBook/IVampire'', but because it's set in 11th century Western Europe, none of the characters know the word "vampire".
* In ''ComicBook/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicIDW'' #16, Rainbow Dash is really against anypony using "the zed word", in a probable direct reference to [[Film/ShaunOfTheDead the trope namer]].
* ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'':
** Heavily averted. Dillon and Chuck are into zombies and everyone refers to the zombies as they are.
** Kevin gets berated for referring to a group of zombies as "the horde". According to him "zombie" lacks a certain "''je ne sai quoi''".
* ''ComicBook/{{Raptors}}'' features blood-drinking, super-strong, fanged immortals that are not once referred to as vampires.
* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] and [[DiscussedTrope discussed]] in ''ComicBook/AtomicRobo''. Robo and his team dub a race of monsters from a parallel dimension as [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] despite the fact that they really ''aren't'' vampires; they don't follow any vampiric folklore and only really resemble the concept in the vaguest sense (monsters that used to be human and drink blood), but "vampire" is a good enough word to describe them and the team has better things to do than come up with stupid nicknames, so that's what they call them.
* ''ComicBook/SimonDark'': Includes one {{flesh golem}} made of twenty-four dead teenagers, two revived murder victims with stopped aging, three formerly human "familiars" who essentially {{escaped from Hell}} an entire cult of [[PossessingADeadBody dead humans who are being worn by demonic entities]] and a whole bunch of [[TechnicallyLivingZombie living humans]] who end up pale and superstrong and under the control of a bit of evil magic that causes them to mindlessly attack any other living soul in their vicinity. The word zombie is never once uttered or hinted at.



* ''Film/{{Nosferatu}}'' used - well, "nosferatu" to avoid saying "vampire." This was probably to disguise the fact that it was a wholesale CaptainErsatz rip-off of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}''. It had copyright infringement problems as it was, considering that it was a more faithful adaptation of the book than any of the "official" filmed versions.

to:

* ''Film/{{Nosferatu}}'' used - -- well, "nosferatu" to avoid saying "vampire." This was probably to disguise the fact that it was a wholesale CaptainErsatz rip-off of ''Literature/{{Dracula}}''. It had copyright infringement problems as it was, considering that it was a more faithful adaptation of the book than any of the "official" filmed versions.



* ''Literature/{{Carmilla}}'': The word "vampire" is not used up to Chapter 13 (of 16), when it is used by the woodman who relates how the village of Karnstein came to be deserted. Before that, there is only ominous talk of the "oupire", the equivalent of vampire in the North-Slavic languages.



* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'': ''Literature/SoLongAndThanksForAllTheFish'' contains a lampshade on this when discussing a real-life Rain God - "We can't call him supernatural, because people think they know what that means, and we can't really call him paranormal either for the same reason. So let's call him 'paranatural' or 'supernormal'..."

to:

* ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'': ''Literature/SoLongAndThanksForAllTheFish'' contains a lampshade on this when discussing a real-life Rain God - -- "We can't call him supernatural, because people think they know what that means, and we can't really call him paranormal either for the same reason. So let's call him 'paranatural' or 'supernormal'..."



* ''Literature/{{Carmilla}}'': The word "vampire" is not used up to chapter 13 (of 16), when it is used by the woodman who relates how the village of Karnstein came to be deserted. Before that, there is only ominous talk of the "oupire", the equivalent of vampire in the North-Slavic languages.



* Lampshaded in [=S3E3=] of ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}''. "...or they were hiding a zombie." "Oh christ, are we really gonna call her that?" The [[Series/BeingHumanUS USA/Canada]] version also makes this distinction [[spoiler:in season 3 when Sally and two of her ghostly friends are brought back to life. Sally also hates the idea that she is starting to decompose and refuses to call it that, as well]].

to:

* Lampshaded in [=S3E3=] of ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}''. "...or they were hiding a zombie." "Oh christ, are we really gonna call her that?" The [[Series/BeingHumanUS USA/Canada]] version also makes this distinction [[spoiler:in season Season 3 when Sally and two of her ghostly friends are brought back to life. Sally also hates the idea that she is starting to decompose and refuses to call it that, as well]].



** The Source is the most powerful demon who rules the Underworld - don't call him "the Devil". To be fair it is a position rather than a single being, but then plenty of other works have used "the Devil" that way too.
* ''Series/DeadSet'' never uses the word zombie to describe its undead - writer Charlie Brooker wanted to distinguish it from more light-hearted zombie comedies like ''Shaun of the Dead'' where characters use the Z-word frequently. One character does however quote "They're coming to get you Barbara!" from ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so at least they aren't completely {{genre blind|ness}}.

to:

** The Source is the most powerful demon who rules the Underworld - -- don't call him "the Devil". To be fair it is a position rather than a single being, but then plenty of other works have used "the Devil" that way too.
* ''Series/DeadSet'' never uses the word zombie to describe its undead - -- writer Charlie Brooker wanted to distinguish it from more light-hearted zombie comedies like ''Shaun of the Dead'' where characters use the Z-word frequently. One character does however quote "They're coming to get you Barbara!" from ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so at least they aren't completely {{genre blind|ness}}.



