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* In ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', in one episode, Tony and Ziva are [[spoiler:captured in a mock war games event and]] met by a man who talks with them briefly, hands them a coin before leaving. Ziva, confused, asks what happened. Tony replies two things, something bigger than them is going on, and two, they will never have to buy drinks at a coin challenge again. The man who gave them his coin? The Secretary of the Navy of the United States.

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* In one episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', in one episode, Tony and Ziva are [[spoiler:captured in a mock war games event and]] met by a man who talks with them briefly, then hands them a coin before leaving. Ziva, confused, asks what happened. Tony replies two things, replies: One, something bigger than them is going on, on; and two, they will never have to buy drinks at a coin challenge again. The man who gave them his coin? The Secretary of the Navy of the United States.

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** In "Mr. Monk and the Class Reunion," Stottlemeyer and Disher realize that their murder suspect in the death of a former UC Berkeley nurse is attending Monk's college reunion because in the struggle, the killer dropped an identifying lapel pin that reunion attendees have to wear to identify themselves. Since there are plenty of spares on hand, Monk isn't able to notice if anyone's lost their lapel pin lately.


* ''Series/{{Columbo}}'': In "Identity Crisis," Henderson and Brenner's stooge Melville make themselves known to each other at the rendezvous by matching the halves of a broken poker chip.
* ''Series/{{Monk}}'':
**In "Mr. Monk Goes to the Carnival," the proof that Monk uses to prove that Leonard Stokes and Kitty Malone know each other is that they both have pins from the same sobriety group that they met in.
**In "Mr. Monk Goes to a Rock Concert," Kris Kedder kills Stork for threatening to expose Kedder as a copyright thief, and tries to stage his death like an accidental drug overdose. However, while staging the scene, he finds Stork's membership pin from his Narcotics Anonymous group and realizes no one's going to buy the cover story unless he makes it seem like Stork had a relapse...which necessitates him having to disguise himself as Stork and make an early morning appointment with an acupuncturist.



* In the US, long medical coats are for attending physicians and residents. Medical students are sometimes referred to as "short coats."

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* In the US, American hospitals, long medical coats are for attending physicians and residents. Medical students are sometimes referred to as "short coats."

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* A non-physical token is called a shibboleth, after a passage in the Book of Judges of the Bible. This can include gang signs, accents, particular jargon, insider knowledge of particular customs, and so on. For example, anyone who pronounces Houston street in New York City the same way the city in Texas is pronounced is immediately branded a tourist.


* A non-physical token is called a shibboleth, after a passage in the Book of Judges of the Bible. This can include gang signs, accents, particular jargon, insider knowledge of particular customs, and so on. For example, anyone who pronounces Houston street in New York City the same way the city in Texas is pronounced is immediately branded a tourist.
** AA members call themselves "friends of Bill W."
** Pacific theater US soldiers used the world "lollapalooza" due to the difficulty it would give native speakers of Japanese.
** Less pleasantly, conspicuous use of certain numbers are callouts and dog-whistles to white supremacist hate groups.
--> And the Gileadites took the passages of Jordan before the Ephraimites: and it was so, that when those Ephraimites which were escaped said, Let me go over; that the men of Gilead said unto him, Art thou an Ephraimite? If he said, Nay; Then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth: and he said Sibboleth: for he could not frame to pronounce it right. Then they took him, and slew him at the passages of Jordan: and there fell at that time of the Ephraimites forty and two thousand. - Judges 12:56 KJV

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** AA members call themselves "friends of Bill W."
** Pacific theater US soldiers used the world "lollapalooza" due to the difficulty it would give native speakers of Japanese.
** Less pleasantly, conspicuous use of certain numbers are callouts and dog-whistles to white supremacist hate groups.

Added DiffLines:

* In the US, long medical coats are for attending physicians and residents. Medical students are sometimes referred to as "short coats."
* A non-physical token is called a shibboleth, after a passage in the Book of Judges of the Bible. This can include gang signs, accents, particular jargon, insider knowledge of particular customs, and so on. For example, anyone who pronounces Houston street in New York City the same way the city in Texas is pronounced is immediately branded a tourist.
--> And the Gileadites took the passages of Jordan before the Ephraimites: and it was so, that when those Ephraimites which were escaped said, Let me go over; that the men of Gilead said unto him, Art thou an Ephraimite? If he said, Nay; Then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth: and he said Sibboleth: for he could not frame to pronounce it right. Then they took him, and slew him at the passages of Jordan: and there fell at that time of the Ephraimites forty and two thousand. - Judges 12:56 KJV


** In some fields, this is less likely than in others. For example, this troper is an aerospace maintainer, one of the first fields (along with pilots from the Army Air Corps era) to practice this tradition. However, he never has his coin on him. Why? It's considered [[TurbineBlender foreign debris]] and can cause mechanical failure. So, while coining may be still practiced, and said coins are collected, the practice of challenging changes from unit to unit and field to field. This troper was taught that only three kinds of guys do challenges: Nonners [[note]]Airmen who are not aircraft maintainers[[/note]], cheapskates, and fresh airmen--none of which you want to be associated with.

