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The end result is that people can get ''really'' angry when playing a MOBA. Their communities are infamously toxic; they [[SuffersNewbiesPoorly Suffer Newbies Poorly]] and blast [[IneffectualLoner weak team players]]. Many of these games have devoted communities to which the game in question is very much SeriousBusiness, and due to the inherent difficulties in measuring the contribution of individual players on teams, matchmaking between individual players for pick-up games tends to lead to much more varied skill levels of players on a given team than for games with more individually-tailored rating systems, especially in games with five or more players on a side. This, plus the basics of human psychology, results in a recipe for {{GIFT}} and {{Griefing}}, and all of the DOTA clones, due to the relatively long matches and teamwork-centric game design, suffer from this to a great extent.\\

to:

The end result is that people can get ''really'' angry when playing a MOBA. Their communities are infamously toxic; they [[SuffersNewbiesPoorly Suffer Newbies Poorly]] and blast [[IneffectualLoner weak team players]]. Many of these games have devoted communities to which the game in question is very much who treat play as SeriousBusiness, and due to the inherent difficulties in measuring the contribution of individual players on teams, matchmaking between individual players for pick-up games tends to lead to much more varied skill levels of players on a given team than for games with more individually-tailored rating systems, especially in games with five or more players on a side. This, plus the basics of human psychology, results in a recipe for {{GIFT}} and {{Griefing}}, and all of the DOTA clones, due to the relatively long matches and teamwork-centric game design, suffer from this to a great extent.\\



** The biggest ComebackMechanic, though, is the way respawn timers scale with level. The longer you've been playing the match, the longer it takes for slain heroes to respawn. This can create very long periods of time in which your team is under-strength in comparison to the enemy team. In fact, teams who have been winning the entire game have been known to lose the match by engaging in a team fight, losing said team fight by any margin whatsoever, and being unable to stop the enemy team as they steamroll their way through the gap.

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** The biggest ComebackMechanic, though, is the way respawn timers scale with level. The longer you've been playing the match, higher your character's level, the longer it takes for slain heroes that character to respawn. This can create very long periods of time in which your team is under-strength in comparison to the enemy team. In fact, teams who have been winning the entire game have been known to lose the match by engaging in a team fight, losing said team fight by any margin whatsoever, and being unable to stop the enemy team as they steamroll their way through the gap. (Of course, this requires your team to grab the IdiotBall with both hands ''and'' the enemy team to grab the SmartBall, neither of which are things you can count on.)



* ThrowingTheFight: often described as "feeding," this is the act of playing to lose, often by dying on purpose to the enemy team and "feeding" them the Gold and EXP bonuses. Note that this can happen without treacherous intent, if the other player is just that much better than you. Doesn't stop you from losing, though. And, if a teammate sees you doing this on accident, they may start doing it on purpose, just to get things over with faster.



* UnstableEquilibrium: [=MOBAs=] tend to have ''incredibly'' unstable equilibria. Remember that whole thing about "feeding"? If you die to the same enemy player three times or even ''twice'', you can basically condemn your team to defeat. There is ''very'' little margin for error in a [=MOBA=].



* YouAreFat: Inverted. In this genre, "fat" is almost always a compliment: someone who dies repeatedly is said to be [[ThrowingTheFight "feeding" the enemy]] as this grants said enemy large amounts of resources, so calling someone fat means that they were, well, fed, and are now overpowered as a result. This only applies to carries, though. If it's a support who somehow gets fat, they'll probably be criticized for being fat instead of stepping back and letting the ''carry'' become fat, which is what a support is supposed to do. (Keep in mind that carry characters are typically saddled with MagikarpPower levels of scaling, so being undernourished makes it impossible for them to [[TitleDrop carry]] the team to victory as they should.) (This is also an example of why the genre SuffersNewbiesPoorly: if you're a healer, being a HypercompetentSidekick is good way to ''lose''.)

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* YouAreFat: Inverted. In this genre, "fat" is almost always a compliment: it means someone who dies repeatedly is said to be [[ThrowingTheFight has been "feeding" the enemy]] as this grants said enemy large amounts of resources, so calling someone fat means that they were, well, fed, you and are now overpowered as a result. This only applies to carries, though. If it's a support who somehow gets fat, they'll probably be criticized for being fat instead of stepping back and letting the ''carry'' become fat, which is what a support is supposed to do. (Keep in mind that carry characters are typically saddled with MagikarpPower levels of scaling, so being undernourished makes it impossible for them to [[TitleDrop carry]] the team to victory as they should.) (This is also an example of why the genre SuffersNewbiesPoorly: if you're a healer, being a HypercompetentSidekick is good way to ''lose''.)