** Midway through series 2 of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', [[spoiler: Owen is killed off]] and then revived through AppliedPhlebotinum. The show makes it quite clear that he's still technically dead: he has no metabolism, can't eat or drink, can't heal injuries, etc. And yet, despite all the references to him being a walking dead man, no-one once uses the word "zombie".

to:

** Midway through series Series 2 of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', [[spoiler: Owen is killed off]] and then revived through AppliedPhlebotinum. The show makes it quite clear that he's still technically dead: he has no metabolism, can't eat or drink, can't heal injuries, etc. And yet, despite all the references to him being a walking dead man, no-one once uses the word "zombie".



* Since it entered its eight edition, ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' now refers to the unit formerly called Plague Zombies as Poxwalkers. Probably for copyright reasons. ''TabletopGame/WarhammerAgeOfSigmar'' still refers to zombie units as zombies, but their sub-faction was named Deadwalkers.
** When ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' started off as ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyBattle'' RecycledInSpace, various factions had different treatment in naming. Elves became [[OurElvesAreDifferent Eldar]] (used by Tolkien as an alternative name for elves) and Orks simply [[XtremeKoolLetterz swapped their "c" for a "k"]], while Dwarves became [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Squats]]. This may have been deliberate, since Squats are mutated humans rather than actually aliens; Ogryn (ogres) and Ratlings (halflings) were also mutants and were given new names.

to:

* Since ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** The 2nd Edition of ''AD&D'' removed all references to demons (ChaoticEvil fiends from the Abyss), daemons (NeutralEvil fiends from Gehenna and Hades), and devils (LawfulEvil fiends from the Nine Hells), changing their respective names to "tanar'ri," "yugoloths," and "baatezu" to appease MoralGuardians. Later editions restored the terms "demon" and "devil" but kept "tanar'ri" and "baatezu" to refer to the dominant races of the Abyss and Nine Hells (although other types of demons and devils exist). "Yugoloth" stuck, probably since the old name "daemon" was too hard to distinguish from "demon". As one of narrators in "[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=5248 Hellbound: The Blood War]]" put it:
-->Most berks think that the Blood War's nothing more than the battle between dem -- no, wait. That ain't the right word. For one thing, it's a sure road to woe. Calling the fiends by the d-words is no better than insulting any other group of folks because of the way they look or act. Not only does
it entered infuriate them, it marks the speaker as a crass boor, someone to be shunned (or killed). Might as well call a bariaur a randy goat, or a slaad a slimy toad. It's a mark of ignorance, plain and simple, and it'll paint a body to be as Clueless as they come.\\
When speaking of the evil creatures that fight the Blood War, just call them "baatezu" and "tanar'ri", or "the fiends." Or [[TheScottishTrope call them nothing at all]]; that way, a body's not as likely to draw their attention.
** {{Treants}}, [[BigRedDevil balors]], and halflings got their names as a way of WritingAroundTrademarks; they're respectively based on the [[PlantPerson Ents]], [[OurDemonsAreDifferent Balrogs]], and {{hobbits}} of Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium.
* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' encountered [[MoralGuardians a similar problem]] as ''D&D'' did several years into
its eight edition, ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' rise to power; for many years, cards which depicted a horrible monster from the Underworld were "Beasts" or "Horrors" without fail, and never too closely resembled the demon stereotype. At about the same time, images such as "Unholy Strength"'s flaming pentagram disappeared, and this was later Handwaved as a choice to "avoid using real-world iconography in our fantasy universe". A few of the creature-type changes have since been Retconned. Lampshaded in Unglued, where Infernal Spawn of Evil has the type Demon crossed out with Beast scribbled in. (Wizards of the Coast have since realized that the game is popular enough to ignore such silliness, and demons now appear in almost every set. They even released a duel deck set for "Divine Vs. Demonic.")
* ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pandemic}} Pandemic: Legacy Season One]]'': Originally, the object of the game is to cure four diseases, but over time one of the disease mutates into [=COdA=], whose victims become {{Technically Living Zombie}}s called "the Faded".
* ''TabletopGame/RedMarkets'' euphemistically
refers to the unit formerly called Plague Zombies undead slow zombies as Poxwalkers. Probably for copyright reasons. ''TabletopGame/WarhammerAgeOfSigmar'' "Casualties", and the fast technically still refers to zombie units alive ones as zombies, but their sub-faction was named Deadwalkers.
** When ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' started off as ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyBattle'' RecycledInSpace, various factions had different treatment in naming. Elves became [[OurElvesAreDifferent Eldar]] (used by Tolkien as an alternative name for elves) and Orks simply [[XtremeKoolLetterz swapped their "c" for a "k"]], while Dwarves became [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Squats]]. This may have been deliberate, since Squats are mutated humans rather than actually aliens; Ogryn (ogres) and Ratlings (halflings) were also mutants and were given new names.
"Vectors".



