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* Creator/BernardWerber has a character believing into the apocalyptic prophecy in ''Le Miroir de Cassandre'', partially because his mother was from Mayan descent. Another character jokes he will think about him on the morning of December 22, 2012.


Now that December 21, 2012 has come and gone, it's safe to say that this is now a DiscreditedTrope.

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Now that December 21, 2012 has come and gone, it's safe to say that this is now a DiscreditedTrope.
DiscreditedTrope. It made a comeback in early 2021 due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and polarized political climate in the U.S., leading to a lot of dyslexia jokes.

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* Invoked in WebVideo/MothersBasement's "What's so great about Manga/{{Haikyuu}}?":
--> The world didn't end in 2012, but if you were a fan of Japanese high school boys' volleyball, things were certainly looking dire.


[[folder: Tabletop Games]]

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[[folder: Tabletop [[folder:Tabletop Games]]


** '''Fact''': In 1966, an anthropologist named Michael D. Coe pulled a mathematically significant date from the Maya Long Count calendar and concluded (incorrectly) that they believed that this date marked the end of the world. Notably, the date that Coe selected was originally December 24, ''2011'', later revised to January 11, 2013. The 2012 date was first put forward by Robert J. Sharer in 1983. Later research in the '90s suggested that the Maya ''didn't'' see 2012 as the end of the world, but rather, as a cause for partying like it's 1999--that is, it was simply the end of that calendar and the beginning of a new age. The idea of the Maya apocalypse prophecy was then discredited in scholarly circles. By then, however, New Agers and {{conspiracy theorist}}s had latched onto Sharer's revised date, and the rest is (embarrassing) history. Also, whenever the "Mayan" calendar is shown, expect it to [[{{Mayincatec}} actually be the more visually appealing Aztec calendar]].

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** '''Fact''': In 1966, an anthropologist named Michael D. Coe pulled a mathematically significant date from the Maya Long Count calendar and concluded (incorrectly) that they believed that this date marked the end of the world. Notably, the date that Coe selected was originally December 24, ''2011'', later revised to January 11, 2013. The 2012 date was first put forward by Robert J. Sharer in 1983. Later research in the '90s suggested that the Maya ''didn't'' see 2012 as the end of the world, but rather, as a cause for partying like it's 1999--that is, it was simply the end of that calendar and the beginning of a new age. The end of the 13th b'ak'tun (Long Count calendar cycle) simply resulted in the beginning of the 14th b'ak'tun. The ends of the 1st through 12th b'ak'tuns hadn't coincided with any epic disasters, nor had the 1st day of the 1st b'ak'tun. And the fact that only 13 b'ak'tuns are known from the Maya codices is almost certainly because the majority of those scrolls were burned as "heresy" by Catholic priests after the Spanish conquest. The idea of the Maya apocalypse prophecy was then discredited in scholarly circles. By then, however, New Agers and {{conspiracy theorist}}s had latched onto Sharer's revised date, and the rest is (embarrassing) history. Also, whenever the "Mayan" calendar is shown, expect it to [[{{Mayincatec}} actually be the more visually appealing Aztec calendar]].



* Polar shift: Supposedly, the magnetic poles were going to reverse in 2012. Didn't happen, and wouldn't have caused disaster if it had.

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* Polar shift: Supposedly, the magnetic poles were going to reverse in 2012. Didn't happen, and wouldn't have caused disaster if it had. The idea that that this would be disastrous seems to have originated from misunderstanding of what the "polar shift" means. The magnetic poles reverse themselves relatively frequently, averaging once every 2 million years or so. But this doesn't have any significant impact on life; whenever the next geomagnetic reversal happens, the only thing that humans are likely to notice is that compasses will start pointing south instead of north. But the believers of the "polar shift" theory conflated the magnetic poles with the actual ''physical'' poles, at the axis of Earth's rotation. They believed that in 2012, the entire planet would flip 180 degrees on its axis, which would indeed have caused cataclysmic damage. Fortunately, it's also physically impossible for such a thing to just spontaneously happen. It would require an external force, such as [[ColonyDrop another planet colliding with Earth]] at just the right angle[[note]]It's speculated that such an event might by UsefulNotes/{{Venus}} rotates "backwards".[[/note]]...at which point a polar shift would be the least of our problems.


* '''Myth''': The Mayans predicted December 21, 2012 would be the end of the world.
** '''Fact''': In 1966, an anthropologist named Michael D. Coe pulled a mathematically significant date from the Mayan Long Count calendar and concluded (incorrectly) that they believed that this date marked the end of the world. Notably, the date that Coe selected was originally December 24, ''2011'', later revised to January 11, 2013. The 2012 date was first put forward by Robert J. Sharer in 1983. Later research in the '90s suggested that the Mayans ''didn't'' see 2012 as the end of the world, but rather, as a cause for partying like it's 1999--that is, it was simply the end of that calendar and the beginning of a new age. The idea of the Mayan apocalypse prophecy was then discredited in scholarly circles. By then, however, New Agers and {{conspiracy theorist}}s had latched onto Sharer's revised date, and the rest is (embarrassing) history. Also, whenever the "Mayan" calendar is shown, expect it to [[{{Mayincatec}} actually be the more visually appealing Aztec calendar]].

