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* ''Videogame/FateGrandOrder'': Explicitly mentioned by Da Vinci in the second part of the game, in regards to [[LayeredWorld jumping between the real world and the "Sea of Imaginary Numbers"]]. The "rate" of time between the two realms always fluctuates, although time would usually pass slower in the real world.





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%%Request %% Request made and permission granted in Ask The Tropers.







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* ''Film/StarTrekGenerations'':
** Picard, Kirk, and Guinan all meet inside the Nexus within hours after arriving, even though Kirk and Guinan entered (and Guinan left) decades before Picard got there. Picard and Kirk also both exit the Nexus shortly before Picard entered in "real" time. We're explicitly told time doesn't exist in the Nexus.
** Possibly averted in Guinan's case, as the Guinan Picard sees is described (by herself) as being some sort of remnant/echo of the Guinan that left.

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\n[[folder: Film ]]\n\n* ''Film/StarTrekGenerations'':\n** Picard, Kirk, and Guinan all meet inside the Nexus within hours after arriving, even though Kirk and Guinan entered (and Guinan left) decades before Picard got there. Picard and Kirk also both exit the Nexus shortly before Picard entered in "real" time. We're explicitly told time doesn't exist in the Nexus.\n** Possibly averted in Guinan's case, as the Guinan Picard sees is described (by herself) as being some sort of remnant/echo of the Guinan that left.[[folder:Film Animated]]



* In ''Film/{{Jumanji Welcome To The Jungle}}'', this is the best way to describe the time flow between the InUniverse titular video game and real life. Players get sucked into the game in the form of their avatars and once the game is finished they return back to the real world in their normal forms at the exact time from which they started playing.
* Likewise in ''Film/{{Hook}}''. Peter promises to visit Wendy every spring, but his visits clearly don't occur at regular intervals. This is averted in the book. While Neverland has no seasons, and sunrises and such come and go whenever they feel like it, the relative time for people inside and outside is the same, and the children really are gone for months. While Peter's 'springtime' visits don't come at regular intervals, it's because he doesn't know/care how much time is passing, not because it isn't.
* In ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', time behaves oddly on the planet Sakaar, but how this works is vague at best. Thor and Loki end up there after being thrown out of the Bifrost wormhole, but Loki arrives weeks ahead of Thor despite them only being seconds apart. The Grandmaster notes that the planet has allowed him to live [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld a very long time]], suggesting time either passes slower there or people just don't age...but all the scenes back on Asgard appear to happen concurrently with Thor's plotline.



[[folder: Literature ]]

* The Trope Namer is ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' series by C. S. Lewis. In most of the books, a number of people (usually children) travel between the "real" world and the fictional land of Narnia. Edmund is able to determine that the [[MagicAIsMagicA rule]] is: when you're in Narnia, no matter how long you stay there, no time passes in the "real" world; but when you're in the "real" world, any amount of time could be passing in Narnia.

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[[folder: Literature ]]