* The roleplaying game ''TabletopGame/{{Victoriana|RPG}}'' is set in a 19th century alternate earth populated by dwarfs, orcs, dragons, magicians, vampires... and a race of [[OurElvesAreDIfferent long lived, magical, fae, nature loving, graceful pointy eared people]] called... "Eldren", and nothing but "Eldren". (the third edition of the game also adds a race of [[{{Hobbits}} small, jolly, stealthy, hairy footed, quick-witted people]] called... "Hulder")
* Since it entered its eighth edition, ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' now refers to the unit formerly called Plague Zombies as Poxwalkers. Probably for copyright reasons. ''TabletopGame/WarhammerAgeOfSigmar'' still refers to zombie units as zombies, but their sub-faction was named Deadwalkers.
** When ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' started off as ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyBattle'' RecycledInSpace, various factions had different treatment in naming. Elves became [[OurElvesAreDifferent Eldar]] (used by Tolkien as an alternative name for elves) and Orks simply [[XtremeKoolLetterz swapped their "c" for a "k"]], while Dwarves became [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Squats]]. This may have been deliberate, since Squats are mutated humans rather than actually aliens; Ogryn (ogres) and Ratlings (halflings) were also mutants and were given new names.



* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** The 2nd Edition of ''AD&D'' removed all references to demons (ChaoticEvil fiends from the Abyss), daemons (NeutralEvil fiends from Gehenna and Hades), and devils (LawfulEvil fiends from the Nine Hells), changing their respective names to "tanar'ri," "yugoloths," and "baatezu" to appease MoralGuardians. Later editions restored the terms "demon" and "devil" but kept "tanar'ri" and "baatezu" to refer to the dominant races of the Abyss and Nine Hells (although other types of demons and devils exist). "Yugoloth" stuck, probably since the old name "daemon" was too hard to distinguish from "demon". As one of narrators in "[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=5248 Hellbound: The Blood War]]" put it:
-->Most berks think that the Blood War's nothing more than the battle between dem -- no, wait. That ain't the right word. For one thing, it's a sure road to woe. Calling the fiends by the d-words is no better than insulting any other group of folks because of the way they look or act. Not only does it infuriate them, it marks the speaker as a crass boor, someone to be shunned (or killed). Might as well call a bariaur a randy goat, or a slaad a slimy toad. It's a mark of ignorance, plain and simple, and it'll paint a body to be as Clueless as they come.\\
When speaking of the evil creatures that fight the Blood War, just call them "baatezu" and "tanar'ri", or "the fiends." Or [[TheScottishTrope call them nothing at all]]; that way, a body's not as likely to draw their attention.
** {{Treants}}, [[BigRedDevil balors]], and halflings got their names as a way of WritingAroundTrademarks; they're respectively based on the [[PlantPerson Ents]], [[OurDemonsAreDifferent Balrogs]], and {{hobbits}} of Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium.
* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' encountered [[MoralGuardians a similar problem]] as ''D&D'' did several years into its rise to power; for many years, cards which depicted a horrible monster from the Underworld were "Beasts" or "Horrors" without fail, and never too closely resembled the demon stereotype. At about the same time, images such as "Unholy Strength"'s flaming pentagram disappeared, and this was later Handwaved as a choice to "avoid using real-world iconography in our fantasy universe". A few of the creature-type changes have since been Retconned. Lampshaded in Unglued, where Infernal Spawn of Evil has the type Demon crossed out with Beast scribbled in. (Wizards of the Coast have since realized that the game is popular enough to ignore such silliness, and demons now appear in almost every set. They even released a duel deck set for "Divine Vs. Demonic.")



* The roleplaying game ''TabletopGame/{{Victoriana|RPG}}'' is set in a 19th century alternate earth populated by dwarfs, orcs, dragons, magicians, vampires... and a race of [[OurElvesAreDIfferent long lived, magical, fae, nature loving, graceful pointy eared people]] called... "Eldren", and nothing but "Eldren". (the third edition of the game also adds a race of [[{{Hobbits}} small, jolly, stealthy, hairy footed, quick-witted people]] called... "Hulder")
* ''TabletopGame/RedMarkets'' euphemistically refers to the undead slow zombies as "Casualties", and the fast technically still alive ones as "Vectors".
* ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pandemic}} Pandemic: Legacy Season One]]'': Originally, the object of the game is to cure four diseases, but over time one of the disease mutates into [=COdA=], whose victims become {{Technically Living Zombie}}s called "the Faded".



* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' calls clones "replicas". This is justified in that the Replicas are not made with genetics, but by implanting "memories" and "data" into a featureless puppet, creating something akin to a Nobody. Otherwise, they are, for all intents and purposes, intended to be clones of a person.



* Another Creator/SquareEnix example, Humans in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant'' are called Mitras.



* Somewhat justified in ''Videogame/GrimDawn'', in that the walking corpses you see going around trying to murder people aren't actually undead; rather, they're corpses that Aetherial spirits picked up and possessed, and the shambling gait is due to imperfect control (they have an easier time with non-combative living hosts). There ''could'' be genuine zombies since genuine undead actually exist, but the undead you do find are either far too old to count as anything but skeletons, ghosts, or something far worse than just a zombie.



* Somewhat justified in ''Videogame/GrimDawn'', in that the walking corpses you see going around trying to murder people aren't actually undead; rather, they're corpses that Aetherial spirits picked up and possessed, and the shambling gait is due to imperfect control (they have an easier time with non-combative living hosts). There ''could'' be genuine zombies since genuine undead actually exist, but the undead you do find are either far too old to count as anything but skeletons, ghosts, or something far worse than just a zombie.



* ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' calls clones "replicas". This is justified in that the Replicas are not made with genetics, but by implanting "memories" and "data" into a featureless puppet, creating something akin to a Nobody. Otherwise, they are, for all intents and purposes, intended to be clones of a person.



* Another Creator/SquareEnix example, Humans in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant'' are called Mitras.



** Totally averted in all the rest of the pre-[=REmake=] games: ''Everyone'' calls them zombies without hesitation or qualification. Except for {{Ma|uveShirt}}rvin, who refers to them as [[ShapedLikeItself "zombie-like creatures"]] Most games that feature zombies made after [=REmake=] will have common folks refer to them as "monsters", while those with more knowledge will call them B.O.W.'s (Bio-Organic Weapons). This name is perhaps the only example sillier than the term zombie itself, seeing as biological and organic are synonyms, and saying BOW takes longer. Then again, it may be justified in that BOW encompasses more than just the humans--it includes the crocodile-like creatures, bats, snakes, etc. By the time of 4 and 5, as Capcom wanted to move away from the old "Romero-style slow zombies with a few mutated bosses" set up, they moved to the "normal people just converted by Las Plagas" approach. This also marked a GenreShift from survival horror to action, though ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' does ''very'' briefly bring Zombies back into the mix; and after going two games without them, it's actually surprising again when they grab you.
** ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilRevelations'' ditches the word "Zombie" almost completely, as Jill and Parker generally refer to the zombie-ish Oozes as simply "things" or "infected" - this gets rather odd, as none of the monsters they encounter have their actual names (i.e. Ooze, Sea Creeper, Scagdead) ever said. The only exceptions to the Z-word is when Jill calls Rachel a zombie.

to:

** Totally averted in all the rest of the pre-[=REmake=] games: ''Everyone'' calls them zombies without hesitation or qualification. Except for {{Ma|uveShirt}}rvin, who refers to them as [[ShapedLikeItself "zombie-like creatures"]] Most games that feature zombies made after [=REmake=] will have common folks refer to them as "monsters", while those with more knowledge will call them B.O.W.'s (Bio-Organic Weapons). This name is perhaps the only example sillier than the term zombie itself, seeing as biological and organic are synonyms, and saying BOW takes longer. Then again, it may be justified in that BOW encompasses more than just the humans--it humans -- it includes the crocodile-like creatures, bats, snakes, etc. By the time of 4 ''4'' and 5, ''5'', as Capcom wanted to move away from the old "Romero-style slow zombies with a few mutated bosses" set up, they moved to the "normal people just converted by Las Plagas" approach. This also marked a GenreShift from survival horror to action, though ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' does ''very'' briefly bring Zombies back into the mix; and after going two games without them, it's actually surprising again when they grab you.
** ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilRevelations'' ditches the word "Zombie" almost completely, as Jill and Parker generally refer to the zombie-ish Oozes as simply "things" or "infected" - -- this gets rather odd, as none of the monsters they encounter have their actual names (i.e. Ooze, Sea Creeper, Scagdead) ever said. The only exceptions to the Z-word is when Jill calls Rachel a zombie.