* DeathIsCheap: Downplayed. As mentioned, your hero respawns endlessly and will continue to do so for as long as the match goes on; you never have to worry about getting locked out of the match. Having said that, dying is literally the absolute worst thing you can ever do in a match (short of [[TheMole dying on purpose to hand the game to the enemy]]), because your team is 20% weaker until you come back. (And that's before we get into funky math about how much further the enemy team got ahead while you were gone.) While it is extremely difficult to play a serious match without ever dying, that is nonetheless the standard you are expected to play to.

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* DeathIsCheap: Downplayed. As mentioned, your hero respawns endlessly and will continue to do so for as long as the match goes on; you never have to worry about getting locked out of the match. Having said that, dying is literally the absolute worst thing you can ever do in a match (short of [[TheMole ThrowingTheFight by dying on purpose to hand the game to the enemy]]), purpose), because your team is 20% weaker until you come back. (And that's before we get into funky math about how much further the enemy team got ahead while you were gone.) While it is extremely difficult to play a serious match without ever dying, that is nonetheless the standard you are expected to play to. (Again, SuffersNewbiesPoorly.)



* YouAreFat: Inverted. In this genre, "fat" is almost always a compliment: someone who dies repeatedly is said to be "feeding" the enemy as this grants them large amounts of resources, so calling someone fat means that they were on the receiving end of this feeding and are now an extremely dangerous threat. This only applies to carries, though. If it's a support who somehow gets fat, they'll probably be criticized for being fat instead of stepping back and letting the ''carry'' become fat, which is what a support is supposed to do. (Keep in mind that carry characters are typically saddled with MagikarpPower levels of scaling, so being undernourished makes it impossible for them to [[TitleDrop carry]] the team to victory as they should. This is also an example of why the genre SuffersNewbiesPoorly: if you're a healer, you can actually screw over your team by ''being too good''.)

to:

* YouAreFat: Inverted. In this genre, "fat" is almost always a compliment: someone who dies repeatedly is said to be [[ThrowingTheFight "feeding" the enemy enemy]] as this grants them said enemy large amounts of resources, so calling someone fat means that they were on the receiving end of this feeding were, well, fed, and are now an extremely dangerous threat.overpowered as a result. This only applies to carries, though. If it's a support who somehow gets fat, they'll probably be criticized for being fat instead of stepping back and letting the ''carry'' become fat, which is what a support is supposed to do. (Keep in mind that carry characters are typically saddled with MagikarpPower levels of scaling, so being undernourished makes it impossible for them to [[TitleDrop carry]] the team to victory as they should. This ) (This is also an example of why the genre SuffersNewbiesPoorly: if you're a healer, you can actually screw over your team by ''being too good''.being a HypercompetentSidekick is good way to ''lose''.)


The genre is largely defined by its setup: each team (typically consisting of 3 or 5 players) has a single base which they must protect at all costs. If their base is destroyed, [[InstantWinCondition they instantly lose]]. This base also serves as a center of operations, containing a shop, a "safe zone"[[note]]usually the spawn point protected by a PurposefullyOverpowered turret[[/note]], a rapid healing location for heroes and the point of return for [[WarpWhistle "recall"]] spells. This base is protected by a series of "towers", defensive buildings set out in lines radiating away from the base. These towers deal considerable damage to any enemy which comes within range and grant allied players vision over that portion of the battlefield. In most games, there are 2-4 rows of these "towers" protecting each base, resulting in the towers gradually moving closer together the nearer they are to the base [[note]]they become more easily defended the more towers are lost at the cost of map control[[/note]].

As the game progresses, AI-controlled minions (sometimes called "lane creeps" or just "creeps") spawn at each team's base and proceed along pre-programmed paths ("lanes"), traveling from allied tower to allied tower before assaulting the enemy towers. These minions will attack any enemy they come across such as opposing minions, opposing towers and opposing players. There are almost always fewer lanes than there are players - three player games typically have two lanes, while five player games typically have three lanes.

In-between these lanes is a region known as "the jungle", containing un-allied units (referred to as "neutral creeps" or "monsters") more powerful than minions which attack any unit from either team they come across - however, as these units remain in the jungle, they almost only ever encounter the players[[note]]coming into contact with minions is generally attributed to GoodBadBugs[[/note]].

Many games also include several powerful monsters in the jungle, weaker than a player character but dangerous to a badly wounded hero. Killing these monsters give [[StatusBuff some bonus]] for a short amount of time. One or two monsters in the jungle which are considerably more powerful than any hero, requiring coordination from the entire team to take down but grant large team-wide awards for killing them.

Each player controls a single [[HeroUnit "hero" character unit]]. This character is considerably more powerful than any minion and the normal creeps in the jungle but less powerful than any tower, meaning it is easy for them to kill minions but assaulting a tower on their own is suicidal. Every hero unit has a unique set of abilities and statistics. A team is usually only allowed a single copy of any given hero. As a result, teams have a diverse membership of heroes, each filling different roles.

