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* To protest against [[CorruptCorporateExecutive SOPA and PIPA,]] Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} blacked out their website on January 18, 2012. Wikipedia is notable for staying as TrueNeutral as possible, making this a ''huge'' change in their policy. Ironically enough, they had to break their own neutrality in order to fight for the principle of neutrality.

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* To protest against [[CorruptCorporateExecutive SOPA and PIPA,]] PIPA,]][[note]]The Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act, respectively. Both were laws proposed by the US Congress in 2012. They would have allowed companies to effectively remove websites from the internet by blocking any access through search engines or internet providers, by simply making a complaint to the US Department of Justice. Both laws were criticised for giving website owners little, if any, opportunity to defend themselves.[[/note]] Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} blacked out their website on January 18, 2012. Wikipedia is notable for staying as TrueNeutral as possible, making this a ''huge'' change in their policy. Ironically enough, they had to break their own neutrality in order to fight for the principle of neutrality.


** The DLC Far Harbor also has this: [[spoiler: During the main quest line, you can choose to kill the citizens of Far Harbor by unleashing the island's creatures on them. You can grant the Children of Atom "Division" by launching the nuke in their submarine base. You can also choose to turn Far Harbor against Acadia. Or you can just kill all of them, YouBastard. There's a peaceful option, too: killing the Children of Atom leader and replacing him with a synth. However, that's exactly what DiMA, Acadia's leader, did to Far Harbor: killed the town leader and replaced her with a synth. If you convince DiMa to wipe out one of the sides he'll admit that he can't stay neutral in the conflict any longer.]]

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** The DLC Far Harbor also has this: [[spoiler: During the main quest line, you can choose to kill the citizens of Far Harbor by unleashing the island's creatures on them. You can grant the Children of Atom "Division" by launching the nuke in their submarine base. You can also choose to turn Far Harbor against Acadia. Or you can just kill all of them, YouBastard. There's a peaceful option, too: killing the Children of Atom leader and replacing him with a synth. However, that's exactly what DiMA, [=DiMA=], Acadia's leader, did to Far Harbor: killed the town leader and replaced her with a synth. If you convince DiMa [=DiMA=] to wipe out one of the sides he'll admit that he can't stay neutral in the conflict any longer.]]

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** The allied races of ''Battle for Azeroth'' have this at play with previous neutral factions such as the Nightborne and the Highmountain Tauren joining the Horde and the Lightforged Draenei of the Army of Light and the Mechagnomes of Mechagon joining the Alliance.

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* In ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'', Helena [[spoiler: intervenes in the confrontation between Voltaire, Elliot, and the Griffins]] because she's tired of just letting events unfold.


** This serves as an allegory for pretty much the entirety of the occupation. The insurgents have had much, ''much'' less concern for innocent life, detonating devices in near schools, restaurants, and other public places. This has led to a lot of the civilians siding with the occupation forces.
* Really, this trope has pretty much been America's [[PlanetOfHats Hat]]. Examples:
** The U.S. sat out the Cuban rebellion against Spain for about fifteen years until the USS ''Maine'' blew up in Havana Harbor[[note]][[SubvertedTrope possibly accidentally from a fire breaking out in a coal bunker, not from enemy action]][[/note]], which got the U.S. into [[UsefulNotes/SpanishAmericanWar the war against Spain]].

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** This serves as an allegory for pretty much the entirety of the occupation. The insurgents have had much, ''much'' less concern for innocent life, detonating devices in near schools, restaurants, and other public places. This has led to a lot of the civilians siding with the occupation forces.
* Really, this trope has pretty much been America's [[PlanetOfHats Hat]]. hat.]] Examples:
** The U.S. sat out the Cuban rebellion against Spain for about fifteen years until the USS ''Maine'' blew up in Havana Harbor[[note]][[SubvertedTrope possibly accidentally from a fire breaking out in a coal bunker, not from enemy action]][[/note]], which got the U.S. into [[UsefulNotes/SpanishAmericanWar the war against Spain]].Spain.]]