* ''Webcomic/BoyfriendOfTheDead'': Most humans avoid the word zombie, since [[ThisIsReality zombies aren't real]]. They prefer terms like "rotters," "biters," and "walkers." The zombies largely find this policy annoying, and N interrupts a human mob that is gearing up to tear him apart [[SkewedPriorities by insisting that they use the word zombie]].
* Lampshaded in ''Dead Metaphor'', a 'zombie comedy' webcomic. People call the undead 'zombies', but it's considered a politically-incorrect term, on par with calling someone a retard.
* Parodied in a one-comic diversion from the NSFW webcomic ''Delve'', as seen in the page image above. Bree then gives up and just ask for some water, to be informed that they only have "bottled sky juice".
* Subverted in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'':
-->'''[[http://www.egscomics.com/?date=2010-05-21 Susan]]:''' You know what? Screw it. It was a vampire. [...] Not really, but it was a monster that used to be human, hypnotized young women, and sucked blood out of their necks. It doesn't matter what I say. You two are going to hear ''"vampire"''.
** Eventually, aberrations (the official term in-comic) become referred to as "vampires" frequently, even though none are as obviously vampiric as the one mentioned above. Instead, we get [[BodySurf Body Surfers]], beings that literally eat humans, and so forth as "vampires".



** Robots are called "Clanks", ''never'' "robots". The real world owes the word "robot" solely to Czech author Karel Capek's play ''R.U.R.'' (from [[EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench Slovak]] "robota" = "labor"), and ''Girl Genius'' is set before it was written. (Also, Capek's "robots" are apparently biological creations rather than mechanical, which would make them--in Girl Genius terminology-- "Constructs" rather than "Clanks") Although the characters are all supposed to be speaking in German anyway, so Phil Foglio could "translate" it however he wanted.

to:

** Robots are called "Clanks", ''never'' "robots". The real world owes the word "robot" solely to Czech author Karel Capek's play ''R.U.R.'' (from [[EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench Slovak]] "robota" = "labor"), and ''Girl Genius'' is set before it was written. (Also, Capek's "robots" are apparently biological creations rather than mechanical, which would make them--in them -- in Girl Genius terminology-- terminology -- "Constructs" rather than "Clanks") Although the characters are all supposed to be speaking in German anyway, so Phil Foglio could "translate" it however he wanted.



* ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'' does this a couple of times with the "ghouls" [[spoiler:who were revealed to be aliens who adopted human forms]], and the "infected" (namely, infected with intelligence increasing insects that turn people into unusually feral geeks). Of course, it also includes straight-up, spelled-with-a-Z zombies on occasion, too, so the different names are probably to avoid confusion more than anything else. In one case, the Z-words are called "deadels" by the one who raised them. As one character argues, "Hey, when your world is ruled by an evil demon who wants to call its undead minions 'deadels', you call 'em 'deadels!'"



* Lampshaded in ''Dead Metaphor'', a 'zombie comedy' webcomic. People call the undead 'zombies', but it's considered a politically-incorrect term, on par with calling someone a retard.
* Subverted in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'':
-->'''[[http://www.egscomics.com/?date=2010-05-21 Susan]]:''' You know what? Screw it. It was a vampire. [...] Not really, but it was a monster that used to be human, hypnotized young women, and sucked blood out of their necks. It doesn't matter what I say. You two are going to hear ''"vampire"''.
** Eventually, aberrations (the official term in-comic) become referred to as "vampires" frequently, even though none are as obviously vampiric as the one mentioned above. Instead, we get [[BodySurf Body Surfers]], beings that literally eat humans, and so forth as "vampires".

to:

* Lampshaded in ''Dead Metaphor'', a 'zombie comedy' webcomic. People call The online furry comic/graphic novel ''[[http://www.vitenka.com/Rtd1/ Rework the undead 'zombies', but it's considered a politically-incorrect term, on par with calling someone a retard.
* Subverted in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'':
-->'''[[http://www.egscomics.com/?date=2010-05-21 Susan]]:''' You know what? Screw it. It was a vampire. [...] Not really, but it was a monster that used to be human, hypnotized young women,
Dead]]'' and sucked blood out of their necks. It doesn't matter what I say. You two are going to hear ''"vampire"''.
** Eventually, aberrations (the official term in-comic) become
its sequel, ''Rework the Dead II'', by David Hopkins, has zombies referred to as "vampires" frequently, even though none "Reworks" -- which makes sense as the dead are as obviously vampiric as reanimated immensely stronger, faster, incredibly violent and with claws and razor-sharp fangs ('''Warning:''' this "funny animal" comic is anything but cute and cuddly).
* ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'' does this a couple of times with the "ghouls" [[spoiler:who were revealed to be aliens who adopted human forms]], and the "infected" (namely, infected with intelligence increasing insects that turn people into unusually feral geeks). Of course, it also includes straight-up, spelled-with-a-Z zombies on occasion, too, so the different names are probably to avoid confusion more than anything else. In one case, the Z-words are called "deadels" by
the one mentioned above. Instead, we get [[BodySurf Body Surfers]], beings who raised them. As one character argues, "Hey, when your world is ruled by an evil demon who wants to call its undead minions 'deadels', you call 'em 'deadels!'"
* In ''Webcomic/StandStillStaySilent'', all the surviving nations being Scandinavian has lead to the general agreement
that literally eat humans, and so forth as "vampires"."troll" is a perfect name for a horribly mutated PlagueZombie.



