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** This is examined at length in [[DoctorWho2017CSTwiceUponATime "Twice Upon a Time"]], the Twelfth Doctor's GrandFinale, in which he meets and has to work with the First Doctor shortly before ''both'' of them are due to regenerate. One is not thrilled by Twelve's bold actions and declarations that he protects Earth from beings like the Testimony, and from there he's downright frightened to learn about the conflicts his future selves will be involved in and the reputation he will gain as "The Doctor of War" (among other names) in the process. Twelve is humbled by One's cooler, calmer approach to the crisis, which allows him to notice things Twelve does not, and the {{Novelization}} has Twelve additionally realize that One is the only Doctor [[BewareTheSuperman who never got carried away in his heroics to his and others' detriment]]. On the other side of the coin, One's more cynical view of the universe, particularly his view that GoodIsImpotent, and his inability to realize that he is already a HopeBringer is questioned by Twelve's companion when she asks him exactly what he set out from Gallifrey to find in the first place. Later, the climax and denouement has Twelve showing One that being "The Doctor of War" is as much about hope and healing as it is fighting and sorrow, which helps One accept regeneration at last.

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** This is examined at length in [[DoctorWho2017CSTwiceUponATime [[Recap/DoctorWho2017CSTwiceUponATime "Twice Upon a Time"]], the Twelfth Doctor's GrandFinale, in which he meets and has to work with the First Doctor shortly before ''both'' of them are due to regenerate. One is not thrilled by Twelve's bold actions and declarations that he protects Earth from beings like the Testimony, and from there he's downright frightened to learn about the conflicts his future selves will be involved in and the reputation he will gain as "The Doctor of War" (among other names) in the process. Twelve is humbled by One's cooler, calmer approach to the crisis, which allows him to notice things Twelve does not, and the {{Novelization}} has Twelve additionally realize that One is the only Doctor [[BewareTheSuperman who never got carried away in his heroics to his and others' detriment]]. On the other side of the coin, One's more cynical view of the universe, particularly his view that GoodIsImpotent, and his inability to realize that he is already a HopeBringer is questioned by Twelve's companion when she asks him exactly what he set out from Gallifrey to find in the first place. Later, the climax and denouement has Twelve showing One that being "The Doctor of War" is as much about hope and healing as it is fighting and sorrow, which helps One accept regeneration at last.


* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger on two different occasions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretensions of grandeur.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - -- yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger on two different occasions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretensions of grandeur.grandeur.
** This is examined at length in [[DoctorWho2017CSTwiceUponATime "Twice Upon a Time"]], the Twelfth Doctor's GrandFinale, in which he meets and has to work with the First Doctor shortly before ''both'' of them are due to regenerate. One is not thrilled by Twelve's bold actions and declarations that he protects Earth from beings like the Testimony, and from there he's downright frightened to learn about the conflicts his future selves will be involved in and the reputation he will gain as "The Doctor of War" (among other names) in the process. Twelve is humbled by One's cooler, calmer approach to the crisis, which allows him to notice things Twelve does not, and the {{Novelization}} has Twelve additionally realize that One is the only Doctor [[BewareTheSuperman who never got carried away in his heroics to his and others' detriment]]. On the other side of the coin, One's more cynical view of the universe, particularly his view that GoodIsImpotent, and his inability to realize that he is already a HopeBringer is questioned by Twelve's companion when she asks him exactly what he set out from Gallifrey to find in the first place. Later, the climax and denouement has Twelve showing One that being "The Doctor of War" is as much about hope and healing as it is fighting and sorrow, which helps One accept regeneration at last.