Hero units in the game grow inherently more powerful over time. Towers are either exempted from this or grow at a slower rate, meaning that the towers will [[DeathOfAThousandCuts inevitably be brought down by damage from both the minions and heroes]]. Player heroes gain power by killing enemy minions, neutral creeps, towers and enemy heroes. In many games, [[LeakedExperience merely being around a killed enemy unit]] gives a hero ExperiencePoints and/or money, but directly killing a creep will either give them a resource they don't gain passively (usually a StatusBuff) or more of that resource - usually money. This mechanic makes up the core of the gameplay. The opposing heroes want to do the same thing, trying to kill the allied units in order to accumulate experience and money[[note]]some games allow [[BadBoss killing of your own minions]] to deny the enemy their rewards[[/note]]. Due to the lanes, allied minions will always go directly into contact with enemy minions and there are only a limited number of neutral monsters in the jungle to kill, forcing players to inevitably come into conflict with each other.

This conflict is accentuated by three additional factors. First, heroes are extremely valuable to kill, granting large amounts of money and experience. In many games[[note]]but increasingly being dropped due to the popularity of VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends[[/note]], this is doubly harmful as the hero who is killed outright loses money. Secondly, if an enemy hero is killed or forced to retreat, there is no opposition while you kill enemy minions, racking up money and experience. This also denies the enemy hero the opportunity to do the same, damaging their ability to accumulate power and resources. Thirdly, if a lane is left undefended, it is easier to "push" the lane (leading allied minions in an attack on an enemy tower, which is typically programmed to prioritize killing minions, allowing you to damage it in relative anonymity).

As a result, a great deal of the interplay between the players and the teams comes from risk and reward; being more aggressive may make it easier to kill lots of enemy units, drive off enemy heroes, accumulate money more quickly, and damage enemy towers, but it also may leave you more vulnerable to counterattacks from enemy heroes, whether they be in the lane with you or ambushing you from the jungle (or both!). It should also be pointed out that the InstantWinCondition involves demolishing the enemy’s central building; killing enemy heroes will help you do this by giving you EXP, Gold and the freedom to roam around the map in safety (at least, until those enemies respawn), but that's ''all'' it does. It's entirely possible to "backdoor" a base by dodging the enemy team entirely and going straight to their core; likewise, it's possible to "team-wipe" the opposition, killing all five of them with no losses to your own side, but then not accomplish any useful demolition while they're dead.

As heroes accumulate experience, they typically passively gain extra HitPoints and Mana, as well as deal additional damage, but also usually gain other benefits as well, such as gaining access to new abilities or more powerful versions of the abilities they already possess; in many games, the player gets to choose which ability to make stronger at each level. However, the really critical resource tends to be money; while levels are very important, money allows a hero to buy items or other upgrades, which make them more powerful and sometimes grant them additional speed or special abilities they would otherwise lack. Unlike experience, money can only be spent when the hero returns to base (or respawns at base after their death), meaning that heroes must periodically retreat from the front lines in order to buy items or upgrades at their base, leaving temporary holes in their teams' defenses, but making them more powerful and better able to kill enemy minions and fight off enemy heroes.

to:

The genre is largely defined by its setup: each team (typically consisting of 3 or 5 players) has a single base which they must protect at all costs. If their base is destroyed, [[InstantWinCondition they instantly lose]]. This base also serves as a center of operations, containing a shop, a "safe zone"[[note]]usually the spawn point protected by a PurposefullyOverpowered turret[[/note]], a rapid healing location for heroes and the point of return for [[WarpWhistle "recall"]] spells. This base is protected by a series of "towers", defensive buildings set out in lines radiating away from the base. These towers deal considerable damage to any enemy which comes within range and grant allied players vision over that portion of the battlefield. In most games, there are 2-4 rows of these "towers" protecting each base, resulting in the towers gradually moving closer together the nearer they are to the base [[note]]they become more easily defended the more towers are lost at the cost of map control[[/note]].

control[[/note]].\\
\\
As the game progresses, AI-controlled minions (sometimes called "lane creeps" or just "creeps") spawn at each team's base and proceed along pre-programmed paths ("lanes"), traveling from allied tower to allied tower before assaulting the enemy towers. These minions will attack any enemy they come across such as opposing minions, opposing towers and opposing players. There are almost always fewer lanes than there are players - maps with three player games players per team typically have two lanes, while five player games five-player teams typically have brawl over three lanes.

lanes.\\
\\
In-between these lanes is a region known as "the jungle", containing un-allied units (referred to as "neutral creeps" or "monsters") more powerful than minions which attack any unit from either team they come across - however, as these units remain in the jungle, they almost only ever encounter the players[[note]]coming into contact with minions is generally attributed to GoodBadBugs[[/note]].