* Parodied in a one-comic diversion from the NSFW webcomic ''Delve'', as seen in the page image above. Bree then gives up and just ask for some water, to be informed that they only have "bottled sky juice".
* In ''Webcomic/StandStillStaySilent'', all the surviving nations being Scandinavian has lead to the general agreement that "troll" is a perfect name for a horribly mutated PlagueZombie.
* ''Webcomic/BoyfriendOfTheDead'': Most humans avoid the word zombie, since [[ThisIsReality zombies aren't real]]. They prefer terms like "rotters," "biters," and "walkers." The zombies largely find this policy annoying, and N interrupts a human mob that is gearing up to tear him apart [[SkewedPriorities by insisting that they use the word zombie]].
* The online furry comic/graphic novel ''[[http://www.vitenka.com/Rtd1/ Rework the Dead]]'' and its sequel, ''Rework the Dead II'', by David Hopkins, has zombies referred to as "Reworks" -- which makes sense as the dead are reanimated immensely stronger, faster, incredibly violent and with claws and razor-sharp fangs ('''Warning:''' this "funny animal" comic is anything but cute and cuddly).



* ''Blog/HowToWriteBadlyWell'' [[http://writebadlywell.blogspot.com/2010/08/beat-around-bush.html parodies it.]]



* ''Blog/HowToWriteBadlyWell'' [[http://writebadlywell.blogspot.com/2010/08/beat-around-bush.html parodies it.]]



* The "Pallids" are the ''WebAnimation/{{Chadam}}'' universes' equivalent to Zombies, being gray, bone-thinned monsters that have lost all semblance of sanity and just want to swarm and feed on the living. They, in fact, were once normal people, who became Pallid after losing their creativity glands.
* PlayedForLaughs in Creator/TeamFourStar's ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' [[WebVideo/TFSAtTheTable campaign]]. After Creator/{{Lanipator}} [[CriticalFailure rolls a Natural 1]] on a Knowledge check about the undead, he decides to play it for comedy by having his character Wake be a FlatEarthAtheist who doesn't believe that the undead are real[[note]]Specifically he thinks they're just corpses controlled by magic like a puppet on strings, rather than being sentient animated beings[[/note]]. He went through some amusing mental gymnastics to justify his attitude, especially considering that shortly after this "revelation", the party met a friendly [[OurLichesAreDifferent lich]] sorcerer named Mr. Rattles. Later in the campaign it's explained that Wake is a {{Fanboy}} of the Ashdrakes, a family of {{Vampire Hunter}}s who released their adventures as a series of novels. He initially assumed that the books were fiction, but the party ended up actually meeting one of the Ashdrakes, who told Wake that everything they wrote really happened -- which '''finally''' leads to his realizing that the undead are real.



* ''WebVideo/LeftPOORDead'': The main characters are convinced that the zombies are actually poor people.



* ''WebVideo/LeftPOORDead'': The main characters are convinced that the zombies are actually poor people.
* The "Pallids" are the ''WebAnimation/{{Chadam}}'' universes' equivalent to Zombies, being gray, bone-thinned monsters that have lost all semblance of sanity and just want to swarm and feed on the living. They, in fact, were once normal people, who became Pallid after losing their creativity glands.
* PlayedForLaughs in Creator/TeamFourStar's ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' [[WebVideo/TFSAtTheTable campaign]]. After Creator/{{Lanipator}} [[CriticalFailure rolls a Natural 1]] on a Knowledge check about the undead, he decides to play it for comedy by having his character Wake be a FlatEarthAtheist who doesn't believe that the undead are real[[note]]Specifically he thinks they're just corpses controlled by magic like a puppet on strings, rather than being sentient animated beings[[/note]]. He went through some amusing mental gymnastics to justify his attitude, especially considering that shortly after this "revelation", the party met a friendly [[OurLichesAreDifferent lich]] sorcerer named Mr. Rattles. Later in the campaign it's explained that Wake is a {{Fanboy}} of the Ashdrakes, a family of {{Vampire Hunter}}s who released their adventures as a series of novels. He initially assumed that the books were fiction, but the party ended up actually meeting one of the Ashdrakes, who told Wake that everything they wrote really happened -- which '''finally''' leads to his realizing that the undead are real.