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** In some fields, this is less likely than in others. For example, this troper is an aerospace maintainer, one of the first fields (along with pilots from the Army Air Corps era) Aerospace maintainers consider challenge coins to practice this tradition. However, he never has his coin on him. Why? It's considered be [[TurbineBlender foreign debris]] and that can cause mechanical failure. So, while coining may be still practiced, and said coins are collected, the practice of challenging changes from unit to unit and field to field. This troper was It is taught that only three kinds of guys do challenges: Nonners [[note]]Airmen [[note]]airmen who are not aircraft maintainers[[/note]], cheapskates, and fresh airmen--none of which you want to be associated with.


* In ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena,'' the ring with the rose crest instantly identifies Utena as a Rose Duelist to her fellow Duelists, and [[CoolKey allows entry]] to the Secret Forest. But Utena herself no knowledge of the purpose of the ring; she had been carrying it for years as a [[MementoMacGuffin memento of her prince]], who said it would [[BatmanGambit lead her back to him]]. Though the the true meaning of the ring is... complicated.

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* In ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena,'' the ring with the rose crest instantly identifies Utena as a Rose Duelist to her fellow Duelists, and [[CoolKey allows entry]] to the Secret Forest. But Utena herself no knowledge of the purpose of the ring; she had been carrying it for years as a [[MementoMacGuffin memento of her prince]], who said it would [[BatmanGambit lead her back to him]]. Though Still, the the true meaning of the ring is... complicated.



* Challenge Coins date back to a squadron of American pilots during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. One of the pilots, fairly well-off, decided to have a set of coins minted with their squadron's name on it for his squadron mates to have as keepsakes. One of these pilots was shot down, captured, and deprived of his military identification by German troops. An artillery barrage caused enough confusion for him to escape to the Allied lines, where he was able to prove his not being a German spy only by presenting his squadron's coin to the Allied troops. Ever since then, failure to present your coin when challenged results in a severe punishment. That is to say, you [[CoolAndUnusualPunishment buying beers for everybody who has their coins]]. Failing a "Coin Check" while in a large drinking establishment can become...expensive. You can be challenged at any time. Even when you're on the toilet or in the shower. It's [[SeriousBusiness sacred tradition]].
** However, ''because'' it can be so expensive (easily running into the hundreds of dollars, depending on size of the group) many commanding officers have started to forbid the practice outright, or at least severely limit it to very small groups of no more than a certain number and only among personnel of approximately equal rank. Bottom line, many junior enlisted personnel simply don't make enough money to pick up a large bar tab without it meaning they won't be able to afford rent or groceries that month. An officer is asking to get his ass chewed to a bloody rag if his C.O. finds out he coined a group of enlisted men and had one of them pay for all the drinks, including his own.

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* Challenge Coins coins date back to a squadron of American pilots during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. One of the pilots, fairly well-off, decided to have a set of coins minted with their squadron's name on it for his squadron mates to have as keepsakes. One of these pilots was shot down, captured, and deprived of his military identification by German troops. An artillery barrage caused enough confusion for him to escape to the Allied lines, where he was able to prove his not being a German spy only by presenting his squadron's coin to the Allied troops. Ever since then, failure to present your coin when challenged results in a severe punishment. That punishment--that is to say, you [[CoolAndUnusualPunishment buying beers for everybody who has their coins]]. Failing a "Coin Check" "coin check" while in a large drinking establishment can become...become expensive. You can be challenged at any time. Even time, even when you're on the toilet or in the shower. It's [[SeriousBusiness sacred tradition]].
** However, ''because'' it can be so expensive (easily running into the hundreds of dollars, depending on size of the group) group), many commanding officers have started to forbid the practice outright, or at least severely limit it to very small groups of no more than a certain number and only among personnel of approximately equal rank. Bottom line, many junior enlisted personnel simply don't make enough money to pick up a large bar tab without it meaning they won't be able to afford rent or groceries that month. An officer is asking to get his ass chewed to a bloody rag if his C.O. finds out he coined a group of enlisted men and had one of them pay for all the drinks, including his own.



** It is very common for specific groups within the military (ie: a particular Squadron or Company, or a group of soldiers who worked together on some endeavor) to mint coins specific to them, or to commemorate special events.

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** It is very common for specific groups within the military (ie: (i.e. a particular Squadron or Company, or a group of soldiers who worked together on some endeavor) to mint coins specific to them, or to commemorate special events.