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* In terms of characterization, one could argue [[Franchise/{{Transformers}} Optimus Prime]] has been going through a gradual Messianic creep, While his nature as the heroic BigGood and the leader of the Autobots, more modern series have slowly been making him more of a straight-up messianic figure, where the G1 take still had the time to play Basketball, later incarnations (excluding the [[ClassicalAntiHero Transformers Animated]] take, whose rebooted identity exists entirely to move ''away'' from Prime's messianic shift) such as the Transformers film series have shown him to be a sad, and entirely serious figure, yet one that still had it in him to make one liners. The Aligned version starts out somewhat similarly in [[VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron his video game series]], but over time, becomes the somber, stoic yet [[ColdHam suitably dramatic]] figure in TransformersPrime, finally climaxing in a [[HeroicSacrifice scene where he willingly becomes one with the Allspark to give create a new generation of Cybertronian life]].


[[IThoughtItMeant This does not mean]] a Messiah who's a creep. Although [[DarkMessiah that also happens]].

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[[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant This does not mean]] a Messiah who's a creep. Although [[DarkMessiah that also happens]].


Note that not all characters falling into the MessianicArchetype are victims of MessiahCreep--it's about the archetype ''overriding'' previous characterization. If the character fell into the archetype from the beginning, it is NotAnExample.

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Note that not all characters falling into the MessianicArchetype are victims of MessiahCreep--it's Messiah Creep: it's about the archetype ''overriding'' previous characterization. If the character fell into the archetype from the beginning, it is NotAnExample.


* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger at two different occassions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretensions of grandeur.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger at on two different occassions occasions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretensions of grandeur.



* Flash from ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', though this is a slightly unusual example, since he's only one of seven equally main characters and therefore not technically ''the'' hero. At least, no more so than the other six. He starts out as the [[KidAppealCharacter immature rookie]] of the group, with a leaning towards the idealistic approach and a tendency to hit on people. But this is followed by the implication that his influence is keeping the League out of KnightTemplar territory and a reoccurring tendency to try helping ''everyone'' that eventually leads to marking him as a MessianicArchetype.

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* Flash from ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'', though this is a slightly unusual example, since he's only one of seven equally main characters and therefore not technically ''the'' hero. At least, no more so than the other six. He starts out as the [[KidAppealCharacter immature rookie]] of the group, with a leaning towards the idealistic approach and a tendency to hit on people. But this is followed by the implication that his influence is keeping the League out of KnightTemplar territory and a reoccurring recurring tendency to try helping ''everyone'' that eventually leads to marking him as a MessianicArchetype.


* Appears in universe in ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'', where Seerdomin slowly realizes that he's becoming a figure of salvation to the followers of the deity known as the Redeemer, because his daily visits to their god's barrow keep undesirables at bay. He is deeply conflicted about this, since while his deeds may seem heroic to outsiders, he is mainly in it for personal reasons.

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* Appears in universe in the ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'', where Seerdomin slowly realizes that he's becoming a figure of salvation to the followers of the deity known as the Redeemer, because his daily visits to their god's barrow keep undesirables at bay. He is deeply conflicted about this, since while his deeds may seem heroic to outsiders, he is mainly in it for personal reasons.


* The original ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' is a clear-cut example: Usagi was initially TheChick, but became and was actually called the Messiah by the third season. Coupled with Minako's {{Flanderization}}, it caused them to swap roles, promoting Usagi to TheHero and reducing Minako to TheChick.

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* The original ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' anime is a clear-cut example: Usagi was initially TheChick, but became and was actually called the Messiah by the third season. Coupled with Minako's {{Flanderization}}, it caused them to swap roles, promoting Usagi to TheHero and reducing Minako to TheChick.


* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' is a clear-cut example: Usagi was initially TheChick, but became and was actually called the Messiah by the third season. Coupled with Minako's {{Flanderization}}, it caused them to swap roles, promoting Usagi to TheHero and reducing Minako to TheChick.

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* *The original ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' is a clear-cut example: Usagi was initially TheChick, but became and was actually called the Messiah by the third season. Coupled with Minako's {{Flanderization}}, it caused them to swap roles, promoting Usagi to TheHero and reducing Minako to TheChick.