[[folder:Film Live-Action]]
* Likewise in ''Film/{{Hook}}''. Peter promises to visit Wendy every spring, but his visits clearly don't occur at regular intervals. This is averted in the book. While Neverland has no seasons, and sunrises and such come and go whenever they feel like it, the relative time for people inside and outside is the same, and the children really are gone for months. While Peter's 'springtime' visits don't come at regular intervals, it's because he doesn't know/care how much time is passing, not because it isn't.
* In ''Film/JumanjiWelcomeToTheJungle'', this is the best way to describe the time flow between the InUniverse titular video game and real life. Players get sucked into the game in the form of their avatars and once the game is finished they return back to the real world in their normal forms at the exact time from which they started playing.
* ''Film/StarTrekGenerations'':
** Picard, Kirk, and Guinan all meet inside the Nexus within hours after arriving, even though Kirk and Guinan entered (and Guinan left) decades before Picard got there. Picard and Kirk also both exit the Nexus shortly before Picard entered in "real" time. We're explicitly told time doesn't exist in the Nexus.
** Possibly averted in Guinan's case, as the Guinan Picard sees is described (by herself) as being some sort of remnant/echo of the Guinan that left.
* In ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', time behaves oddly on the planet Sakaar, but how this works is vague at best. Thor and Loki end up there after being thrown out of the Bifrost wormhole, but Loki arrives weeks ahead of Thor despite them only being seconds apart. The Grandmaster notes that the planet has allowed him to live [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld a very long time]], suggesting time either passes slower there or people just don't age... but all the scenes back on Asgard appear to happen concurrently with Thor's plotline.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Folklore]]
* In western folklore, fairy rings are often understood to operate like this. Step in one, and you could experience days, weeks, or months in the fairies' world while only having been gone from your own world for a short moment. Or, you could end up passing what seems like a few short hours with the fairies but return to your home and discover decades or centuries actually passed. Fairy magic is notoriously fickle.
* In Japanese folklore, there is a tale about Urashima Taro who, after rescuing a turtle who was a princess in disguise, he is taken by said princess to her castle, where they spend supposedly three years together there. When Urashima asks the princess to let him go back to the surface to see his friends and family again, she gives him a box that must never be opened. When the young fisherman tries to see his family, he is told that they died ''400'' years ago, which devastates him emotionally. [[DespairEventHorizon Utterly hopeless]], he opens the aforementioned box--which immediately makes him 400 years older--and dies instantly. It happens that the box was retaining his ''true age at that moment''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* In ''Literature/TheBeyonders'' the relative rates of time between Earth and Lyrian are inconsistent. When Jason returns to Earth at the end of the first book he finds that a few more months have passed at home, and later an Oracle explains that it's hard to predict what time dimensional travelers will come out in, but thanks to her powers she knows that in five years the timelines will be synced. [[spoiler: Rachel takes that opportunity to go back, knowing that her parents won't have seen her for five years and vice-versa. And a prophecy indicates that she'll later go on another adventure with Jason's (who stayed) daughter.]]
* This is how Madam Aisha's "Fairy Corridor" Authority works in ''{{LightNovel/Campione}}''. It opens a portal that sends her to some random place and time in the past where she can spend years to return only a few days or hours after she left, or spend only a handful of days and come back years after she left and everything in between. While she has no control over being sent into the past, she has some limited control over how long between when she left and arrives back in the "present" and deliberately legnthens the time to make her younger than her chronological age would suggest ([[TheDitz despite being an immortal god slayer]]).
* In Creator/RogerZelazny's ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfAmber'' series, the characters are not only aware of this effect when traveling through [[TheMultiverse Shadow]], but actually take advantage of it to heal up, recruit armies and train them in record time, and so forth. It is inconsistent between Amber and Chaos: Corwin fathers a child, who grows to adulthood in Chaos, in what to Corwin is days. On the other hand, when Corwin visits Chaos for a few minutes, weeks pass back in Amber. Chaos is...chaotic.
** The relative rate at which time passes varies from Shadow to Shadow. Depending on where you go, time in Amber might either be passing more quickly or more slowly than it is for you, though unlike Chaos it's mostly consistent for any given Shadow (if "any given Shadow" is a meaningful term).
* The Trope Namer TropeNamer is ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' series by C. S. Lewis.Creator/CSLewis. In most of the books, a number of people (usually children) travel between the "real" world and the fictional land of Narnia. Edmund is able to determine that the [[MagicAIsMagicA rule]] is: when you're in Narnia, no matter how long you stay there, no time passes in the "real" world; but when you're in the "real" world, any amount of time could be passing in Narnia.