** When the Cold War began, the Truman administration was quite indifferent to what happened in mainland east Asia, cutting off aid to Chiang Kai-shek and the KMT in the critical year of 1946, and then, after the Communists took over China, withdrawing American forces from Korea and declaring South Korea to be outside the American "defense perimeter in Asia." When the North Koreans then promptly invaded South Korea with Soviet and Chinese backing, the U.S. intervened on the South Korean side.
** When Lyndon Johnson became President, he declared that he was "not going to send American boys halfway around the world to do a job that Asian boys can and should do for themselves." When it became apparent in 1965 that South Vietnam was months if not weeks from falling to the Communists, however, ''and'' Communist forces fired on a U.S. naval vessel in the Gulf of Tonkin, he did exactly that.
** Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. was largely neutral in the Arab-Israeli conflict until the early 1970s, and did not, for example, intervene to open the Strait of Tiran in 1967 despite an earlier promise to do so. But when during the Yom Kippur War of 1973, the Soviet Union sent a massive airlift of supplies to the Egyptians and the Syrians, the Nixon administration decided to send an American airlift of supplies to Israel. This is only a partial example, however, since the United States only sent supplies, and did not intervene directly.
** In 1990, American ambassador April Glaspie met with then-ruler of Iraq Saddam Hussein to ask him about the troops he was massing on his border with Kuwait and the threats he was making toward Kuwait. He apparently assured her that he was just saber-rattling to win diplomatic concessions on a border dispute, and she seems to have understood him to say that he was committed to resolving the dispute peacefully. She famously assured him, however, that the U.S. has "no opinion on your Arab-Arab conflicts, such as your dispute with Kuwait....the Kuwait issue is not associated with America," and he may have taken that as a green light to invade Kuwait. Suffice it to say that when he did, the U.S. sent troops to the Persian Gulf, first to defend Saudi Arabia, but then to liberate Kuwait.

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** When the Cold War began, the Truman administration was quite indifferent to what happened in mainland east Asia, cutting off aid to Chiang Kai-shek and the KMT in the critical year of 1946, and then, after the Communists took over China, withdrawing American forces from Korea and declaring South Korea to be outside the American "defense perimeter in Asia." Asia". When the North Koreans then promptly invaded South Korea with Soviet and Chinese backing, the U.S. intervened on the South Korean side.
** When Lyndon Johnson became President, he declared that he was "not going to send American boys halfway around the world to do a job that Asian boys can and should do for themselves." themselves". When it became apparent in 1965 that South Vietnam was months if not weeks from falling to the Communists, however, ''and'' Communist forces fired on a U.S. naval vessel in the Gulf of Tonkin, he did exactly that.
** Contrary to popular belief, the U.S. was largely neutral in the Arab-Israeli conflict until the early 1970s, and did not, for example, intervene to open the Strait of Tiran in 1967 despite an earlier promise to do so. But when during the Yom Kippur War of 1973, when the Soviet Union sent a massive airlift of supplies to the Egyptians and the Syrians, the Nixon administration decided to send an American airlift of supplies to Israel. This is only a partial example, however, since the United States only sent supplies, and did not intervene directly.
** In 1990, American ambassador April Glaspie met with then-ruler of Iraq Saddam Hussein to ask him about the troops he was massing on his border with Kuwait and the threats he was making toward Kuwait. He apparently assured her that he was just saber-rattling to win diplomatic concessions on a border dispute, and she seems seemed to have understood him to say that he was committed to resolving the dispute peacefully. She famously assured him, however, that the U.S. has "no opinion on your Arab-Arab conflicts, such as your dispute with Kuwait....the Kuwait issue is not associated with America," America", and he may have taken that as a green light to invade Kuwait. Suffice it to say that when he did, the U.S. sent troops to the Persian Gulf, first to defend Saudi Arabia, but then to liberate Kuwait.