* In the Halloween episode of ''WesternAnimation/BubbleGuppies'' zombies are referred to as 'spooky monsters'. This is probably because the cartoon is aimed at preschoolers.
* PlayedForLaughs in a ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' episode where Angelica convinces Chuckie he's going to turn into a rhinoceros. Tommy refuses to say the word and keeps saying "one of those ''things''" instead.



* PlayedForLaughs in a ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' episode where Angelica convinces Chuckie he's going to turn into a rhinoceros. Tommy refuses to say the word and keeps saying "one of those ''things''" instead.
* In the Halloween episode of ''WesternAnimation/BubbleGuppies'' zombies are referred to as 'spooky monsters'. This is probably because the cartoon is aimed at preschoolers.



* People fighting to end slavery usually refer to it as "Human Trafficking", because most people don't take the concept of modern-day slavery seriously. Part of the reason for that is that the word slavery tends to imply that it's legally sanctioned. Human trafficking emphasizes the fact that it's done by criminals, like drug trafficking. This is the cornerstone to the issue, though there are other points. At the start of the American civil war, slaves that fled over to the union side were referred to in official reports and newspapers as "contraband". Because prior to the 13th Amendment, slavery was still legal under the US Constitution[[note]]and is still technically legal as a punishment for a crime[[/note]]. However, criminals resisting Federal authority (such raising an army against it!) [[BotheringByTheBook could have their "property" confiscated as "contraband".]]\\\

to:

* People fighting to end slavery usually refer to it as "Human Trafficking", because most people don't take the concept of modern-day slavery seriously. Part of the reason for that is that the word slavery tends to imply that it's legally sanctioned. Human trafficking emphasizes the fact that it's done by criminals, like drug trafficking. This is the cornerstone to the issue, though there are other points. At the start of the American civil war, Civil War, slaves that fled over to the union Union side were referred to in official reports and newspapers as "contraband". Because prior to the 13th Amendment, slavery was still legal under the US Constitution[[note]]and is still technically legal as a punishment for a crime[[/note]]. However, criminals resisting Federal authority (such raising an army against it!) [[BotheringByTheBook could have their "property" confiscated as "contraband".]]\\\


* People fighting to end slavery usually refer to it as "Human Trafficking", because most people don't take the concept of modern-day slavery seriously. Part of the reason for that is that the word slavery tends to imply that it's legally sanctioned. Human trafficking emphasizes the fact that it's done by criminals, like drug trafficking. This is the cornerstone to the issue, though there are other points. At the start of the American civil war, slaves that fled over to the union side were referred to in official reports and newspapers as "contraband". Because prior to the 13th Amendment, slavery was still legal under the US Constitution. However, criminals resisting Federal authority (such raising an army against it!) [[BotheringByTheBook could have their "property" confiscated as "contraband".]]\\\

to:

* People fighting to end slavery usually refer to it as "Human Trafficking", because most people don't take the concept of modern-day slavery seriously. Part of the reason for that is that the word slavery tends to imply that it's legally sanctioned. Human trafficking emphasizes the fact that it's done by criminals, like drug trafficking. This is the cornerstone to the issue, though there are other points. At the start of the American civil war, slaves that fled over to the union side were referred to in official reports and newspapers as "contraband". Because prior to the 13th Amendment, slavery was still legal under the US Constitution.Constitution[[note]]and is still technically legal as a punishment for a crime[[/note]]. However, criminals resisting Federal authority (such raising an army against it!) [[BotheringByTheBook could have their "property" confiscated as "contraband".]]\\\


* In Creator/StevenSpielberg's version of ''Film/WarOfTheWorlds'' the characters go out of their way to avoid describing the clearly alien invaders as "aliens", or even Martians although it is reasonable the characters couldn't figure they came from Mars. They are instead referred to as "terrorists" or just "them".

to:

* In Creator/StevenSpielberg's version of ''Film/WarOfTheWorlds'' the characters go out of their way to avoid describing the clearly alien invaders as "aliens", or even Martians although it is reasonable the characters couldn't figure they came from Mars. They are instead mistakenly referred to as "terrorists" or otherwise just "them".


* Very, very much averted in ''Webcomic/ZombieRanch''. Not only does the [[ShowWithinAShow in-universe show]] have the same title as the comic, the characters are constantly referring to the zombies as zombies. Justified by it being over twenty years since the dead first started to walk. There's no denying their everyday existence, so why make up new words?


Can also be a form of enforced GenreBlindness where it's implied that the reason no one uses the term is because in-universe the very ''concept'' of the living dead in general has never entered a single person's mind in the history of man.