* In Mikhail Uspensky's ''Dear Comrade King'', the temporal relation between our world and [[FlatWorld Zamirye]] works like that. But wait, there's more! Turns out that a local wizard cast a TimeyWimeyBall spell, so the speed of time flow in various parts of Zamirye also goes out of sync. So two characters from Earth enter Zamirye in the height of the Soviet rule, spend there some months and return after TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, right in the middle of the First Abkhazian Conflict.
* In ''Literature/TheDemonata'', time passes differently in each Demon Universe so characters from different times can interact and end up similiar ages. Also leads to odd events such as Kernel returning to his parents after being missing for a number of years but he hasnt aged at all.
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': In ''Discworld/SmallGods'', when Brutha [[spoiler: dies, and finds Vorbis, who died a century ago, still hasn't crossed the desert]]:
-->'''Brutha''': He's been here for a hundred years?\\
'''Death''': Perhaps not. Time is different here. It is ... more personal.\\
'''Brutha''': Ah, you mean a hundred years can seem like a few seconds?\\
'''Death''': A hundred years can pass like infinity.
* This is how travel to the Nevernever works in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''. Time generally runs faster in the Nevernever than on Earth, but it varies from one part of the Nevernever to another and sufficiently powerful faeries can deliberately influence the speed. Most of the time this detail doesn't matter to Harry and the time skip is never enough to add up to months or years. However, when his police officer friend is supposed to be working on a high-profile case, just a few hours in the Nevernever can add up to a length of time that's hard to explain to her superiors.
* In K.A. Applegate's ''Literature/{{Everworld}}'', the main characters effectively live double lives, going between the Old World and Everworld whenever they fall asleep. The time between the two worlds/universes seems to vary each time, but usually not by more than a factor of a few days. [[spoiler:This breaks down in the final book.]]
* The ''Pet Force'' series of ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' books. The flow of time between the two universes (Garfield's regular universe and the Pet Force universe) is proportional (so time will pass in the mainstream universe but considerably more will pass in the alternate universe). This is usually a non-issue as Garfield and his friends return to their correct universe within the span of approximately five seconds but during the epilogue of one book, they are unable to return to their origin universe and Jon notices their absence.



* In ''Kindred'', a strange example where time passes differently in different time periods.
* In ''Literature/TheMagicians'', travel between Fillory and Earth works the same way, which of course makes sense, since Fillory is [[{{Expy}} essentially a parody of Narnia.]]
* In ''Literature/ThePendragonAdventure'' it's said on multiple occasions that "Travelers arrive where they're needed when they're needed" (or words to that effect); so time spent in one territory doesn't necessarily correspond in any meaningful way with time in another territory. [[spoiler:Becomes a little strange when three of the territories are just different time periods in other territories. Not to mention how it's apparently okay to change things in one of those redundant territories, [[FridgeLogic until it actually matters at the end of the series]].]]
* In Eloise [=McGraw's=] ''Literature/TheMoorchild'', "time runs different in the Mound", the Mound being the home of the Folk. A human who's lured in can stay for what feels like a season or at most a year, and then when kicked out discover that a few decades have passed and he has aged accordingly.
* In K.A. Applegate's ''Literature/{{Everworld}}'', the main characters effectively live double lives, going between the Old World and Everworld whenever they fall asleep. The time between the two worlds/universes seems to vary each time, but usually not by more than a factor of a few days.
** [[spoiler: This breaks down in the final book.]]

to:

* In ''Kindred'', a strange example where ''Literature/{{Hours}}'', one hour of regular time passes differently in different time periods.
* In ''Literature/TheMagicians'', travel between Fillory and Earth works the same way, which of course makes sense, since Fillory is [[{{Expy}} essentially a parody of Narnia.]]
* In ''Literature/ThePendragonAdventure'' it's said on multiple occasions that "Travelers arrive where they're needed when they're needed" (or words to that effect); so time spent in one territory doesn't necessarily correspond in
can equal any meaningful way with amount of time in another territory. [[spoiler:Becomes a little strange when three of the territories are just different Waving World, from tens of minutes up to many days. This is because the perception of time periods in other territories. Not to mention how it's apparently okay to change things in one of those redundant territories, [[FridgeLogic until it actually matters at the end of the series]].]]
* In Eloise [=McGraw's=] ''Literature/TheMoorchild'', "time runs different
in the Mound", the Mound being the home of the Folk. A human who's lured in can stay for what feels like a season or at most a year, and then when kicked out discover that a few decades have passed and he has aged accordingly.
* In K.A. Applegate's ''Literature/{{Everworld}}'', the main characters effectively live double lives, going between the Old
Waving World and Everworld whenever they fall asleep. The is based on events, not physics. Happenings of great import, such people dying, take up more real time between the two worlds/universes seems to vary each time, but usually not by more than a factor of a few days.
** [[spoiler: This breaks down in the final book.]]
do mundane tasks.