** Also during the 1990s, the United States was neutral in the civil war in Afghanistan between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance, even as the Taliban took over most of the country, pushing the Northern Alliance into a tiny strip of territory in the north. After September 11, 2001, however, the United States intervened in Afghanistan on the side of the Northern Alliance, and removed the Taliban from power; the "civil war"/insurgency continues to this day, however.
** Also happens ''within'' the United States - at the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Kentucky was a slave-holding state that identified culturally with the South but one that didn't have much appetite for secession (its governor Beriah Magoffin was Southern-sympathizing and bristled at President Lincoln's call for troops to serve in Union armies but believed slave states should remain in the Union and the Constitution). For the first several months it tried to stay neutral, its legislature refusing to vote on a bill of secession and instead passed a bill asking both side to leave them alone. Then Confederate General Leonidas Polk occupied the town of Columbus that summer, spurring the legislature (which at this point had become pro-Union enough to override the governor's vetoes) to start passing legislation blatantly against Confederate efforts but not the Union's - ''this'' in turn pissed off pro-Confederates in the western and central parts of the state, who [[StartMyOwn established their own state government]] that joined the Confederacy that December. Kentucky's stance was sorted out by 1862, with the state effectively in Union hands thanks to General Ulysses Grant, the original pro-Union government remaining in effective control, Governor Magoffin resigning, and the rival pro-Confederate government existing only on paper having been forced to flee to Tennessee.
* Italy in both World Wars. In UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, Italy was supposed to immediately enter the war on the side of Germany and Austria-Hungary, but refused due a loophole and stayed neutral for about a year before entering the war AGAINST them. In UsefulNotes/WorldWarII it happened TWICE: first Italy was supposed to join Germany as soon as France and Britain declared war, but stayed neutral until the war appeared to be already won and attacked France and a small British colony just for the show, only to get held off by the French and find out the hard way that the British Empire wouldn't surrender; in 1943 an invaded Italy sued for peace and became neutral again until the German reinforcements sent to help the defense were ordered to become an occupation force.
* Vichy France was a subversion during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. The government (including France's colonies) was neutral in the war (at least officially). In particular they were guaranteed control of the French Navy, which they promised to the Allies they would not allow to fall into German hands. Evidently lacking confidence in this promise (or the Vichies' ability to keep it), the Royal Navy seized several French ships and fired on the French fleet at Mers-el-Kébir. There were numerous skirmishes between Vichy French and Allied forces after this, and Vichy neutrality effectively ended with Case Anton, the German seizure and occupation of all of Vichy France. As it turns out, the French kept their promise regarding their Navy, scuttling their ships in the harbor at Toulon.
* To protest against [[CorruptCorporateExecutive SOPA and Protect IP]], Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} blacked out their website on January 18, 2012. Wikipedia is notable for staying as TrueNeutral as possible, making this a ''huge'' change in their policy. Ironically enough, they had to break their own neutrality in order to fight for the principle of neutrality.
* In the Napoleonic wars Denmark tried to be neutral so they could trade with both England and France, "unfortunately" they had a very big fleet at that time, making England scared that France would get to use the fleet. So they bombed it in 1807, an act that made Denmark join the war on France's side.
** {{UsefulNotes/Denmark}} was neutral in WWI and would probably had been that in WWII as well, if it hadn't been for Germany invading the country in 1940, making them technically no longer neutral.

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** Also during the 1990s, the United States was neutral in the civil war in Afghanistan between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance, even as the Taliban took over most of the country, pushing the Northern Alliance into a tiny strip of territory in the north. After September 11, 2001, however, the United States intervened in Afghanistan on the side of the Northern Alliance, and removed the Taliban from power; the power. The "civil war"/insurgency continues to this day, however.
** Also happens ''within'' the United States - at the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Kentucky was a slave-holding state that identified culturally with the South but one that didn't have much appetite for secession (its governor Beriah Magoffin was Southern-sympathizing and bristled at President Lincoln's call for troops to serve in Union armies but believed slave states should remain in the Union and the Constitution). For the first several months it tried to stay neutral, its legislature refusing to vote on a bill of secession and instead passed a bill asking both side to leave them alone. Then Then, Confederate General Leonidas Polk occupied the town of Columbus that summer, spurring the legislature (which at this point had become pro-Union enough to override the governor's vetoes) to start passing legislation blatantly against Confederate efforts but not the Union's - ''this'' in turn pissed off pro-Confederates in the western and central parts of the state, who [[StartMyOwn established their own state government]] that joined the Confederacy that December. Kentucky's stance was sorted out by 1862, with the state effectively in Union hands thanks to General Ulysses Grant, the original pro-Union government remaining in effective control, Governor Magoffin resigning, and the rival pro-Confederate government existing only on paper having been forced to flee to Tennessee.
* Italy in both World Wars. In UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, Italy was supposed to immediately enter the war on the side of Germany and Austria-Hungary, but refused due a loophole and stayed neutral for about a year before entering the war AGAINST ''against'' them. In UsefulNotes/WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, it happened TWICE: first TWICE. First, Italy was supposed to join Germany as soon as France and Britain declared war, but stayed neutral until the war appeared to be already won and attacked France and a small British colony just for the show, only to get held off by the French and find out the hard way that the British Empire wouldn't surrender; in 1943 surrender. In 1943, an invaded Italy sued for peace and became neutral again until the German reinforcements sent to help the defense were ordered to become an occupation force.
* Vichy France was a subversion during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. The government (including France's colonies) was neutral in the war (at least officially). In particular they were guaranteed control of the French Navy, which they promised to the Allies they would not allow to fall into German hands. Evidently lacking confidence in this promise (or the Vichies' ability ability/desire to keep it), the Royal Navy seized several French ships and fired on the French fleet at Mers-el-Kébir. There were numerous skirmishes between Vichy French and Allied forces after this, and Vichy neutrality effectively ended with Case Anton, the German seizure and occupation of all of Vichy France. As it turns out, the French kept their promise regarding their Navy, scuttling their ships in the harbor at Toulon.
* To protest against [[CorruptCorporateExecutive SOPA and Protect IP]], PIPA,]] Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} blacked out their website on January 18, 2012. Wikipedia is notable for staying as TrueNeutral as possible, making this a ''huge'' change in their policy. Ironically enough, they had to break their own neutrality in order to fight for the principle of neutrality.
* In the Napoleonic wars Wars, Denmark tried to be neutral so they could trade with both England and France, "unfortunately" they had a very big fleet at that time, making England scared that France would get to use the fleet. So they bombed it in 1807, an act that made Denmark join the war on France's side.
** {{UsefulNotes/Denmark}} was neutral in WWI and would have probably had been that so in WWII as well, if it hadn't been for Germany invading the country in 1940, making them technically no longer neutral.