One of the more GenreSavvy reasons is that [[TheUndead the walking dead]] technically ''[[YouKeepUsingThatWord aren't zombies]]''. The proper "zombie" is a person whose higher thought processes have been removed, leaving them under the sway of a master. This original zombie is usually the result of occult vodou magic. Some books, such as ''The Serpent and the Rainbow'', argue that vodou practitioners can create zombies through a combination of drugs and cultural beliefs. "P-zombies", or "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophical_zombie philosophical zombies]]", are even more convoluted persons who don't have any subjective "experience".

Because of the older meaning of "zombie", it would make sense not to call them that in works that take place before the Romero ''Living Dead'' films established them as monsters (and even Romero himself didn't originally call them zombies), but sometimes works in the past will call them that anyway.

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[[folder:Radio]]
* ''Radio/DimensionX'': In [[Recap/DimensionX02WithFoldedHands episode two]], adapted from Creator/JackWilliamson's "Literature/WithFoldedHands", Mr Underhill is very insistent that his wife call the machines "mechanicals", not "robots". She points out that there isn't any difference and he counters that it makes a lot of difference in advertising.
[[/folder]]

Added DiffLines:

* ''{{Film/Bit}}'': Subverted in that characters have no problem using the word "vampire," then played straight with Vlad, who, despite the mountain of evidence, is never actually called {{Literature/Dracula}}.

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[[folder:Theatre]]
* In ''Theatre/TheGuyWhoDidntLikeMusicals'', the people assimilated by the singing alien HiveMind aren't really given any name at all. There's one line in which Ted calls them "singing zombie motherfuckers", but for the most part, the survivors simply refer to the assimilated as "them".
[[/folder]]


* {{Downplayed|Trope}} in ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead''. The survivors call the zombies by a variety of names, includes "lurkers" and "roamers" (depending on the zombies' behavior) or simply "biters." They use the word "zombies" as well, but less frequently, because it's hard to take seriously.

to:

* {{Downplayed|Trope}} in ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead''. The survivors call the zombies by a variety of names, includes "lurkers" and "roamers" (depending on the zombies' behavior) or simply "biters." They use Unlike the TV adaptation, the word "zombies" as well, "zombie" exists, but less frequently, because it's is used only infrequently -- the characters admit they find their undead adversaries hard to take seriously.seriously when they're called that.

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* ''Film/GanjaAndHess'' doesn't use the word "vampire", putting the condition resulting from getting killed with a ceremonial dagger from the mythical African Myrthian tribe as "blood addiction". These addicts are pretty much immortal, though.


** Totally averted in all the rest of the pre-[=REmake=] games: ''Everyone'' calls them zombies without hesitation or qualification. Except for {{Ma|uveShirt}}rvin, who refers to them as [[ShapedLikeItself "zombie-like creatures"]]. Most games that feature zombies made after [=REmake=] will have common folks refer to them as "monsters", while those with more knowledge will call them B.O.W.'s (Bio-Organic Weapons). This name is perhaps the only example sillier than the term zombie itself, seeing as biological and organic are synonyms, and saying BOW takes longer. Then again, it may be justified in that BOW encompasses more than just the humans--it includes the crocodile-like creatures, bats, snakes, etc.
** Although they are the least zombie-like in the new series beginning with 4 and 5, as Capcom wanted to move away from the old "Romero-style slow zombies with a few mutated bosses" set up and moved to the "normal people just converted by Las Plagas" approach. This also marked a GenreShift from survival horror to action, though ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' does ''very'' briefly bring Zombies back into the mix; and after going two games without them, it's actually surprising again when they grab you.

to:

** Totally averted in all the rest of the pre-[=REmake=] games: ''Everyone'' calls them zombies without hesitation or qualification. Except for {{Ma|uveShirt}}rvin, who refers to them as [[ShapedLikeItself "zombie-like creatures"]]. creatures"]] Most games that feature zombies made after [=REmake=] will have common folks refer to them as "monsters", while those with more knowledge will call them B.O.W.'s (Bio-Organic Weapons). This name is perhaps the only example sillier than the term zombie itself, seeing as biological and organic are synonyms, and saying BOW takes longer. Then again, it may be justified in that BOW encompasses more than just the humans--it includes the crocodile-like creatures, bats, snakes, etc.
** Although they are
etc. By the least zombie-like in the new series beginning with time of 4 and 5, as Capcom wanted to move away from the old "Romero-style slow zombies with a few mutated bosses" set up and up, they moved to the "normal people just converted by Las Plagas" approach. This also marked a GenreShift from survival horror to action, though ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' does ''very'' briefly bring Zombies back into the mix; and after going two games without them, it's actually surprising again when they grab you.


Added DiffLines:

** The remakes of ''[[VideoGame/ResidentEvil2Remake 2]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/ResidentEvil3Remake 3]]'' bring back zombies in all their glory and the policy of averting this trope is back in full force, as everyone present says "zombie" with no embellishments. This includes Marvin, listed above.

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