GoodBadBugs[[/note]].\\
\\
Many games also include several powerful monsters in the jungle, weaker than a player character but dangerous to a badly wounded hero. Killing these monsters give [[StatusBuff some bonus]] for a short amount of time. One or two monsters in the jungle which are considerably more powerful than any hero, requiring coordination from the entire team to take down but grant large team-wide awards for killing them. \n\n\\
\\
Each player controls a single [[HeroUnit "hero" character unit]]. This character is considerably more powerful than any minion and the normal creeps in the jungle but less powerful than any tower, meaning it is easy for them to kill minions but assaulting a tower on their own is suicidal. Every hero unit has a unique set of abilities and statistics. A team is usually only allowed a single copy of any given hero. As a result, teams have a diverse membership of heroes, each filling different roles.

roles.\\
\\
Hero units in the game grow inherently more powerful over time. Towers are either exempted from this or grow at a slower rate, meaning that the towers will [[DeathOfAThousandCuts inevitably be brought down by damage from both the minions and heroes]]. Player heroes gain power by killing enemy minions, neutral creeps, towers and enemy heroes. In many games, [[LeakedExperience merely being around a killed enemy unit]] gives a hero ExperiencePoints and/or money, but directly killing a creep will either give them a resource they don't gain passively (usually a StatusBuff) or more of that resource - usually money. This mechanic makes up the core of the gameplay. The opposing heroes want to do the same thing, trying to kill the allied units in order to accumulate experience and money[[note]]some games allow [[BadBoss killing of your own minions]] to deny the enemy their rewards[[/note]]. Due to the lanes, allied minions will always go directly into contact with enemy minions and there are only a limited number of neutral monsters in the jungle to kill, forcing players to inevitably come into conflict with each other.

other.\\
\\
This conflict is accentuated by three additional factors. First, heroes are extremely valuable to kill, granting killing an enemy hero provides large amounts of money and experience. In many games[[note]]but increasingly being dropped due to the popularity of VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends[[/note]], original ''[=DotA=]'', this is doubly harmful as the hero who is killed outright loses money.''loses'' money, though many other games have dropped this penalty because it's too harsh. Secondly, if an enemy hero is killed or forced to retreat, there is no opposition while you kill enemy minions, racking up money and experience. This also denies the enemy hero the opportunity to do the same, damaging their ability to accumulate power and resources. Thirdly, if a lane is left undefended, it is easier to "push" the lane (leading lane: leading allied minions in an attack on an enemy tower, which is typically programmed to prioritize killing minions, allowing you ''you'' to damage it in relative anonymity).

anonymity.\\
\\
As a result, a great deal of the interplay between the players and the teams comes from risk and reward; being more aggressive may make it easier to kill lots of enemy units, drive off enemy heroes, accumulate money more quickly, and damage enemy towers, but it also may leave you more vulnerable to counterattacks from enemy heroes, whether they be in the lane with you or ambushing you from the jungle (or both!). It should also be pointed out that the InstantWinCondition involves demolishing the enemy’s central building; killing enemy heroes will help you do this by giving you EXP, Gold and the freedom to roam around the map in safety (at least, until those enemies respawn), but that's ''all'' it does. It's entirely possible to "backdoor" a base by dodging the enemy team entirely and going straight to their core; likewise, it's possible to "team-wipe" the opposition, killing all five of them with no losses to your own side, but then not accomplish any useful demolition while they're dead.

dead.\\
\\
As heroes accumulate experience, they typically passively gain extra HitPoints and Mana, as well as deal additional damage, but also usually gain other benefits as well, such as gaining access to new abilities or more powerful versions of the abilities they already possess; in many games, the player gets to choose which ability to make stronger at each level. However, the really critical resource tends to be money; while levels are very important, money allows a hero to buy items or other upgrades, which make them more powerful and sometimes grant them additional speed or special abilities they would otherwise lack. Unlike experience, money can only be spent when the hero returns to base (or respawns at base after their death), meaning that heroes must periodically retreat from the front lines in order to buy items or upgrades at their base, leaving temporary holes in their teams' defenses, but making them more powerful and better able to kill enemy minions and fight off enemy heroes.
heroes.\\
\\



* The Caster: Frequently acts as a secondary carry of sorts. Where the Carry puts out DeathOfAThousandCuts, Casters tend to be reliant on their abilities to do bursts of damage, but they can also place [[StandardStatusEffects debilitating penalties upon enemy heroes]] or [[HerdHittingAttack control the battlefield]] in such a way to make it harder for the enemy to bring their power to bear. Like the carry, these characters tend to start out weak but end the game with a great deal of power. Unlike carries, they may be poor at destroying towers due to their main damage coming from their abilities, which (in some games) towers are immune to.

to:

* The Caster: Frequently acts as a secondary carry of sorts. Where the Carry puts out DeathOfAThousandCuts, Casters tend to be reliant on their abilities to do bursts of damage, but they can also place [[StandardStatusEffects debilitating penalties upon enemy heroes]] or [[HerdHittingAttack control the battlefield]] in such a way to make it harder for the enemy to bring their power to bear. Like the carry, these characters tend to start out weak but end the game with a great deal of power. Unlike carries, they may be poor at destroying towers due to towers: in some games, their main damage coming from source of damage, their abilities, which (in some games) towers are immune to.cannot be used on buildings.