* In the Napoleonic wars Denmark tried to be neutral so they could trade with both England and France, "unfortunately" they had a very big fleet at that time, making England scared that France would get to use the fleet. So they bombed it in 1807, ironically that made Denmark join the war on France's side.

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* In the Napoleonic wars Denmark tried to be neutral so they could trade with both England and France, "unfortunately" they had a very big fleet at that time, making England scared that France would get to use the fleet. So they bombed it in 1807, ironically an act that made Denmark join the war on France's side.

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* ''Literature/MagicMetahumansMartiansAndMushroomCloudsAnAlternateColdWar'': The ''Yuzhou de fangshi'' [[WarriorMonk monks]] at the Xuchan Shrine stay neutral for much of the Chinese Civil War, until the PLA accidentally bombs the shrine while driving out Kuomintang forces in the region. The survivors then flee to Nationalist territory and provide their services to Chiang Kai-shek.

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* ''Fanfic/JackieChanAdventuresOlympianJourney'': Upon the heroes and [[BigBad Eris]] coming across her in the ruins of Olympus, Hestia -- the NeutralFemale Greek Goddess of the Hearth -- decides that she's no longer going to sit on the sidelines. The next three chapters after her introduction involve [[HumanityOnTrial putting the good and bad guys on trial]] to see who Hestia will side with.


** Grand Moff Tarkin demonstrates the Death Star's ability to be a roving KillSat on the planet Alderaan in the hopes that other systems who want to join the Rebel Alliance would think twice. It backfired; not only did it hasten the defection of those who were already considering it, but a whole swath of otherwise neutral systems joined up because of it.

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** Played with Grand Moff Tarkin demonstrates the Death Star's ability to be a roving KillSat on the planet Alderaan in the hopes that other systems who want to join the Rebel Alliance would think twice. It backfired; not only did Leia states it hasten will backfire. In the defection first three movies, there is no apparent sign of those who were already considering it, this happening. It certainly does so in the expanded universe / Legends continuity, but a whole swath of otherwise neutral systems joined up because of it. we see no evidence in the films proper.


* Film/TheLordOfTheRings: The Ents. In the film version, they initially decide to remain neutral, and only change their minds when Tree beard comes across a [[BerserkButton field of felled trees]]. This trope does not apply as much to the book; the Ents hold Entmoot, and decide to attack Saruman. Either way, the outcome is an awesome CurbStompBattle.

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* Film/TheLordOfTheRings: The Ents. In the film version, they Ents in ''Film/TheLordOfTheRingsTheTwoTowers''. They initially decide to remain neutral, and only change their minds when Tree beard comes across a [[BerserkButton field of felled trees]]. This trope does not apply as much to the book; the Ents hold Entmoot, and decide to attack Saruman. Either way, the outcome is an awesome CurbStompBattle.

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* In the backstory of ''Literature/ShadowOfTheConqueror,'' the [[TheOrder Arch Order of Light]] remained neutral in all political conflicts, even as [[IndustrializedEvil the Dawn Empire]] crushed nation after nation. It was Emperor Dayless [[FantasticNuke destroying the city of Daybreak]] that finally persuaded them that the Dawn Empire was a threat to the entire world, prompting them to join the war and prove the decisive force in destroying it.


* In ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock, the series is resolved when Superman convinces Dr. Manhattan that beneath it all, the latter ''still'' has ties to his humanity. It inspires him to actually start caring about the multiverse, instead of being a curious, uncaring experimental scientist.

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* In ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock, ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'', the series is resolved when Superman convinces Dr. Manhattan that beneath it all, the latter ''still'' has ties to his humanity. It inspires him to actually start caring about the multiverse, instead of being a curious, uncaring experimental scientist.

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* In ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock, the series is resolved when Superman convinces Dr. Manhattan that beneath it all, the latter ''still'' has ties to his humanity. It inspires him to actually start caring about the multiverse, instead of being a curious, uncaring experimental scientist.

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* ''VideoGame/ThiefDeadlyShadows'': Garrett's RefusalOfTheCall finally ends when he becomes the leader of the Keepers; subverted in that the Keepers try to be neutral, even though ultimately they are forced to pick a side too.

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