* This is how travel to the Nevernever works in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''. Time generally runs faster in the Nevernever than on Earth, but it varies from one part of the Nevernever to another and sufficiently powerful faeries can deliberately influence the speed. Most of the time this detail doesn't matter to Harry and the time skip is never enough to add up to months or years. However, when his police officer friend is supposed to be working on a high-profile case, just a few hours in the Nevernever can add up to a length of time that's hard to explain to her superiors.

to:

%%* In ''Kindred'', a strange example where time passes differently in different time periods.
* This is how In ''Literature/TheMagicians'', travel to the Nevernever between Fillory and Earth works in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''. Time generally the same way, which of course makes sense, since Fillory is [[{{Expy}} essentially a parody of Narnia]].
* In Eloise [=McGraw's=] ''Literature/TheMoorchild'', "time
runs faster different in the Nevernever than on Earth, but it varies from one part Mound", the Mound being the home of the Nevernever to another Folk. A human who's lured in can stay for what feels like a season or at most a year, and sufficiently powerful faeries can deliberately influence the speed. Most of the then when kicked out discover that a few decades have passed and he has aged accordingly.
* In ''Literature/ThePendragonAdventure'' it's said on multiple occasions that "Travelers arrive where they're needed when they're needed" (or words to that effect); so
time this detail spent in one territory doesn't matter to Harry and the necessarily correspond in any meaningful way with time skip is never enough to add up to months or years. However, in another territory. [[spoiler:Becomes a little strange when his police officer friend is supposed to be working on a high-profile case, three of the territories are just a few hours in the Nevernever can add up to a length of different time that's hard periods in other territories. Not to explain mention how it's apparently okay to her superiors.change things in one of those redundant territories, [[FridgeLogic until it actually matters at the end of the series]].]]



** This is played [[TearJerker to its heartbreaking conclusion when]] [[spoiler: Lucien's entrapment in Bellezza for like, two days, translates into a three-week coma in England - coinciding with a resurgence of his brain cancer. His parents, having concluded he's never waking up, decide to cut off his life support.]]
* In ''Discworld/SmallGods'', when Brutha [[spoiler: dies, and finds Vorbis, who died a century ago, still hasn't crossed the desert]]:
-->'''Brutha''': He's been here for a hundred years?
-->'''Death''': Perhaps not. Time is different here. It is ... more personal.
-->'''Brutha''': Ah, you mean a hundred years can seem like a few seconds?
-->'''Death''':A hundred years can pass like infinity.
* The ''Pet Force'' series of ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' books. The flow of time between the two universes (Garfield's regular universe and the Pet Force universe) is proportional (so time will pass in the mainstream universe but considerably more will pass in the alternate universe). This is usually a non-issue as Garfield and his friends return to their correct universe within the span of approximately five seconds but during the epilogue of one book, they are unable to return to their origin universe and Jon notices their absence.
* In Creator/RogerZelazny's ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfAmber'' series, the characters are not only aware of this effect when traveling through [[TheMultiverse Shadow]], but actually take advantage of it to heal up, recruit armies and train them in record time, and so forth. It is inconsistent between Amber and Chaos: Corwin fathers a child, who grows to adulthood in Chaos, in what to Corwin is days. On the other hand, when Corwin visits Chaos for a few minutes, weeks pass back in Amber. Chaos is...chaotic.
** The relative rate at which time passes varies from Shadow to Shadow. Depending on where you go, time in Amber might either be passing more quickly or more slowly than it is for you, though unlike Chaos it's mostly consistent for any given Shadow (if "any given Shadow" is a meaningful term).
* In Japanese folklore, there is a tale about Urashima Taro who, after rescuing a turtle who was a princess in disguise, he is taken by said princess to her castle, where they spend supposedly three years together there. When Urashima asks the princess to let him go back to the surface to see his friends and family again, she gives him a box that must never be opened. When the young fisherman tries to see his family, he is told that they died ''400'' years ago, which devastates him emotionally. [[DespairEventHorizon Utterly hopeless]], he opens the aforementioned box--which immediately makes him 400 years older--and dies instantly. It happens that the box was retaining his ''true age at that moment''.
* In ''Literature/TheDemonata'', time passes differently in each Demon Universe so characters from different times can interact and end up similiar ages. Also leads to odd events such as Kernel returning to his parents after being missing for a number of years but he hasnt aged at all.
* In ''Literature/{{Hours}}'', one hour of regular time can equal any amount of time in the Waving World, from tens of minutes up to many days. This is because the perception of time in the Waving World is based on events, not physics. Happenings of great import, such people dying, take up more real time than do mundane tasks.

