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** ''Dual Strike'' has the Black Crystal: a property that restores 3HP to any nearby enemy unit for free. [[spoiler:They're actually a plot point explaining how Black Hole recovered so quickly after their last defeat.]]

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** ''Dual Strike'' has the Black Crystal: a property Black Hole installation that restores 3HP 2HP to any nearby enemy unit for free.free along with maxing out their fuel and ammo. [[spoiler:They're actually a plot point explaining how Black Hole recovered so quickly after their last defeat.]] In the same game is [[spoiler:The Black Obelisk, which does the same thing that Black Crystals do but over a larger area.]]



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* ''VideoGame/WarGroove'' takes a TropesAreTools approach. The Campaign goes for a "challenge over fairness" paradigm, such as giving the AI free units when the mission suits it, but the part of the difficulty setting is adjusting how fair the player wants to be, scaling their own income up or down. This is also pretty much all the difficulty setting in Arcade mode changes, with Easy giving the AI only 50% income, Normal being fair, and Hard giving them double income.


This is a common form of [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating]] in strategy games (FourX in particular). Since the player is generally much smarter than the computer, the designers compensate by giving the AI player(s) an unfair ability [[YouRequireMoreVespeneGas to gain or gather resources]] in order that the enemy will actually pose a challenge to the player.

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This is a common form of [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard cheating]] in strategy games (FourX in particular). Since the player is generally much smarter than the computer, the designers compensate by giving the [[VideoGameAI AI player(s) player(s)]] an unfair ability [[YouRequireMoreVespeneGas to gain or gather resources]] in order that the enemy will actually pose a challenge to the player.


* ''VideoGame/{{Aerobiz}}'': The game does this and [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules makes its own rules]] in one stroke. If your airline runs in the red for a year, it goes bankrupt and [[NonStandardGameOver you lose]]. If an AI airline runs in the red for a year, it goes bankrupt, changes its name and gets a huge influx of cash to start over and bounce back.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Aerobiz}}'': The game does this and [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules makes its own rules]] in one stroke. If your airline runs in the red for a year, it goes bankrupt and [[NonStandardGameOver you lose]]. If an AI airline runs in the red for a year, it goes bankrupt, changes its name and gets a huge influx of cash to start over and bounce back. This is fixed in ''Supersonic'', where AI airlines that go bankrupt do not get a name change and cash injection and instead are eliminated just like player-run airlines would be.


* In several ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' titles (''Videogame/FinalFantasyV'' immediately comes to mind, but this trope exists in other titles of the franchise), boss encounters either have an absurdly huge (as in, the maximum number that can be stored in memory) MP pool, or simply have boss-exclusive abilities that can be spammed for free, making it all but impossible to shut them down using MP-drain abilities.

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* In several ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' titles (''Videogame/FinalFantasyV'' immediately comes to mind, but this trope exists in other titles of the franchise), boss encounters either have an absurdly huge (as in, the maximum number that can be stored in memory) MP pool, or simply have boss-exclusive abilities that can be spammed for free, making it all but impossible to shut them down using MP-drain abilities. The first game in the series where it was even possible to stop a foe from using spells by depleting their MP was ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' (and even then, several monsters have 0 MP special abilities).
** In the first three games in the series, enemies simply didn't have magic points - they could spam any spell they knew at will.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyBraveExvius'' approaches this in a different direction - while enemies all have mana pools sensibly related to the type of foe they are (animalistic monsters having nearly none, more trained and intelligent foes having more, spellcasters having the most), it's moot because the enemies don't consume magic points at all to use their spells and abilities - this is most obvious in the various fights against the Sworn Six in the first season, as they'll continue to use -aga level attack spells (which would cost the player 20 MP per cast) even if their magic points have been zeroed out. The main reason they have limits on their magic points is so that the player cannot have infinite magic points by repeatedly using [[ManaDrain Osmose or related abilities]].


* ''Videogame/TeamFortress2'': The robots in Mann Vs. Machine mode all have BottomlessMagazines, but to keep things fair(ish) any weapon with a clip in it will have the same default clip size as you and thus they have to periodically stop to reload...except for the GiantMook versions, whose level of [[MoreDakka bullet]]/[[MacrossMissileMassacre rocket]]/GrenadeSpam are enough to make you weak at the knees.

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* ''Videogame/TeamFortress2'': The robots in Mann Vs. Machine mode all have BottomlessMagazines, but to keep things fair(ish) any weapon with a clip in it will have the same default clip size as you and thus they have to periodically stop to reload...except for the GiantMook versions, whose level levels of [[MoreDakka bullet]]/[[MacrossMissileMassacre rocket]]/GrenadeSpam are enough to make you weak at the knees.