Aside from these generalized roles, MOBA characters and items can have similarities a lot they make up their own archetypes within the genre. Check [[Analysis/MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena here]] for such occurrences.

Late in the game, after heroes have accumulated significant amounts of experience and money, they will typically take a more aggressive stance and start actively trying to destroy enemy towers, as well as try and gang up and destroy the special, more powerful monsters in the jungle to gain team-wide bonuses; frequently, this forces the enemy team to deploy against them in response. These situations where whole teams come into conflict are known as "team fights", and can frequently vastly shift the balance of power as multiple heroes from one team might be killed and forced to wait to respawn at base; a decisive team fight, where an entire team is trapped and eliminated, can frequently cost the eliminated team the game. Many games increase the amount of time a hero is forced to wait to respawn after they are killed later in the game, making such losses even more painful.

While enemy heroes may have their own HitPoints, the health of your team as a whole is measured in its buildings. The core building, remember, is the InstantWinCondition, and destroying it by any means, at any time, results in victory. Additionally, as you lose your outer towers, you lose map control; the FogOfWar spreads, giving the enemy team more opportunities to ambush you. Finally, within your base are typically important buildings which, if destroyed, actually unlock ''extra {{mook}}s for the enemy team'', tilting the game further in their favor.

UnstableEquilibrium is a big factor in [=MOBAs=]. Early-game mistakes can result in one team or another gaining an early advantage, which makes it easier for them to win later confrontations, giving them a larger advantage with every victory. There are plenty of ways to hand your opponent advantages too, from [[LeeroyJenkins starting a fight you can't win]] to [[LazyBackup failing to show up at a fight you could've]], from [[SkewedPriorities being at the wrong place at the wrong time]] to [[HowDoIShotWeb being at the right place at the wrong time]]. The end result is that matches can often be decided long before either base is in even remote danger of destruction. Numbers are also critically important; at competitive levels of play, teams will often disengage after losing only ''one'' of their members, because their absence is already enough to virtually guarantee victory to the enemy team. NeverSplitTheParty in a MOBA. Finally, because hero characters are (deliberately) limited in what they can bring to the table, a lack of teamwork can spell disaster. You might play a perfect game, execute everything correctly, avoid needless damage, get a ton of kills... and still lose, because someone on your team dropped their responsibilities. Even worse, if your team doesn’t plan to do what you want them to, you might not be able to play your game ''at all''; you may be forced to use your character to do things s/he isn’t good at or even ''is designed to be bad at'', leaving a sour taste in one’s mouth—even if said non-cooperative teammates go on to win the game (''especially'' if).

The end result is that people can get ''really'' angry when playing a MOBA. Their communities are infamously toxic; they [[SuffersNewbiesPoorly Suffer Newbies Poorly]] and blast [[IneffectualLoner weak team players]]. Many of these games have devoted communities to which the game in question is very much SeriousBusiness, and due to the inherent difficulties in measuring the contribution of individual players on teams, matchmaking between individual players for pick-up games tends to lead to much more varied skill levels of players on a given team than for games with more individually-tailored rating systems, especially in games with five or more players on a side. This, plus the basics of human psychology, results in a recipe for {{GIFT}} and {{Griefing}}, and all of the DOTA clones, due to the relatively long matches and teamwork-centric game design, suffer from this to a great extent.

to:

Aside from these generalized roles, MOBA characters and items can have similarities a lot they make up their own archetypes within the genre. Check [[Analysis/MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena here]] for such occurrences.

occurrences.\\
\\
Late in the game, after heroes have accumulated significant amounts of experience and money, they will typically take a more aggressive stance and start actively trying to destroy enemy towers, as well as try and gang up and destroy the special, more powerful monsters in the jungle to gain team-wide bonuses; frequently, this forces the enemy team to deploy against them in response. These situations where whole teams come into conflict are known as "team fights", and can frequently vastly shift the balance of power as multiple heroes from one team might be killed and forced to wait to respawn at base; a decisive team fight, where an entire team is trapped and eliminated, can frequently cost the eliminated team the game. Many games increase the amount of time a hero is forced to wait to Typically, respawn after they are killed later in timers also get longer as the game, dead hero in question gains levels, making such losses even more painful.