to:

** This is played [[TearJerker to its heartbreaking conclusion when]] [[spoiler: Lucien's [[spoiler:Lucien's entrapment in Bellezza for like, two days, translates into a three-week coma in England - coinciding with a resurgence of his brain cancer. His parents, having concluded he's never waking up, decide to cut off his life support.]]
* In ''Discworld/SmallGods'', when Brutha [[spoiler: dies, and finds Vorbis, who died a century ago, still hasn't crossed the desert]]:
-->'''Brutha''': He's been here for a hundred years?
-->'''Death''': Perhaps not. Time is different here. It is ... more personal.
-->'''Brutha''': Ah, you mean a hundred years can seem like a few seconds?
-->'''Death''':A hundred years can pass like infinity.
* The ''Pet Force'' series of ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' books. The flow of time between the two universes (Garfield's regular universe and the Pet Force universe) is proportional (so time will pass in the mainstream universe but considerably more will pass in the alternate universe). This is usually a non-issue as Garfield and his friends return to their correct universe within the span of approximately five seconds but during the epilogue of one book, they are unable to return to their origin universe and Jon notices their absence.
* In Creator/RogerZelazny's ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfAmber'' series, the characters are not only aware of this effect when traveling through [[TheMultiverse Shadow]], but actually take advantage of it to heal up, recruit armies and train them in record time, and so forth. It is inconsistent between Amber and Chaos: Corwin fathers a child, who grows to adulthood in Chaos, in what to Corwin is days. On the other hand, when Corwin visits Chaos for a few minutes, weeks pass back in Amber. Chaos is...chaotic.
** The relative rate at which time passes varies from Shadow to Shadow. Depending on where you go, time in Amber might either be passing more quickly or more slowly than it is for you, though unlike Chaos it's mostly consistent for any given Shadow (if "any given Shadow" is a meaningful term).
* In Japanese folklore, there is a tale about Urashima Taro who, after rescuing a turtle who was a princess in disguise, he is taken by said princess to her castle, where they spend supposedly three years together there. When Urashima asks the princess to let him go back to the surface to see his friends and family again, she gives him a box that must never be opened. When the young fisherman tries to see his family, he is told that they died ''400'' years ago, which devastates him emotionally. [[DespairEventHorizon Utterly hopeless]], he opens the aforementioned box--which immediately makes him 400 years older--and dies instantly. It happens that the box was retaining his ''true age at that moment''.
* In ''Literature/TheDemonata'', time passes differently in each Demon Universe so characters from different times can interact and end up similiar ages. Also leads to odd events such as Kernel returning to his parents after being missing for a number of years but he hasnt aged at all.
* In ''Literature/{{Hours}}'', one hour of regular time can equal any amount of time in the Waving World, from tens of minutes up to many days. This is because the perception of time in the Waving World is based on events, not physics. Happenings of great import, such people dying, take up more real time than do mundane tasks.
]]