** In some fields this is less likely than others. For example, this troper is an aerospace maintainer, one of the first fields along with pilots from the army air core era to practice this tradition. However he never has his coin on him. Why? It's considered [[TurbineBlender foreign debris]] and can cause mechanical failure. So while coining may be still practiced and said coins are collected, the practice of challenging changes from unit to unit and field to field. This trope was taught that only three kinds of guys do challenges, nonners[[note]]Airmen who are not aircraft maintainers[[/note]], cheapskates, and fresh airmen. All of which you don't want to be associated with.

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** In some fields fields, this is less likely than in others. For example, this troper is an aerospace maintainer, one of the first fields along (along with pilots from the army air core era Army Air Corps era) to practice this tradition. However However, he never has his coin on him. Why? It's considered [[TurbineBlender foreign debris]] and can cause mechanical failure. So So, while coining may be still practiced practiced, and said coins are collected, the practice of challenging changes from unit to unit and field to field. This trope troper was taught that only three kinds of guys do challenges, nonners[[note]]Airmen challenges: Nonners [[note]]Airmen who are not aircraft maintainers[[/note]], cheapskates, and fresh airmen. All airmen--none of which you don't want to be associated with.

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** In addition, the Guilders also generate an effect that keeps anyone from working sympathy upon their owner, an invaluable insurance in a setting where you can all too easily kill someone from the next city over with a few drops of their blood.

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* ''Literature/TheKingkillerChronicle'': The [[WizardingSchool Academy]] famously issues lead "Guilders" to its fully accredited arcanists. They have the advantage of being LoyalPhlebotinum bound to their owners through SympatheticMagic, so anyone else who touches one has their hand go numb.


* Many [[TheEngineer engineers]] in the United States and Canada wear cast iron or stainless steel rings on the little finger of their writing hand. This way, whenever they use a pen or pencil, the ring will drag across the writing surface and/or bite into the skin slightly (The Iron Ring used in Canada is faceted rather than completely round, unlike the Engineer's Ring used in the US), reminding them of their [[ComesGreatResponsibility responsibility as engineers.]] Of course, the ring also helps fellow engineers identify each other when out in public.

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* Many [[TheEngineer engineers]] in the United States and Canada wear cast iron or stainless steel rings on the little finger of their writing hand. This way, whenever they use a pen or pencil, the ring will drag across the writing surface and/or bite into the skin slightly (The (the Iron Ring used in Canada is faceted rather than completely round, unlike the Engineer's Ring used in the US), reminding them of their [[ComesGreatResponsibility responsibility as engineers.]] Of course, the ring also helps fellow engineers identify each other when out in public.


** In some fields this is less likely than others. For example, this troper is an aerospace maintainer, one of the first fields along with pilots from the army air core era to practice this tradition. However her never has his coin on him. Why? It's considered [[TurbineBlender foreign debris]] and can cause mechanical failure. So while coining may be still practiced and said coins are collected, the practice of challenging changes from unit to unit and field to field. This trope was taught that only three kinds of guys do challenges, nonners[[note]]Airmen who are not aircraft maintainers[[/note]], cheapskates, and fresh airmen. All of which you don't want to be associated with.

to:

** In some fields this is less likely than others. For example, this troper is an aerospace maintainer, one of the first fields along with pilots from the army air core era to practice this tradition. However her he never has his coin on him. Why? It's considered [[TurbineBlender foreign debris]] and can cause mechanical failure. So while coining may be still practiced and said coins are collected, the practice of challenging changes from unit to unit and field to field. This trope was taught that only three kinds of guys do challenges, nonners[[note]]Airmen who are not aircraft maintainers[[/note]], cheapskates, and fresh airmen. All of which you don't want to be associated with.


** In ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms the Harpers have a symbol they use to identify each other: a small silver harp. After the Moonstars did split off, they use their own variant of the same. Cormyr has Purple Dragons' rings and commanders' rings that (aside of minor magics) allow access to restricted and magically protected areas, like the armory in Purple Dragons' barracks. Of course, these items are badges of service and possession of one by someone not entitled to this is a crime.

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** In ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' the Harpers have a symbol they use to identify each other: a small silver harp. After the Moonstars did split off, they use their own variant of the same. Cormyr has Purple Dragons' rings and commanders' rings that (aside of minor magics) allow access to restricted and magically protected areas, like the armory in Purple Dragons' barracks. Of course, these items are badges of service and possession of one by someone not entitled to this is a crime.


See also CallingCard and MyCard. Can overlap with IconicItem for some of the more famous examples.

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See also CallingCard and MyCard. Can overlap with IconicItem for some of the more famous examples.
examples. Despite the name, no particular relation to any tropes on the TokenIndex.

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