Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / NewspaperComics

Go To



* NewspaperComicsOfThe2000s

to:

* NewspaperComicsOfThe2000sComicStripsOfThe2000s

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/{{Arrowhead}}


* ComicStrip/MaxFinderMystery (published in ''Magazine/{{OWL}}'')

to:

* ComicStrip/MaxFinderMystery (published in ''Magazine/{{OWL}}'')ComicStrip/MaxFinderMystery


* ComicStrip/MaxFinderMystery (published in ''Magazine/{{OWL}}'')



* Webcomic/{{Mulberry}} (originally a webcomic, started appearing in ''BANG! Magazine'' in 2012)



* ComicStrip/SouthernFriedFugitives (actually appeared in ''Magazine/{{Nickelodeon Magazine}}'')



* ComicStrip/SpyVsSpy
* ComicStrip/StarFox (published in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'')



* ComicStrip/WhatsNewWithPhilAndDixie


Added DiffLines:


!!Magazine Comics with pages:
* ComicStrip/MaxFinderMystery (published in ''Magazine/{{OWL}}'')
* Webcomic/{{Mulberry}} (originally a webcomic, started appearing in ''BANG! Magazine'' in 2012)
* ComicStrip/SouthernFriedFugitives (appeared in ''Magazine/{{Nickelodeon Magazine}}'')
* ComicStrip/StarFox (published in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'')
* ComicStrip/SpyVsSpy
* ComicStrip/WhatsNewWithPhilAndDixie

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/MaxFinderMystery (published in ''Magazine/{{OWL}}'')

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/LucyAndSophieSayGoodBye

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/{{Jucika}}


As a result of their financial woes, newspapers have also been cutting down on the amount of space that comic strip artists are given in which to practice their visual, art-based medium, resulting in simpler art and abbreviated storytelling.[[note]]As Bill Watterson of ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' fame [[http://ignatz.brinkster.net/ccomicsjournal.html said]] of the space restrictions way back in 1989: "A beautiful strip like ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' would be impossible to read at today's sizes." Things only got worse after 1990 with the decline of the medium's popularity (in the 1970s and 80s, Sunday comic sections had at least eight pages, while by the 2010s, most Sunday funnies have only four pages, a fourth of the average 16-page comic section in 1940[[note]]Actually ''less'', as modern newspapers are quite scrawny compared to their mid-century counterparts[[/note]]), becoming one of the factors that led to Watterson's decision to stop doing the strip. Along with a lot of the other stuff mentioned here.[[/note]] Compare and contrast the InfiniteCanvas and complete lack of censorship offered by WebComics as a medium. And the newspaper itself has become a victim of the Information Age; not only can consumers get the news online, they can get ''comics'' online too.

to:

As a result of their financial woes, newspapers have also been cutting down on the amount of space that comic strip artists are given in which to practice their visual, art-based medium, resulting in simpler art and abbreviated storytelling.[[note]]As Bill Watterson of ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' fame [[http://ignatz.brinkster.net/ccomicsjournal.html said]] of the space restrictions way back in 1989: "A beautiful strip like ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' would be impossible to read at today's sizes." Things only got worse after 1990 with the decline of the medium's popularity (in the 1970s and 80s, Sunday comic sections had at least eight pages, while by the 2010s, most Sunday funnies have only four pages, ''less than a fourth of quarter'' than the average 16-page comic section in 1940[[note]]Actually ''less'', as modern big newspapers had in 1940, for modern papers are quite scrawny compared to their mid-century counterparts[[/note]]), counterparts), becoming one of the factors that led to Watterson's decision to stop doing the strip. Along with a lot of the other stuff mentioned here.[[/note]] Compare and contrast the InfiniteCanvas and complete lack of censorship offered by WebComics as a medium. And the newspaper itself has become a victim of the Information Age; not only can consumers get the news online, they can get ''comics'' online too.


Compared to other media, newspaper comics can have incredibly [[LongRunners long tenures]]. New ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' strips appeared daily for over 49 years. ''ComicStrip/{{Doonesbury}}'' has been running since 1970 and ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' has been coming out since 1978. Neither show any signs of stopping. Even more impressively, ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' has run ''since 1930'', ''ComicStrip/GasolineAlley'' has run '''since 1918''', and most impressively of all ''ComicStrip/TheKatzenjammerKids'' ran for '''''109 years''''' (from 1897 to 2006)! While traditionally, a 10-year run was considered tremendous for a television show, when ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', ''ComicStrip/TheFarSide'', ''ComicStrip/BloomCounty'' and ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' each ended production after around a decade, it seemed far too soon.

to:

Compared to other media, newspaper comics can have incredibly [[LongRunners long tenures]]. New ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' strips appeared daily for over 49 years. ''ComicStrip/{{Doonesbury}}'' has been running since 1970 and ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' has been coming out since 1978. Neither show any signs of stopping. Even more impressively, ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' has run ''since 1930'', ''ComicStrip/GasolineAlley'' has run '''since 1918''', and most impressively of all ''ComicStrip/TheKatzenjammerKids'' ran for '''''109 years''''' (from 1897 to 2006)! While traditionally, a 10-year run was considered tremendous for a television show, when ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', ''ComicStrip/TheFarSide'', ''ComicStrip/BloomCounty'' and ''ComicStrip/TheBoondocks'' each ended production after around a decade, it seemed far too soon.
soon (let alone ''ComicStrip/CulDeSac'', which ran for ''barely five years'').



The downside is that, since the 1990s, newspaper comics went from being an American institution to become [[SnarkBait a byword for stodgy humor]] (particularly in the Web, including ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'', ''WebVideo/ThePunchline'' and Wondermark's Comic Strip Doctor), with LongRunners being regarded as [[JumpTheShark not being funny anymore, if they ever were]], derisively described as "zombie strips". One of the chief reasons comics haven't adapted to [[ValuesDissonance the more cynical comedy tastes of the 21st century (or non-English-speaking countries)]], being seemingly stuck with the tired jokes and premises associated with 50s/60s-era sitcoms lies in the fact newspapers see features as a means of attracting readers in general (while, since the 1990s, the rule has been [[PanderingToTheBase the exact opposite]], especially as comedy goes). Thus, DarkerAndEdgier humor, political- and/or current-events-based humor must be handled carefully, lest they cost more subscriptions than they gain (this counts for both the paper ''and'' the artist), especially considering that in the English-speaking world, newspapers are forbidden by stylebook from printing anything more "offensive" than "hell" (except in special cases, but these ''never'' apply to the funnies). And, like in the case of animated shows, a newspaper strip can be written even ten ''months'' in advance of print date, which doesn't help topical humor (political strips are often done six weeks in advance, although it's still a long time). Ironically, in its early years (1890s-1910s), the medium was associated with "yellow journalism"[[note]]This was the key reason ''[[UsefulNotes/AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'' never ran "funny pages"--unless you count a short-lived section on their Sunday magazine called ''The Funny Pages''--ironically, all of the featured works were incredibly tragic[[/note]].

to:

The downside is that, since the 1990s, newspaper comics went from being an American institution read by millions to become [[SnarkBait a byword for stodgy humor]] mainly read (at least as the stereotype goes) by the old fogeys who still read newspapers these days (particularly in the Web, including ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'', ''WebVideo/ThePunchline'' and Wondermark's Comic Strip Doctor), with LongRunners being regarded as [[JumpTheShark not being funny anymore, if they ever were]], derisively described as "zombie strips". One of the chief reasons comics haven't adapted to [[ValuesDissonance the more cynical comedy tastes of the 21st century (or non-English-speaking countries)]], being seemingly stuck with the tired jokes and premises associated with 50s/60s-era sitcoms lies in the fact newspapers see features as a means of attracting readers in general (while, since the 1990s, the rule has been [[PanderingToTheBase the exact opposite]], especially as comedy goes). Thus, DarkerAndEdgier humor, political- and/or current-events-based humor must be handled carefully, lest they cost more subscriptions than they gain (this counts for both the paper ''and'' the artist), especially considering that in the English-speaking world, newspapers are forbidden by stylebook from printing anything more "offensive" than "hell" (except in special cases, but these ''never'' apply to the funnies). And, like in the case of animated shows, a newspaper strip can be written even ten ''months'' in advance of print date, which doesn't help topical humor (political strips are often done six weeks in advance, although it's still a long time). Ironically, in its early years (1890s-1910s), the medium was associated with the raucous "yellow journalism"[[note]]This journalism" of Hearst and Pulitzer[[note]]This was the key reason ''[[UsefulNotes/AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'' never ran "funny pages"--unless you count a short-lived section on their Sunday magazine called ''The Funny Pages''--ironically, all of the featured works were incredibly tragic[[/note]].