* VideoGame/MachinesWiredForWar::The computer can build units without resources. (Resource consumption is real-time rather than paid at once at the beginning. For the computer, production goes on even at 0 BMU's while it stops for a human player. This doesn't affect building construction, however.) It can place building blueprints without paying the 5 BMU placement cost. It can launch a nuke for free while it normally costs 500 BMU's.

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* VideoGame/MachinesWiredForWar::The VideoGame/MachinesWiredForWar:The computer can build units without resources. (Resource consumption is real-time rather than paid at once at the beginning. For the computer, production goes on even at 0 BMU's while it stops for a human player. This doesn't affect building construction, however.) It can place building blueprints without paying the 5 BMU placement cost. It can launch a nuke for free while it normally costs 500 BMU's.




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* The AI in VideoGame/{{Stellaris}}, as of version 2.0, has been confirmed to have its maintenance and civilian good costs halved on difficulties at least as low as normal, as well as receiving some additional bonus to energy income.


* In SidMeier's original ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the player's civilization must devote immense amounts of resources to building one of the Seven Wonders of the World; your AI opponents, on the other hand, do not actually 'build' these but simply have a random chance (minute, but significant in the long run) of being awarded one each turn. This goes above and beyond the usual accelerated-build advantage of strategy games because ''only one civilization ever'' can build any given Wonder - so the AI not only gets a free toy, but may ruin your own investment.

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* In SidMeier's Creator/SidMeier's original ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'', the player's civilization must devote immense amounts of resources to building one of the Seven Wonders of the World; your AI opponents, on the other hand, do not actually 'build' these but simply have a random chance (minute, but significant in the long run) of being awarded one each turn. This goes above and beyond the usual accelerated-build advantage of strategy games because ''only one civilization ever'' can build any given Wonder - so the AI not only gets a free toy, but may ruin your own investment.


* The AI in ActOfWar will periodically be granted $500. You can test this by destroying everything it has except for its headquarters. It will produce construction vehicles indefinitely.

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* The AI in ActOfWar ''VideoGame/ActOfWar'' will periodically be granted $500. You can test this by destroying everything it has except for its headquarters. It will produce construction vehicles indefinitely.


* The Ancient Greece themed RTS ''Rise and Fall: Civilizations at War'' features an AI that will appear to collect resources but will really have an infinite supply. At the higher difficulty levels, once an AI's main base is destroyed it is not uncommon for it's remaining production facility to pump out an endless supply of it's most powerful units despite not having any legitimate incoming resources.

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* The Ancient Greece themed RTS ''Rise and Fall: Civilizations at War'' ''VideoGame/RiseAndFallCivilizationsAtWar'' features an AI that will appear to collect resources but will really have an infinite supply. At the higher difficulty levels, once an AI's main base is destroyed it is not uncommon for it's remaining production facility to pump out an endless supply of it's most powerful units despite not having any legitimate incoming resources.

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** In ''V'', the AI even starts with considerably more than you on higher difficulties. The player always starts with a Settler and a Warrior, but the AI on Deity starts with three Warriors, a Scout, two Workers, and two Settlers.

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** This can also be built into a map using boon-granting events that explicitly only affect computer players, which will apply on all difficulty levels. And of course, if you play such a map on a higher difficulty level, [[UpToEleven the computer will get]] ''[[UpToEleven both]]'' [[UpToEleven bonuses]]. The developers [[LampshadeHanging lampshade it]] in the built-in maps with flavor text like "[=FedEx=] for computer!" that [[EasterEgg can only be seen if you poke around the maps using the editor]].


*** In the campaign missions, the AI often has infinite resources (sometimes not even having a refinery) and can simply spam units nonstop until you destroy its production facilities.

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*** In many of the campaign missions, the AI often has infinite resources cash (sometimes not even having a refinery) and can simply spam units nonstop until you destroy its production facilities.base. The only thing that prevents you from being crushed is the scripted nature of the missions, and the fact that the AI doesn't know how to mount a strong attack, sending units towards you in small groups instead.


** The first one compensates for it's [[ArtificialStupidity laughable AI]] by almost always outnumbering you nearly 2 to 1 with enemy units and properties.

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** The first one compensates for it's its [[ArtificialStupidity laughable AI]] by almost always outnumbering you nearly 2 to 1 with enemy units and properties.


* ''AIWarFleetCommand'' has the AI draw resources from a separate pool, where it warps in reinforcements and units.

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* ''AIWarFleetCommand'' ''VideoGame/AIWarFleetCommand'' has the AI draw resources from a separate pool, where it warps in reinforcements and units.

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