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** The trend continues in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' with the Phantom Thieves starting out as flawed characters seeking to change society for justice, revenge or fame using morally questionable means, [[spoiler:and end up being treated as genuine heroes by saving the world from a controlling god born from the masses still using the same questionable methods]].


* Sora, from Franchise/KingdomHearts, was always a save-the-world kind of hero. But as the series went on, he went from being a kid who, through a mix of skill and coincidence, ended up saving the multiverse to a kid so heroic that he was saving people's lives [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep minutes after being born]] and the only one who can bring back all of the [[NeverSayDie sleeping]] [[DoomedProtagonist doomed heroes of the games he doesn't appear in.]]

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* Sora, from Franchise/KingdomHearts, was always a save-the-world kind of hero. But as the series went on, he went from being a kid who, through a mix of skill and coincidence, ended up saving the multiverse to a kid so heroic that he was saving people's lives [[VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep minutes after being born]] and the only one who can bring back all of the [[NeverSayDie sleeping]] [[DoomedProtagonist sleeping doomed heroes of the games he doesn't appear in.]]


* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger at two different occassions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretentions of grandeur.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger at two different occassions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretentions pretensions of grandeur. grandeur.
* ''Series/{{Community}}'': Troy went from a surprisingly talented air conditioner repair student to "the Truest Repairman," the ChosenOne foretold in ancient prophecy. The Vice-Dean helps Troy take down a dictatorial regime solely to get him into the school, and isolates him from his friends in order to teach him all the ancient ways of the secret order of Air Condition Repair Men. Troy, for his part, finds the cultish attitudes of the Air Conditioner Repair Annex to be weird and confusing, and repeatedly tells them to stop taking it so seriously, since it's just a two-year degree.
-->'''Troy:''' Yeah, I told the Air-Conditioning Repair School that they had to start acting like a normal school. I can do that, cuz I'm their Messiah.

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* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', despite Toriyama's claim that Goku can be a selfish person who will put a good fight ahead of everything, Goku experience this even in the original manga. As a child, he was selfish in that he would only protect those he personally bonded with and he had no problem causing great physical harm or killing his enemies if provoked. As he grew older, he becomes more protective of humanity in general, to the point that he goes out of his way to revive the Dragon Balls during the Cell Games after Cell murdered the world army. He's also more picky about who he kills to the point of trying to spare monsters like Frieza and tries to defeat his enemies with minimum force.

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* ''Franchise/{{Blazblue}}'', from beginning to end, is the story of how [[spoiler:a grumpy, anti-social wanted criminal who adopts the "Grim Reaper" as a moniker to frighten people eventually becomes the ''literal'' god of death and saves all mankind and reality itself from destruction.]]


* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger at two different occassions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than a BoringInvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretentions of grandeur.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor began as a selfish, irritable old man on the run from his own species. He did save people, but it was more because he happened to be around than because of any higher calling. Around the time of the Fourth Doctor's tenure, religious subtext began to appear, but it was very subtle and deployed with some actual weight behind it when it appeared, and he was still mostly an 'intergalactic bumbler'. By the time of the Tenth Doctor's tenure he's striking crucifix poses and being revived by the power of prayer. Though it needs to be said that the ending phase of Tenth's adventures involved deliberate {{deconstruction}} of his heroism creeping into the storylines. With the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor, the deconstruction was in full swing - yes, the Doctor is still doing his best to be heroic, but the prideful implications of ChronicHeroSyndrome are increasingly examined. Companions and even random people call him out far more often on his vain or questionable moments. (When he claims in a fit of anger at two different occassions that he's "answerable to no one", his then companions look at him with instant distrust and outright tell him he's being arrogant and scary.) Plenty of people felt the more critical view of the character by the writers made him more interesting and believable again, rather than a BoringInvincibleHero an InvincibleHero or DesignatedHero with pretentions of grandeur.

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