painful.\\
\\
While enemy heroes may have their own HitPoints, the health of your team as a whole is measured in its buildings. The core building, remember, is the InstantWinCondition, and destroying it by any means, at any time, results in victory. Additionally, as you lose your outer towers, you lose map control; the FogOfWar spreads, giving the enemy team more opportunities to ambush you. Finally, within your base are typically important buildings which, if destroyed, actually unlock ''extra {{mook}}s for the enemy team'', tilting the game further in their favor.

favor.\\
\\
UnstableEquilibrium is a big factor in [=MOBAs=]. Early-game mistakes can result in one team or another gaining an early advantage, which makes it easier for them to win later confrontations, giving them a larger advantage with every victory. There are plenty of ways to hand your opponent advantages too, from [[LeeroyJenkins starting a fight you can't win]] to [[LazyBackup failing to show up at a fight you could've]], could've won]], from [[SkewedPriorities being at the wrong place at the wrong time]] to [[HowDoIShotWeb being at the right place at the wrong time]]. The end result is that matches can often be decided long before either base is in even remote danger of destruction. Numbers are also critically important; at competitive levels of play, teams will often disengage after losing only ''one'' of their members, because their absence is already enough to virtually guarantee victory to the enemy team. NeverSplitTheParty in a MOBA. Finally, because hero characters are (deliberately) limited in what they can bring to the table, a lack of teamwork can spell disaster. You might play a perfect game, execute everything correctly, avoid needless damage, get a ton of kills... and still lose, because someone on your team dropped their responsibilities. Even worse, if your team doesn’t plan to do what you want them to, you might not be able to play your game ''at all''; you may be forced to use your character to do things s/he isn’t good at or even ''is designed to be bad at'', leaving a sour taste in one’s mouth—even if said non-cooperative teammates go on to win the game (''especially'' if).

if).\\
\\
The end result is that people can get ''really'' angry when playing a MOBA. Their communities are infamously toxic; they [[SuffersNewbiesPoorly Suffer Newbies Poorly]] and blast [[IneffectualLoner weak team players]]. Many of these games have devoted communities to which the game in question is very much SeriousBusiness, and due to the inherent difficulties in measuring the contribution of individual players on teams, matchmaking between individual players for pick-up games tends to lead to much more varied skill levels of players on a given team than for games with more individually-tailored rating systems, especially in games with five or more players on a side. This, plus the basics of human psychology, results in a recipe for {{GIFT}} and {{Griefing}}, and all of the DOTA clones, due to the relatively long matches and teamwork-centric game design, suffer from this to a great extent.
extent.\\
\\


* ''VideoGame/ChaosOnline'', dubbed as 'Korean DOTA' at first, but has more similarities to VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends (though the map is designed like southeast-northwest as opposed to the typical southwest-northeast). Gains its notice when not only they feature crossover from Japanese games, so far ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'', ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' and ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'', it is also imported to Japan (under the name ''Chaos Heroes Online''), dubbed with NamesToKnowInAnime, and those crossover characters get {{Role Reprise}}s by their original actors. The English version lived under closed beta, managed by Aeria Games, and ''yes, the crossover characters get carried over'', until Aeria Games closed it down. However, it's still going on in Japan and Korea.

to:

* ''VideoGame/ChaosOnline'', dubbed as 'Korean DOTA' at first, but has more similarities to VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'' (though the map is designed like southeast-northwest as opposed to the typical southwest-northeast). Gains its notice when not only they feature crossover from Japanese games, so far ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'', ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' and ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'', it is also imported to Japan (under the name ''Chaos Heroes Online''), dubbed with NamesToKnowInAnime, and those crossover characters get {{Role Reprise}}s by their original actors. The English version lived under closed beta, managed by Aeria Games, and ''yes, the crossover characters get carried over'', until Aeria Games closed it down. However, it's still going on in Japan and Korea.


* ''VideoGame/GuardiansOfMiddleEarth'', featuring characters from Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium.


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/GuardiansOfMiddleEarth'', featuring characters from Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium.


Unlike the Dead/Shut Down MOBA below, these titles are not dead yet. However, there was a time that these series used to be great and well liked... until something happened. Now they are no longer the juggernaut they were before, but it would be wrong to call them 'dead' or 'fledging', they may still attract a lot of players, but not as much as they used to.

to:

Unlike the Dead/Shut Down MOBA below, these titles are not dead yet.dead. However, there was a time that these series used to be great and well liked... until something happened. Now they are no longer the juggernaut they were before, but it would be wrong to call them 'dead' or 'fledging', they may still attract a lot of players, but not as much as they used to.


* ''VideoGame/HerzogZwei'' - A UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis game that contains elements of team fights that would inspire the creators of the game below, particularly the 'Fight 'til you destroy enemy base', and 'Your hero always respawn after death'. This is the UrExample of MOBA. Also the precursor of the RealTimeStrategy genre.

to:

* ''VideoGame/HerzogZwei'' - A UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis game that contains elements of team fights that would inspire the creators of the game below, particularly the 'Fight 'til you destroy enemy base', and 'Your hero always respawn after death'. This is the UrExample of MOBA. Also the precursor of the RealTimeStrategy genre.