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* '''Myth''': The Mayans [[UsefulNotes/PreColumbianCivilizations Maya civilisation]] predicted December 21, 2012 would be the end of the world.
** '''Fact''': In 1966, an anthropologist named Michael D. Coe pulled a mathematically significant date from the Mayan Maya Long Count calendar and concluded (incorrectly) that they believed that this date marked the end of the world. Notably, the date that Coe selected was originally December 24, ''2011'', later revised to January 11, 2013. The 2012 date was first put forward by Robert J. Sharer in 1983. Later research in the '90s suggested that the Mayans Maya ''didn't'' see 2012 as the end of the world, but rather, as a cause for partying like it's 1999--that is, it was simply the end of that calendar and the beginning of a new age. The idea of the Mayan Maya apocalypse prophecy was then discredited in scholarly circles. By then, however, New Agers and {{conspiracy theorist}}s had latched onto Sharer's revised date, and the rest is (embarrassing) history. Also, whenever the "Mayan" calendar is shown, expect it to [[{{Mayincatec}} actually be the more visually appealing Aztec calendar]].



* The AncientAstronauts who guided the Mayans returning to Earth. In fact, one such theory pointed out that ''Series/TheXFiles'' predicted an AlienInvasion in 2012 and that the creators of the show was trying to warn humanity that way. Why they would choose to do this through the plot of a TV show instead of going to the public is unknown.

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* The AncientAstronauts who guided the Mayans Maya returning to Earth. In fact, one such theory pointed out that ''Series/TheXFiles'' predicted an AlienInvasion in 2012 and that the creators of the show was trying to warn humanity that way. Why they would choose to do this through the plot of a TV show instead of going to the public is unknown.

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* The ''WebVideo/QuintonReviews'' episode "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ML5wQsGynQs That Time the World Ended]]" discusses and mocks various failed doomsday predictions, with an emphasis on the 2012 one.


** '''Fact''': The only years Nostradamus mentions by name in his quatrains are 1999 and 3797. Of course, he could be talking about 2012 in some of his other quatrains. Or he could not. That's the magic of Nostradamus -- he was so vague that you can interpret him however you like, which is where his "correct" predictions come from.

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** '''Fact''': The only years Nostradamus mentions by name in his quatrains are 1999 and 3797. Of course, he could be talking about 2012 in some of his other quatrains. Or he could not. That's the magic of Nostradamus -- he was [[SharpshooterFallacy so vague that you can interpret him however you like, like]], which is where his "correct" predictions come from.


* One of the more hilarious examples: ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} V: Gods and Kings'' has the Mayans as a civilization. Not only do you get an achievement for using a nuclear weapon as them in the year 2012, but when you encounter them in game, their leader Pacal [[TheEeyore always talks about how the world will end any day now]].

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* One of the more hilarious examples: ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} V: Gods and Kings'' has the Mayans as a civilization. Not only do you get an achievement for using a nuclear weapon as on them in the year 2012, but when you encounter them in game, their leader Pacal [[TheEeyore always talks about how the world will end any day now]].


0Once upon a time, people thought December 21, 2012 was TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. Silly, right? Well, a surprising number of people took this seriously. Where did this date come from, you ask? Well, let's sort out fact and fiction:

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0Once Once upon a time, people thought December 21, 2012 was TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. Silly, right? Well, a surprising number of people took this seriously. Where did this date come from, you ask? Well, let's sort out fact and fiction:


Once upon a time, people thought December 21, 2012 was TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. Silly, right? Well, a surprising number of people took this seriously. Where did this date come from, you ask? Well, let's sort out fact and fiction:

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Once 0Once upon a time, people thought December 21, 2012 was TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. Silly, right? Well, a surprising number of people took this seriously. Where did this date come from, you ask? Well, let's sort out fact and fiction:


* Manga/StoneOcean, the 6th Arc of ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' was originally published between the years of 2000-2004 and takes place during 2012. [[spoiler: [ReligiousBruiser Enrico Pucci] uses Made In Heaven to accelerate time and reset the Universe so the Joestars do not exist]]. Ultimately, [[spoiler: he succeeds]].

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* Manga/StoneOcean, the 6th Arc of ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' was originally published between the years of 2000-2004 2000-2003 and takes place during 2012. [[spoiler: [ReligiousBruiser [[ReligiousBruiser Enrico Pucci] uses Pucci]] tries to synthesis the ultimate [[FightingSpirit Stand ability]], Made In Heaven Heaven, to accelerate time and reset the Universe so the Joestars [[HeroicLineage Joestars]] do not exist]]. Ultimately, [[spoiler: he succeeds]].exist]].

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[[folder:Asian Animation]]
* The trope is referenced in Season 8 episode 28 of ''Animation/HappyHeroes'', where Careless S. warns everyone that a meteor is headed towards the castle. Since everybody else is affected by an amnesia spell cast by Huo Haha, they completely forget about this and think he's joking, with one castle visitor in particular writing his statement into his book of top jokes directly above one reading "2012 is the end of the world". (This episode premiered in 2014, by the way.)
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* Music/MyChemicalRomance's 2010 concept album ''Music/DangerDaysTheTrueLivesOfTheFabulousKilljoys'' takes place TenMinutesIntoTheFuture (in 2019, that is) in an AfterTheEnd scenario. Promotional material is vague on what caused the collapse but implies that 2012 had something to do with it.

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* Music/MyChemicalRomance's 2010 concept album ''Music/DangerDaysTheTrueLivesOfTheFabulousKilljoys'' takes place TenMinutesIntoTheFuture TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture (in 2019, that is) in an AfterTheEnd scenario. Promotional material is vague on what caused the collapse but implies that 2012 had something to do with it.

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[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* Manga/StoneOcean, the 6th Arc of ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure'' was originally published between the years of 2000-2004 and takes place during 2012. [[spoiler: [ReligiousBruiser Enrico Pucci] uses Made In Heaven to accelerate time and reset the Universe so the Joestars do not exist]]. Ultimately, [[spoiler: he succeeds]].
[[/folder]]

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