As a result of their financial woes, newspapers have also been cutting down on the amount of space that comic strip artists are given in which to practice their visual, art-based medium, resulting in simpler art and abbreviated storytelling.[[note]]As Bill Watterson of ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' fame [[http://ignatz.brinkster.net/ccomicsjournal.html said]] of the space restrictions way back in 1989: "A beautiful strip like ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' would be impossible to read at today's sizes." Things only got worse after 1990 with the decline of the medium's popularity (in the 1970s and 80s, Sunday comic sections had at least eight pages, while by the 2010s, most Sunday funnies have only four pages), becoming one of the factors that led to Watterson's decision to stop doing the strip. Along with a lot of the other stuff mentioned here.[[/note]] Compare and contrast the InfiniteCanvas and complete lack of censorship offered by WebComics as a medium. And the newspaper itself has become a victim of the Information Age; not only can consumers get the news online, they can get ''comics'' online too..

to:

As a result of their financial woes, newspapers have also been cutting down on the amount of space that comic strip artists are given in which to practice their visual, art-based medium, resulting in simpler art and abbreviated storytelling.[[note]]As Bill Watterson of ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' fame [[http://ignatz.brinkster.net/ccomicsjournal.html said]] of the space restrictions way back in 1989: "A beautiful strip like ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' would be impossible to read at today's sizes." Things only got worse after 1990 with the decline of the medium's popularity (in the 1970s and 80s, Sunday comic sections had at least eight pages, while by the 2010s, most Sunday funnies have only four pages), pages, a fourth of the average 16-page comic section in 1940[[note]]Actually ''less'', as modern newspapers are quite scrawny compared to their mid-century counterparts[[/note]]), becoming one of the factors that led to Watterson's decision to stop doing the strip. Along with a lot of the other stuff mentioned here.[[/note]] Compare and contrast the InfiniteCanvas and complete lack of censorship offered by WebComics as a medium. And the newspaper itself has become a victim of the Information Age; not only can consumers get the news online, they can get ''comics'' online too..
too.

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/GnormGnat

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/LanceLawson


Actually, one of the reasons why {{Webcomics}} have gotten a lead over Web-based indie music distribution (let alone non-corporate Web movies) is that "making it big" in sequential art has been traditionally defined as "being able to support a middle-class lifestyle without a day job". Actually, many top cartoonists got stinking rich (for instance, ''Bringing Up Father'''s George [=MacManus=] was able to make a fortune, lose it after the 1929 crash, and become even richer) and even reached ''stardom'' in some cases, at the same time keeping a sense of anonymity most celebs wouldn't dream of.

to:

Actually, one of the reasons why {{Webcomics}} have gotten a lead over Web-based indie music distribution (let alone non-corporate Web movies) is that "making it big" in sequential art has been traditionally defined as "being able to support a middle-class lifestyle without a day job". Actually, many top cartoonists got stinking rich (for instance, ''Bringing Up Father'''s George [=MacManus=] was able to make a fortune, lose it after the 1929 crash, and become even richer) and even reached ''stardom'' in some cases, at the same time keeping a sense degree of anonymity most celebs wouldn't dream of.


The downside is that, since the 1990s, newspaper comics went from being an American institution to become [[SnarkBait a byword for stodgy humor]] (particularly in the Web, including ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'' and ''WebVideo/ThePunchline.''), with LongRunners being regarded as [[JumpTheShark not being funny anymore, if they ever were]], derisively described as "zombie strips". One of the chief reasons comics haven't adapted to more cynical comedy tastes, being seemingly stuck with the tired jokes and premises that 50s/60s-era sitcoms were fond of lies in the fact newspapers see features as a means of attracting readers. Thus, DarkerAndEdgier humor, political- and/or current-events-based humor must be handled carefully, lest they cost more subscriptions than they gain (this counts for both the paper ''and'' the artist), especially considering that in the English-speaking world, newspapers are forbidden by stylebook from printing anything more "offensive" than "hell" (except in special cases, but these ''never'' apply to the funnies). And, like in the case of animated shows, a newspaper strip can be written even ten ''months'' in advance of print date, which doesn't help topical humor (political strips are often done six weeks in advance, although it's still a long time). Ironically, in its early years (1890s-1910s), the medium was associated with "yellow journalism"[[note]]This was the key reason ''[[UsefulNotes/AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'' never ran "funny pages"--unless you count a short-lived section on their Sunday magazine called ''The Funny Pages''--ironically, all of the featured works were incredibly tragic[[/note]].

to:

The downside is that, since the 1990s, newspaper comics went from being an American institution to become [[SnarkBait a byword for stodgy humor]] (particularly in the Web, including ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'' ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'', ''WebVideo/ThePunchline'' and ''WebVideo/ThePunchline.''), Wondermark's Comic Strip Doctor), with LongRunners being regarded as [[JumpTheShark not being funny anymore, if they ever were]], derisively described as "zombie strips". One of the chief reasons comics haven't adapted to [[ValuesDissonance the more cynical comedy tastes, tastes of the 21st century (or non-English-speaking countries)]], being seemingly stuck with the tired jokes and premises that associated with 50s/60s-era sitcoms were fond of lies in the fact newspapers see features as a means of attracting readers.readers in general (while, since the 1990s, the rule has been [[PanderingToTheBase the exact opposite]], especially as comedy goes). Thus, DarkerAndEdgier humor, political- and/or current-events-based humor must be handled carefully, lest they cost more subscriptions than they gain (this counts for both the paper ''and'' the artist), especially considering that in the English-speaking world, newspapers are forbidden by stylebook from printing anything more "offensive" than "hell" (except in special cases, but these ''never'' apply to the funnies). And, like in the case of animated shows, a newspaper strip can be written even ten ''months'' in advance of print date, which doesn't help topical humor (political strips are often done six weeks in advance, although it's still a long time). Ironically, in its early years (1890s-1910s), the medium was associated with "yellow journalism"[[note]]This was the key reason ''[[UsefulNotes/AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'' never ran "funny pages"--unless you count a short-lived section on their Sunday magazine called ''The Funny Pages''--ironically, all of the featured works were incredibly tragic[[/note]].

Added DiffLines:

* ComicStrip/{{Jon}}


Actually, one of the reasons why {{Webcomics}} have gotten a lead over Web-based indie music distribution (let alone non-corporate Web movies) is that "making it big" in sequential art has been traditionally defined as "being able to support a middle-class lifestyle without a day job". Actually, many top cartoonists got stinking rich (for instance, ''Bringing Up Father'''s George [=MacManus=] was able to make a fortune, lose it after the 1929 crash, and become even richer) and even reached ''stardom'' in some cases (with Charles Schulz, Jim Davis and Al Capp being the most obvious examples).

The downside is that, since the 1990s, newspaper comics went from being an American institution to become [[SnarkBait a byword for stodgy humor]] (particularly in the Web, including ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'' and ''WebVideo/ThePunchline.''), with LongRunners being regarded as [[JumpTheShark not being funny anymore, if they ever were]], derisively described as "zombie strips". One of the chief reasons comics haven't adapted to more cynical comedy tastes, being seemingly stuck with the tired jokes and premises that 50s/60s-era sitcoms were fond of lies in the fact newspapers see features as a means of attracting readers. Thus, DarkerAndEdgier humor, political- and/or current-events-based humor must be handled carefully, lest they cost more subscriptions than they gain (this counts for both the paper ''and'' the artist), especially considering that in the English-speaking world, newspapers are forbidden by stylebook from printing anything more "offensive" than "hell" (except in special cases, but these ''never'' apply to the funnies). And, like in the case of animated shows, a newspaper strip can be written even ten ''months'' in advance of print date, which doesn't help topical humor (political strips are often done six weeks in advance, although it's still a long time).

to:

Actually, one of the reasons why {{Webcomics}} have gotten a lead over Web-based indie music distribution (let alone non-corporate Web movies) is that "making it big" in sequential art has been traditionally defined as "being able to support a middle-class lifestyle without a day job". Actually, many top cartoonists got stinking rich (for instance, ''Bringing Up Father'''s George [=MacManus=] was able to make a fortune, lose it after the 1929 crash, and become even richer) and even reached ''stardom'' in some cases (with Charles Schulz, Jim Davis and Al Capp being cases, at the same time keeping a sense of anonymity most obvious examples).

celebs wouldn't dream of.

The downside is that, since the 1990s, newspaper comics went from being an American institution to become [[SnarkBait a byword for stodgy humor]] (particularly in the Web, including ''Blog/TheComicsCurmudgeon'' and ''WebVideo/ThePunchline.''), with LongRunners being regarded as [[JumpTheShark not being funny anymore, if they ever were]], derisively described as "zombie strips". One of the chief reasons comics haven't adapted to more cynical comedy tastes, being seemingly stuck with the tired jokes and premises that 50s/60s-era sitcoms were fond of lies in the fact newspapers see features as a means of attracting readers. Thus, DarkerAndEdgier humor, political- and/or current-events-based humor must be handled carefully, lest they cost more subscriptions than they gain (this counts for both the paper ''and'' the artist), especially considering that in the English-speaking world, newspapers are forbidden by stylebook from printing anything more "offensive" than "hell" (except in special cases, but these ''never'' apply to the funnies). And, like in the case of animated shows, a newspaper strip can be written even ten ''months'' in advance of print date, which doesn't help topical humor (political strips are often done six weeks in advance, although it's still a long time). Ironically, in its early years (1890s-1910s), the medium was associated with "yellow journalism"[[note]]This was the key reason ''[[UsefulNotes/AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'' never ran "funny pages"--unless you count a short-lived section on their Sunday magazine called ''The Funny Pages''--ironically, all of the featured works were incredibly tragic[[/note]].

Showing 15 edit(s) of 116

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report