!!! The Big Four
Currently considered the cream of the crop and the most played games, more likely to get a lot of streamers on the video or rated as the best [=MOBAs=] to date, and more likely to have E-Sport presence. They held the greatest popularities and standing power through TheNewTens, the era where MOBA took stride.

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!!! The Big Four
Three
Currently considered the cream of the crop and the most played games, more likely to get a lot of streamers on the video or rated as the best [=MOBAs=] to date, and more likely to have E-Sport presence. They held the greatest popularities and standing power through TheNewTens, the era where MOBA took stride.
stride, and still continue to do so.



* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm'' - A MOBA made with Heroes and characters from [[Creator/BlizzardEntertainment Blizzard's]] [[Videogame/{{Warcraft}} popular]] [[Videogame/{{Starcraft}} franchises]] [[Videogame/{{Diablo}} and]] [[VideoGame/{{Overwatch}} properties]] (and [[Videogame/TheLostVikings at least one of their older classics]] so far), crossing over and battling in new and original maps, each with their own objectives and twists. It features a shorter average game length and removes items entirely in favor of "Talents". Was originally called Blizzard Dota, and then Blizzard All-Stars, before settling on the current title.

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!!!The Former Stars

Unlike the Dead/Shut Down MOBA below, these titles are not dead yet. However, there was a time that these series used to be great and well liked... until something happened. Now they are no longer the juggernaut they were before, but it would be wrong to call them 'dead' or 'fledging', they may still attract a lot of players, but not as much as they used to.

* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfNewerth'': Originally developed as a direct port of [=DotA=] All-Stars to a new engine, since the ''Warcraft 3'' engine was woefully out of date, it has over the years grown to be different in many respects. Most notably the larger part of heroes developed directly by S2 Games but also several nuances have been changed that Creator/{{Valve|Software}} would not dare touch for fear of [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks upsetting fans of the original mod]]. It was amongst the big titles and the only ones who could challenge ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', but ''VideoGame/{{Dota 2}}'' dethroned it and it lost favor against ''VideoGame/{{Smite}}'' and ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm''. However, ''it's not dead yet'', as it continued to receive update and lurks amongst CultClassic status, as if waiting for the chance to strike back and reclaim its throne.
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm'' - A MOBA made with Heroes and characters from [[Creator/BlizzardEntertainment Blizzard's]] [[Videogame/{{Warcraft}} popular]] [[Videogame/{{Starcraft}} franchises]] [[Videogame/{{Diablo}} and]] [[VideoGame/{{Overwatch}} properties]] (and [[Videogame/TheLostVikings at least one of their older classics]] so far), crossing over and battling in new and original maps, each with their own objectives and twists. It features a shorter average game length and removes items entirely in favor of "Talents". Was originally called Blizzard Dota, and then Blizzard All-Stars, before settling on the current title.
title. Unfortunately, Blizzard committed a certain mismanagement that caused them to pull the game from the e-sports scene, thereby losing a lot of attention and players. It's still played and managed by its development team, but mostly concentrates on non-e-sport scenes (such as quick plays), thus losing its spot as one of the big ones.



* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfNewerth'': Originally developed as a direct port of [=DotA=] All-Stars to a new engine, since the ''Warcraft 3'' engine was woefully out of date, it has over the years grown to be different in many respects. Most notably the larger part of heroes developed directly by S2 Games but also several nuances have been changed that Creator/{{Valve|Software}} would not dare touch for fear of [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks upsetting fans of the original mod]]. It was amongst the big titles and the only ones who could challenge ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'', but ''VideoGame/{{Dota 2}}'' dethroned it and it lost favor against ''VideoGame/{{Smite}}'' and ''VideoGame/HeroesOfTheStorm''. However, ''it's not dead yet'', as it continued to receive update and lurks amongst CultClassic status, as if waiting for the chance to strike back and reclaim its throne.


* ''VideoGame/MondayNightCombat'', a hybrid of the genre with Third Person Shooter.
** Its sequel, ''Super Monday Night Combat'', follows the formula more closely, but still blends it with a Third Person Shooter.


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* ''VideoGame/MondayNightCombat'', a hybrid of the genre with Third Person Shooter.
** Its sequel, ''Super Monday Night Combat'', followed the formula more closely, but still blended it with a Third Person Shooter.


* ''VideoGame/AtlasReactor'': A TurnBasedStrategy game based around ''VideoGame/FrozenSynapse'' (or ''TabletopGame/{{Diplomacy}}'', for the tabletop enthusiasts)-style simultaneous turns planned in advance.