* In Mikhail Uspensky's ''Dear Comrade King'', the temporal relation between our world and [[FlatWorld Zamirye]] works like that. But wait, there's more! Turns out that a local wizard cast a TimeyWimeyBall spell, so the speed of time flow in various parts of Zamirye also goes out of sync. So two characters from Earth enter Zamirye in the height of the Soviet rule, spend there some months and return after TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, right in the middle of the First Abkhazian Conflict.
* In ''Literature/TheBeyonders'' the relative rates of time between Earth and Lyrian are inconsistent. When Jason returns to Earth at the end of the first book he finds that a few more months have passed at home, and later an Oracle explains that it's hard to predict what time dimensional travelers will come out in, but thanks to her powers she knows that in five years the timelines will be synced. [[spoiler: Rachel takes that opportunity to go back, knowing that her parents won't have seen her for five years and vice-versa. And a prophecy indicates that she'll later go on another adventure with Jason's (who stayed) daughter.]]
* This is how Madam Aisha's "Fairy Corridor" Authority works in ''{{LightNovel/Campione}}''. It opens a portal that sends her to some random place and time in the past where she can spend years to return only a few days or hours after she left, or spend only a handful of days and come back years after she left and everything in between. While she has no control over being sent into the past, she has some limited control over how long between when she left and arrives back in the "present" and deliberately legnthens the time to make her younger than her chronological age would suggest ([[TheDitz despite being an immortal god slayer]]).



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* Inverted in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E12BlinkOfAnEye Blink of an Eye]]"; a planet's time passes 58 times faster than time on Voyager, advancing their civilization from Stone Knives and Bearskins to an advanced space-faring society in a matter of days. One inhabitant of the planet survived his time on Voyager, but returned over a century later planet-time to find all his acquaintances long dead of old age,

to:

* Inverted in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E12BlinkOfAnEye Blink of an Eye]]"; a planet's time passes 58 times faster than time on Voyager, advancing their civilization from Stone Knives and Bearskins to an advanced space-faring society in a matter of days. One inhabitant of the planet survived his time on Voyager, but returned over a century later planet-time to find all his acquaintances long dead of old age,
age.





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[[folder: Folklore]]

* In western folklore, fairy rings are often understood to operate like this. Step in one, and you could experience days, weeks, or months in the fairies' world while only having been gone from your own world for a short moment. Or, you could end up passing what seems like a few short hours with the fairies but return to your home and discover decades or centuries actually passed. Fairy magic is notoriously fickle.

to:

[[folder: Folklore]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In western folklore, fairy rings ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'', portals between the Ghost Zone and the real world occur naturally, opening and closing at random, and are capable of leading to anywhere or any''when''. The only exceptions are the two artificial portals, which are generated and held open through technological means.
* The Neitherworld, where WesternAnimation/{{Beetlejuice}} spends his days, appears to run on a very different timetable than the Outerworld. Lydia is
often understood with Beetlejuice for hours or even ''days'', and yet she's never shown to operate miss any school or have her absence noticed by anyone.
* Although there is no time or interdimensional travel in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', Narnia Time is repeatedly played for laughs as part of a recurring gag. It goes
like this. Step in one, this: Bojack becomes depressed and you could experience days, weeks, goes on an alcoholic or months in the fairies' world while drug fuelled bender, then he'll start a conversation or say he's about to perform a simple task which would only having been gone from your own world for take a short moment. Or, you could end up passing what seems like a few short hours with time to perform, and the fairies but return background will change to your home show the task or conversation has been completed. And then his companion will look at him strangely, explain that a much longer period of time has passed, and discover decades either briefly summarize his drug-fuelled antics or centuries actually passed. Fairy magic is notoriously fickle.
tell him that he's been missing for weeks or months.





[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* In ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'', portals between the Ghost Zone and the real world occur naturally, opening and closing at random, and are capable of leading to anywhere or any''when''. The only exceptions are the two artificial portals, which are generated and held open through technological means.
* The Neitherworld, where WesternAnimation/{{Beetlejuice}} spends his days, appears to run on a very different timetable than the Outerworld. Lydia is often with Beetlejuice for hours or even ''days'', and yet she's never shown to miss any school or have her absence noticed by anyone.
* Although there is no time or interdimensional travel in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', Narnia Time is repeatedly played for laughs as part of a recurring gag. It goes like this: Bojack becomes depressed and goes on an alcoholic or drug fuelled bender, then he'll start a conversation or say he's about to perform a simple task which would only take a short time to perform, and the background will change to show the task or conversation has been completed. And then his companion will look at him strangely, explain that a much longer period of time has passed, and either briefly summarize his drug-fuelled antics or tell him that he's been missing for weeks or months.
[[/folder]]



to:

* Inverted in the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS6E12BlinkOfAnEye Blink of an Eye]]"; a planet's time passes 58 times faster than time on Voyager, advancing their civilization from Stone Knives and Bearskins to an advanced space-faring society in a matter of days. One inhabitant of the planet survived his time on Voyager, but returned over a century later planet-time to find all his acquaintances long dead of old age,




to:

\n*In Negima! Magister Negi Magi, Evangeline A.K. Mc Dowell uses miniaturized worlds contained within glass diorama spheres as alternate places to train or relax, such as the Resort. One hour in the real world equals 24 in the resort. Due to a spell cast by Evangeline, occupants must stay for a full day (one hour in the real world) before being able to leave. This device is the subject of an important plot twist during the Mahora festival arc.


Added DiffLines:

** Tirian is also astonished to find out that Digory and Polly were still alive in our world at the time of ''The Last Battle'', since they were present at the moment of Narnia's ''creation''.


* In ''Literature/TheMagicians'', travel between Fillory and Earth works the same way, which of course makes sense, since Fillory is [[{{Expy}} just Narnia by a different name.]]

to:

* In ''Literature/TheMagicians'', travel between Fillory and Earth works the same way, which of course makes sense, since Fillory is [[{{Expy}} just Narnia by essentially a different name.parody of Narnia.]]


* Although there is no time or interdimensional travel in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', Narnia Time is repeatedly played for laughs as part of a recurring gag. It goes like this : Bojack becomes depressed and goes on an alcoholic or drug fuelled bender, then he'll start a conversation or say he's about to perform a simple task which would only take a short time to perform, and the background will change to show the task or conversation has been completed. And then his companion will look at him strangely, explain that a much longer period of time has passed, and either briefly summarize his drug-fuelled antics or tell him that he's been missing for weeks or months.

to:

* Although there is no time or interdimensional travel in ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'', Narnia Time is repeatedly played for laughs as part of a recurring gag. It goes like this : this: Bojack becomes depressed and goes on an alcoholic or drug fuelled bender, then he'll start a conversation or say he's about to perform a simple task which would only take a short time to perform, and the background will change to show the task or conversation has been completed. And then his companion will look at him strangely, explain that a much longer period of time has passed, and either briefly summarize his drug-fuelled antics or tell him that he's been missing for weeks or months.


* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' example: As if [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace The Warp]] wasn't bad enough, there have been stories of heroes being imprisoned in [[PlanetHeck places the Warp bleeds through into reality]], and finding that they'd been missing for hundreds of years when they escape. On the other side of things, ships that come to the aid of distress signals occasionally find themselves under attack and sending the signal they'd followed in the first place. One Ork Warboss, looking to dual-wield his unique weapon, managed to ambush and assassinate ''his past self'' this way (the Waaagh! collapsed in the general confusion). Even on an an uneventful trip through the warp, timekeeping relative to the materium is a pain in the neck.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' example: As if [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace The Warp]] wasn't bad enough, there have been stories of heroes being imprisoned in [[PlanetHeck places the Warp bleeds through into reality]], and finding that they'd been missing for hundreds of years when they escape. On the other side of things, ships that come to the aid of distress signals occasionally find themselves under attack and sending the signal they'd followed in the first place. One Ork Warboss, looking to dual-wield his unique weapon, managed to ambush and assassinate ''his past self'' this way (the Waaagh! collapsed in the general confusion). Even on an an uneventful trip through the warp, timekeeping relative to the materium is a pain in the neck.
neck. Because all communication also uses the warp, the further a planet is from Terra the less certain they are of the actual date; the calendar the setting uses actually accounts for this.


* ''Film/{{Teen Beach Movie}}'': Mack and Brady end up trapped in a 1960s movie ''Wet Side Story'' and stay there throughout the entire story which lasted 3 days. When they return to the real world at the end of the film, they arrive at the exact same moment from which they left and not a second to spare.



* ''Literature/GuardiansOfTheFlame'': The students spent months on The Other Side, and return shortly after they left.