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* ''VideoGame/AtlasReactor'': A TurnBasedStrategy game based around ''VideoGame/FrozenSynapse'' (or ''TabletopGame/{{Diplomacy}}'', for the tabletop enthusiasts)-style simultaneous turns planned in advance.


* ''VideoGame/{{Gigantic}}'', a third person MOBA by Motiga with a distinct cel-shaded art style. Gigantic eschews the normal jungle based combat with various side arenas which spawn minions for the team that controls them, as well as being based around the gigantic beasts who replace the normal crystal at the end.


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* ''VideoGame/{{Gigantic}}'', a third person MOBA by Motiga with a distinct cel-shaded art style. Gigantic eschews the normal jungle based combat with various side arenas which spawn minions for the team that controls them, as well as being based around the gigantic beasts who replace the normal crystal at the end.


* SeriousBusiness: This is par for the course in ''any'' PvP game, but practically a genre trait in MOBA games.

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* SeriousBusiness: This is par for the course in ''any'' PvP [=PvP=] game, but practically a genre trait in MOBA games.


* ''VideoGame/ChaosOnline'', dubbed as 'Korean DOTA' at first, but has more similarities to VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends (though the map is designed like southeast-northwest as opposed to the typical southwest-northeast). Gains its notice when not only they feature crossover from Japanese games, so far ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'', ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' and ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'', it is also imported to Japan (under the name ''Chaos Heroes Online''), dubbed with NamesToKnowInAnime, and those crossover characters get RoleReprisal by their original actors. The English version lived under closed beta, managed by Aeria Games, and ''yes, the crossover characters get carried over'', until Aeria Games closed it down. However, it's still going on in Japan and Korea.

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* ''VideoGame/ChaosOnline'', dubbed as 'Korean DOTA' at first, but has more similarities to VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends (though the map is designed like southeast-northwest as opposed to the typical southwest-northeast). Gains its notice when not only they feature crossover from Japanese games, so far ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'', ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' and ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'', it is also imported to Japan (under the name ''Chaos Heroes Online''), dubbed with NamesToKnowInAnime, and those crossover characters get RoleReprisal {{Role Reprise}}s by their original actors. The English version lived under closed beta, managed by Aeria Games, and ''yes, the crossover characters get carried over'', until Aeria Games closed it down. However, it's still going on in Japan and Korea.


* '' [[VideoGame/StrifeMOBA Strife]]'', a MOBA developed by the same people behind ''Heroes of Newerth''. While introducing player customization such as custom recipes, the game is also balanced to reduce the distinction between roles by giving shared creep bounty, adequate scaling to all heroes, and even removing wards.


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* '' [[VideoGame/StrifeMOBA Strife]]'', a MOBA developed by the same people behind ''Heroes of Newerth''. While introducing player customization such as custom recipes, the game was also balanced for a more casual experience by giving shared creep bounty, revising scaling for all heroes, and even removing wards.


* DuelingGames: The rivalry between ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'' and ''VideoGame/Dota2'' is quite possibly ''THE'' most vicious and hate-fueled clash in gaming history, easily surpassing the [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]]/[[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]] rivalry of the early 90s or the more recent ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' vs ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' conflict in sheer vitriol. The two fanbases simply cannot tolerate the mere ''existence'' of the other, with ''Dota 2'' players treating ''[=LoL=]'' as a dumbed-down, childish rip-off played by immature, unskilled babies [[ItsHardSoItSucks too pathetic to play a real game]], while the ''[=LoL=]'' players consider ''Dota 2'' to be an obsolete, clunky, intentionally-overcomplicated dinosaur of a game played by arrogant, elitist snobs who [[ItsEasySoItSucks equate "difficulty" with "quality"]]. The fact that both games are considered to have among the most toxic and unpleasant communities in all of gaming certainly does not help matters. Other games in the genre only avoid similar bashing from these communities by virtue of being smaller targets.

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* DuelingGames: The rivalry between ''VideoGame/LeagueOfLegends'' and ''VideoGame/Dota2'' is quite possibly ''THE'' most vicious and hate-fueled clash in gaming history, easily surpassing the [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]]/[[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Mario]]/[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]] rivalry of the early 90s or the more recent ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' vs ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' conflict in sheer vitriol. The two fanbases simply cannot tolerate the mere ''existence'' of the other, with ''Dota 2'' players treating ''[=LoL=]'' as a dumbed-down, childish rip-off played by immature, unskilled babies [[ItsHardSoItSucks too pathetic to play a real game]], while the ''[=LoL=]'' players consider ''Dota 2'' to be an obsolete, clunky, intentionally-overcomplicated dinosaur of a game played by arrogant, elitist snobs who [[ItsEasySoItSucks equate "difficulty" with "quality"]]. The fact that both games are considered to have among the most toxic and unpleasant communities in all of gaming certainly does not help matters. Other games in the genre only avoid similar bashing from these communities by virtue of being smaller targets.

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