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* ''Literature/GuardiansOfTheFlame'': The students spent months on The Other Side, and return shortly after they left.



* ''Series/{{The Suite Life of Zack and Cody}}'': In the episode "Suite Life of Success", Zack and Cody travel to a {{Mirror Universe}} through one of Arwin's inventions and choose to stay there finding their lives better. However, when they realize that living there wasn't as great as it seemed at first and return to their own dimension at the end of the episode, they find out that they were only gone for a few minutes.


* ''Film/{{Teen Beach Movie}}'': Mack and Brady end up trapped in a 1960's movie ''Wet Side Story'' and stay there throughout the entire story which lasted 3 days. When they return to the real world at the end of the film, they arrive at the exact same moment from which they left and not a second to spare.

to:

* ''Film/{{Teen Beach Movie}}'': Mack and Brady end up trapped in a 1960's 1960s movie ''Wet Side Story'' and stay there throughout the entire story which lasted 3 days. When they return to the real world at the end of the film, they arrive at the exact same moment from which they left and not a second to spare.


* In ''Film/{{Jumanji Welcome To The Jungle}}'', this is the best way to describe the time flow between the InUniverse titular video game and real life. Players get ducked into the game in the form of their avatars and once the game is finished they return back to the real world in their normal at the exact time from which they started playing.

to:

* In ''Film/{{Jumanji Welcome To The Jungle}}'', this is the best way to describe the time flow between the InUniverse titular video game and real life. Players get ducked sucked into the game in the form of their avatars and once the game is finished they return back to the real world in their normal forms at the exact time from which they started playing.

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/{{Jumanji Welcome To The Jungle}}'', this is the best way to describe the time flow between the InUniverse titular video game and real life. Players get ducked into the game in the form of their avatars and once the game is finished they return back to the real world in their normal at the exact time from which they started playing.


* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' example: As if [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace The Warp]] wasn't bad enough, there have been stories of heroes being imprisoned in [[PlanetHeck places the Warp bleeds through into reality]], and finding that they'd been missing for hundreds of years when they escape. On the other side of things, ships that come to the aid of distress signals occasionally find themselves under attack and sending the signal they'd followed in the first place. One Ork Warboss managed to ambush and assassinate ''his past self'' this way (the Waaagh! collapsed in the general confusion). Even on an an uneventful trip through the warp, timekeeping relative to the materium is a pain in the neck.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' example: As if [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace The Warp]] wasn't bad enough, there have been stories of heroes being imprisoned in [[PlanetHeck places the Warp bleeds through into reality]], and finding that they'd been missing for hundreds of years when they escape. On the other side of things, ships that come to the aid of distress signals occasionally find themselves under attack and sending the signal they'd followed in the first place. One Ork Warboss Warboss, looking to dual-wield his unique weapon, managed to ambush and assassinate ''his past self'' this way (the Waaagh! collapsed in the general confusion). Even on an an uneventful trip through the warp, timekeeping relative to the materium is a pain in the neck.

Added DiffLines:

** The relative rate at which time passes varies from Shadow to Shadow. Depending on where you go, time in Amber might either be passing more quickly or more slowly than it is for you, though unlike Chaos it's mostly consistent for any given Shadow (if "any given Shadow" is a meaningful term).


* In ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', time behaves oddly on the planet Sakaar, but how this works is vague at best. Thor and Loki end up there after being thrown out of the Bifrost wormhole, but Loki arrives weeks ahead of Thor despite them only being seconds apart. The Grandmaster notes that the planet has allowed him to live [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld a very long time]], suggesting time either passes slower there or people just don't age...but all the scenes back on Asgard appear to happen concurrently with Thor's plot

to:

* In ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', time behaves oddly on the planet Sakaar, but how this works is vague at best. Thor and Loki end up there after being thrown out of the Bifrost wormhole, but Loki arrives weeks ahead of Thor despite them only being seconds apart. The Grandmaster notes that the planet has allowed him to live [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld a very long time]], suggesting time either passes slower there or people just don't age...but all the scenes back on Asgard appear to happen concurrently with Thor's plot
plotline.

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